5th New Hampshire Infantry

   

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in New Hampshire Infantry

Editor’s Note: Do you have information on this regiment’s role at the Siege of Petersburg?  Please contact us using the Contact button in the menu at the top of the screen.  We are happy to exchange information with other researchers.

Muster In: October 22, 18611
Muster Out: July 28, 1865 (or July 8?)2

Commander(s):
Colonel Charles E. Hapgood
Commander Image

Lieutenant Colonel James E. Larkin
Commander Image

Lt. Colonel Welcome A. Crafts
Commander Image

Captain J.S. Ricker
Commander Image

First Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army3

  • Commander:
    • Colonel Charles E. Hapgood (wounded on June 16, 1864)4,5
    • Major James E. Larkin (at least June 16-17, 1864 after Hapgood was wounded)6,7
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons: Springfield Rifles (.58 caliber) (June 30, 1864)8

Second Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army9

  • Commander: Major James E. Larkin (succeeded Hapgood after his wounding)10
  • Unit Strength: ~150 officers and men PFD (June 20, 1864)11
  • Weapons: Springfield Rifles (.58 caliber) (June 30, 1864)12

Third Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army13,14

  • Commander: Major James E. Larkin (at least July 27 and 31, 1864)15,16
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army17,18

  • Commander:
    • Major James E. Larkin (at least August 9, 1864)[41. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 338-340: Larkin was a Major in command of the 5th New Hampshire on August 9, 1864, the day he wrote this report.]
    • Captain J.S. Ricker (at least on August 14, 1864)19
    • Lieutenant Colonel (still Major?) James E. Larkin (at least on August 18 & 25 & 31, 1864)20,21,22
  • Unit Strength: ~112 “rifles” (August 12, 1864).23
  • Weapons:

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army24

  • Commander: Lt. Colonel James E. Larkin25
  • Unit Strength: ~325 officers and men PFD (September 30, 1864)26
  • Weapons:

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Note: After the three years men who had not reenlisted were discharged on October 12, 1864, the 5th NH became a battalion rather than a regiment.27
  • Commander: Lt. Colonel Welcome A. Crafts28
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Lt. Colonel Welcome A. Crafts29
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Lt. Colonel Welcome A. Crafts30
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Lt. Colonel Welcome A. Crafts31
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Dyer’s Compendium Info:
Petersburg Campaign Battles32:

  • Before Petersburg, Va., June 16-19.
  • Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865.
  • Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1865.
  • Deep Bottom, north of James River, July 27-28.
  • Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve).
  • Demonstration north of James River August 13-20.
  • Strawberry Plains August 14-18.
  • Ream’s Station August 25.
  • Non-Veterans mustered out October 12, 1864.
  • Reconnaissance to Hatcher’s Run December 9-10.
  • Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865.
  • Watkins’ House March 25.
  • Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9.
  • On line of Hatcher’s and Gravelly Runs March 29-30.
  • Hatcher’s Run or Boydton Road March 31.
  • White Oak Road March 31.
  • Sutherland Station April 2.
  • Fall of Petersburg April 2.

Bibliography:

Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

Sources:

  1. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
  2. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
  3. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 219
  4. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 256
  5. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 338: “…arriving in front of Petersburg on the morning of the 16th of June. About 3 p. m. the Fifth New Hampshire formed line of battle on the extreme right of the First Division and on the left of the Third Division. In the engagement which followed Colonel Charles E. Hapgood was wounded and the command of the regiment devolved on Major J. E. Larkin.”
  6. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 261
  7. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 338: “…arriving in front of Petersburg on the morning of the 16th of June. About 3 p. m. the Fifth New Hampshire formed line of battle on the extreme right of the First Division and on the left of the Third Division. In the engagement which followed Colonel Charles E. Hapgood was wounded and the command of the regiment devolved on Major J. E. Larkin.” AND “During a charge made by a portion of the Ninth Corps on the 17th I (Larkin) was ordered by the brigade commander to move my regiment forward.”
  8. Volume 13 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 5th New Hampshire Entry, Page 104; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
  9. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 219-220
  10. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 261
  11. George S. Gove Letter: June 20, 1864, Parsons Family Papers, Milne Special collections and Archives, University of New Hampshire, N.H.: “Our regt has not over 150 men for duty now, left Pt Lookout with 500, have had very hard work since we joined the army.”
  12. Volume 13 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 5th New Hampshire Entry, Page 104; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
  13. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 251
  14. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 729
  15. War Correspondence.” Irish American Weekly. August 13, 1864, p. ? col. ?: Larkin was the highest ranking officer remaining, so I’ve assumed he was in command at the time this letter was written: “Both in officers and men we have lost heavily, and as I know that it would be gratifying to many of our sick and wounded who are scattered around in hospitals through the different States to know the names of the officers who still survive, I here give them for their satisfaction:—Major James E. Larkin, Capt. John S. Ricker, Capt. Augustus D. Sanborn, 1st Lieut. Charles Hale, Acting Adjutant; 2d Lieut. George S. Gove, 2d Lieut. Wendell R. Cook, 2d Lieut. A. H. Perkins, 2d Lieut. George P. Hersum, 2d Lieut. Daniel Libby, Acting 2d Lieut. Robt H. Chace, Quartermaster J. W. Webber.”
  16. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 729
  17. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 612: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
  18. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 116, 129: “Return of Casualties in the Union Forces (August 1864)”
  19. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 266
  20. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 266
  21. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, pages 278-279, 288: Larkin was present at Ream’s Station and is referred to as a Lt. Colonel at this time by this source.
  22. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 612: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”: The Official Records still refer to Larkin as a Major on August 31, 1864.  More research is needed.
  23. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 286: This strength is taken from Adjutant Elias H. Marston’s account of Deep Bottom and Ream’s Station.  Is he referring only to enlisted men and not officers when he says 112 “rifles”?  Based on other evidence, it appears this might be the case.
  24. Sommers, Richard J. “Grant’s Fifth Offensive at Petersburg: A Study in Strategy, Tactics, and Generalship.  The Battle of Poplar Spring Church, the First Battle of the Darbytown Road, the Second Battle of the Squirrel Level Road, the Second Battle of the Darbytown Road (Ulysses S. Grant, Virginia).” Doctoral Thesis. Rice University, 1970. Print. p. 1298.
  25. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers never directly comes out and states this, but Larkin’s roster entry on Page 109 of the roster shows he was discharged on October 12, 1864, and no mention is made of him relinquishing command of the regiment until this point. It is assumed, therefore, that Larkin was in command of the 5th New Hampshire during the Fifth Offensive in late September-early October 1864.
  26. George S. Gove Letter: September 30, 1864, Parsons Family Papers, Milne Special collections and Archives, University of New Hampshire, N.H.: “I am afraid our regt. will make a very poor fighter. We have over 300 new recruits and only about 25 old men. They have not been drilled at all yet, but I hope we shall not disgrace our good name if we are called upon.”
  27. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 289
  28. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 289: Crafts was promoted from Captain to Lt. Col. and placed in charge of the 5th NH (now a battalion after reorganization) on October 12, 1864.
  29. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, page 293
  30. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, Part 2 (Roster), page 44
  31. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, Part 2 (Roster), page 44
  32. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)

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