ITINERARY: 48th North Carolina

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Siege of Petersburg Itinerary: 48th North Carolina

The State Flag of the 48th North Carolina (North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, North Carolina)

Unit Affiliations:

(Cooke), Heth, Third, Army of Northern Virginia

 

Note: On June 12, 1864, the regiment was in the trenches on the Cold Harbor battlefield.

 

June 1864

 

June 12, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Sunday. Cool night, quiet morning, considering some picket firing. Brigade partly relieved last night.”1

 

June 13, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Monday. The Yankees having left in our front last night, we are ordered to our right and march down the river, crossing at McClellan’s Bridge and down on south side near Bottom’s Bridge, arrive about 1:00 p.m., very dusty, at White Oak Swamp. Cavalry there. Saw Capt. Henry N. Hill, Capt. M. Ray, Jimmy Johnston. We throw up breastworks with abatis on point. MacRae gets prickish because I do not chime in with him and help him to work.”2

 

June 14, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Thursday. The Yankees having disappeared in front we again cross the swamp and move after them to the right. I received letters last night from wife telling me smallpox in Monroe. We move only about one mile and remain all day and at night camp on the ground. In the morning we began making breastworks, but before we had finished, we are ordered forward after some delay.”3

 

June 15, 1864:

  • 48th North Carolina and Cooke’s Brigade fight a skirmish near the Gary House, and officially called the “Skirmish near Smith’s Store” in the Official Records.
  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Wednesday. Our regiment are marched two miles down the Charles City Road toward Mrs. Gary’s. We then are marched perpendicular to our left flank by right flank. We build breastworks in edge of old field. The Yankee skirmishers firing upon ours endanger us within the works, many balls falling near us. No one was hit. The 24th Virginia Cavalry behaved shamefully, braggadocio and poltroonery appear as equally predominant in them. They would bristle up swelling, much bold and forward to part of our works, and then suddenly countermarch back as if they had forgotten something, or suddenly hear something drop. They did this often and made themselves not only ridiculous but contemptible. Our skirmishers were in front. We are ordered to advance through very thick undergrowth of woods, worse than the Wilderness. Our right rests on the road. The enemy’s skirmishers fire persistently upon us at close range. The skirmishers of the 27th North Carolina behave badly and break through our ranks, causing some of our Co. I to break also. They are with difficulty urged forward by Lt. Jones a swamp, but lag so slowly that our line of battle perceiving them in front sustain a heavy fire and are afraid to return it least they hit some of our own skirmishers. The enemy are obliquely on our left flank. I break off Co. B to deploy on our left flank and Co. G, H and E to march by their right flank perpendicularly to our rear, to prevent a flank movement from the enemy on our left. Co. B gets lost? We are shelled, lose 7 men killed and 32 wounded. Some of our best men fall. The regiment came near breaking. _____ behaved badly. Capt. Potts anxious to get to rear on account of lead, only wound appears his hand was hit. My shoulder received a glazing shot which cut a hole. We built and threw up some slight works. Gary’s Cavalry and Hampton’s Legion and 7th South Carolina come up and we retire to camp. Six in 27th [North Carolina] and two in 46th [North Carolina] killed, seventy wounded in all. Two in 5th [North Carolina] wounded, some killed. No enemy near. They move by left flank in rear of right of 27th [North Carolina] and there forward into line. This was called a skirmish, but for our regiment it was worse than a battle. It was dismounted cavalry (Wilson’s Division) we fought. They had Burnside breech loading carbines and some Spencer and some revolving rifles and pistols and were lying in ambush. I think we lost more than we gained. We took some few prisoners and some rifles and got several carbines. We came back from Mrs. Gary’s to camp about a mile west of our camp of the previous night.”4

 

June 16, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Thursday. We remain in camp throwing up a line of works in a field. Col. Galloway, 22nd [North Carolina] Regiment Scales Brigade, visits us. I feel uncomfortably annoyed by venison we eat all day.”5

 

June 17, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Friday. Still in camp. I take a bath and feel better. Day worsens, disagreeable and dusty. I take a second bath in White Oak Swamp and feel refreshed. We are ordered to move about 5:00 p.m. and go about four miles.”6

 

June 18, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Saturday. We continue the march, cross James River at Drewry’s Bluff on pontoon bridge before we rest. The strong entrenchments there are cheering news from Petersburg about victories and slaughter of the enemy which are greatly magnified. We continue to Port Walthall Junction where the Yankees take up the railroad track. Our armies are very much fatigued. We march 18 miles, and there was more straggling by other regiments (Walker’s and Kirkland’s), not so much by ours. Picket firing is heard by division on left. Left Port Walthall Junction and came to Petersburg (left one mile), as we lie until the other regiment late at night and take position and bivouac for the night. My horse did not arrive and I lay uncomfortably without covers. Hear of death of _____ of wounds. Picket firing through night. 1100 Negro said to be slain yesterday and 200 prisoners taken.”7

 

June 19, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Sunday. The day opens quietly. We begin to assemble to hear preaching by Rev. Granberry but we are ordered to the left down river Appomattox to Fort Clifton where we spend the day two and one-half miles northeast of Petersburg. Some shelling and fighting to left across river. 1400 Negroes said to be captured yesterday and two got away!!! High banks on bluffs to river in front, short three-quarters mile to front.”8

 

June 20,1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Monday. Change clothing and have my one washed and put on cotton clothes and a pair of cotton socks, but apart for first time since wooolen clothes. We are ordered to our left seven miles towards Richmond above Port Walthall Junction and arrive 11:00 p.m. or 1:00 a.m. of 21st.”9

 

June 21, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Tuesday. We are behind Pickett’s much whuffed division. Old Lee makes himself an undignified paternal fussy-puff for his petted and spoiled darlings. We camp at lower pontoon bridge over James River at Chaffin’s Bluff.”10

 

June 22, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Wednesday. We move towards Malvern Hill and stop at our old position near New Market, move towards river, entrench, in sight of pickets, come near being bit by copperhead snake. We retreat one-half mile and entrench in woods six feet apart as skirmishers. Receive a post shelling from gunboats. Eat some Irish potatoes and my bowels much affected and seeping blood.”11

 

June 23, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Thursday. Remain in line, post pickets.”12

June 24, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Friday. Sew my pants and while engaged thus, pants off, lady comes to complain about depredations in her potatoes. Consulted with much nonchalance sometime before leaving, part of the time quite pathetically, sympathizing sincerely and promise we will set a guard over the patch but cannot find the thief who took them.”13

 

June 25, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Saturday. This is the anniversary of our first battle two years ago at French’s Farm near Richmond, Virginia. This is a hot, sultry day. Men begin to sicken. Everything quiet. Beans today for dinner, garden snaps. Buttermilk for supper and some gooseberries for morning. Cavalry return from pursuing Sheridan. Regiment goes out to flank some Yankees. 1st North Carolina [Cavalry] and 6th South Carolina Cavalry camp near us.”14

 

June 26, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Sunday. Hot and sultry morning. Everything quiet. Cavalry pass us to cross at Drewry’s or Chaffin’s Bluff. I see Winchester and Chamby’s Brigade pass. We catch a squirrel and cook with snap beans and bacon for dinner, rich treat. I keep Sabbath much better than usual having my Bible with me. Read 53rd and 54th Isaiah and 1st and 17th Judges and five chapters in 2nd Corinthians, some Psalms and Galatians and vigil. Orders to make abatis. We hear report of the capture of 2000 prisoners and of 1600 and 500; the last only is true.”15

 

June 27, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Tuesday. Arise before day and graze my horse and heat the refreshing bustle of morning song: the cock’s shrill alarms, the warbling songsters. Enjoy the breezy calls. The magisterial Glory of lovely morning is lost to the sluggards. We finish our abatis and thereafter our sharpshooters make a term of observations and everything remains quiet.”16

 

 

 

July 1864

 

 

 

 

August 1864

 

August 18, 1864:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “I remained with it until 18 August when I received a sick leave of 30 days and went home.”17

 

 

September 1864

 

 

 

 

October 1864

 

 

November 1864

 

 

 

December 1864

 

 

 

January 1865

 

January 1, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “This day cold and clear, very cold and freezing. Gen. Cooke leaves for two days. I am in charge of brigade and Capt. John E. Moore of Co. I of the regiment.”18

 

 

January 2, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Monday. I visit picket line, excessively cold but clear and calm. Have a good dinner, opossum and potatoes, pie etc. Dr. Smithers said a colonel of 18th Mississippi would visit me today and borrow a plate and fork for him but he failed to come.”19

 

 

January 3, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Tuesday…visit pickets daily and have charge of brigade today and last night heaviest and most instant rain of the season and thunder. We were ordered to be ready to move on 7th as the enemy were reported moving on the Vaughn Road to our right.”20

 

 

January 15, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Brigade drill. Col. Hill visits Miss Southerland. Applications for leave of absence for 25 days. Received it for 18 days.”21

 

 

January 22, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Birthday, 47 years old. Took a glass with Col. Hill and Adjt. and S. Timmons.”22

 

 

January 23-24, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Heavy cannonading in James River at night by our ironclads [Battle of Trent’s Reach]. Rumors of good news about peace propositions from Lincoln through F. P. Blair, and of English and French recognition. Gold comes down from 80 to 35 for 1.”23

 

 

January 25, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Capt. T. K. Potts drunk on dress parade and falls down.”24

 

 

January 26, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Visit Capt. McLane, Paymaster, to receive pay for November and December 1864 and January, $390.00.”25

 

 

January 27, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Expect to leave for home for 18 days with Gen. MacRae. I will not leave until 29th Sunday morning for fear of missing connection to stage. I visited paymaster McLane yesterday and received pay for only the month of November and December to 1st day of January 1865, $390.00.”26

 

 

January 29, 1865:

  • Colonel Samuel Walkup [possibly] left the front, bound for home for 18 days. His journal is blank between January 27 and February 16, 1865.

 

 

 

 

February 1865

 

February 5, 1865:

  • Participated in the Battle of Hatcher’s Run, with many casualties: “The regiment had been engaged on the 5th of February in front of works in a fight with the Yankees, one officer, Lt. H.W. Laney, and five men killed on the field, three mortally wounded, 14 severely and 20 slightly wounded and seven missing…”27

 

 

February 16,1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Returned to Brigade Hospital and on 16th returned to camp. The regiment had been engaged on the 5th of February in front of works in a fight with the Yankees, one officer, Lt. H.W. Laney, and five men killed on the field, three mortally wounded, 14 severely and 20 slightly wounded and seven missing. Our regiment suffers some more than the whole brigade. The 55th Regiment North Carolina and Mississippi Brigade were added to Cooke’s Brigade only a day or two before the battle.”28

 

 

February 18, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Sent by Sgt. Eubanks to Dr. J.M. Miller for E.H. Britton advertisement bulletin $27.00 in full of his account for publishing deserters August 17, 1863, and $13.00 to W.J. Yates for Minnie’s paper. Received of Capt. Potts for deserters published $5.00 from Capt. Turner for two ditto $5.00, B. F. Richardson for $20.00. From Capt. Moore ditto $15.00.”29

 

 

February 20, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Four men deserted last night, Hugh Starnes and Therrell from Co. A. and W. Vickory and Evan Watson from Co. F. Five men of Co. C, Sgt. Scroggs and L. Litton were accidentally severely wounded by Sapp of Co. K whose gun was loaded on drill. Sent my trunk and quire of paper to wife by Jack Griffin.”30

 

 

February 21, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “…Deserters increase and commit many desperations about home, our prospects getting more gloomy fast. We had three more desertions last night: McRae and Moore of Co. K and Griffin of [Co.] E. Rev. Wiche has horse to go to Petersburg today.”31

 

 

February 22, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “The birthday of General Washington, President United States, a fine and promising day. At 5:00 a.m. we had orders to be ready to move on shortest notice and that the enemy were moving on our right. There was great rejoicing in Yankee’s camp over fall of Columbia and Charleston. Three men deserted last night from Co. G.: Abram Cross, D.W. Snider, John Lomax.”32

 

 

February 23,1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “On last night 17 men deserted, many of them to the Yankees, some of them home. Other regiments in this brigade have exceeded us. On yesterday I received a short address of my own in the shape of a pencil order to the regiment on the subject of desertion, which pleased the officers and men very much as appropriate and in season. Many of them wish to have it published. Sent up resignation of Capt. J.W. Bitting, Co. K and Lt. Shaw, Co. D…33

 

 

February 28, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “We had whiskey rations today and by request gave at dark rousing cheers to shoo off the Yankees. The boys were merry and called upon myself and other officers for speeches. I gave them a short talk flattering the regiment. They carried me in corn shucking style to my tent on their shoulders, were in fine glee. They visit Gen. Cooke with the band and several from the other regiments and had a speech from him and others and again called on me. I responded and all retired well pleased. We hear Grant is massing his forces on our right.”34

 

 

 

March 1865

 

March 3, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Two deserters from picket line last night.”35

 

 

March 4, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: Last night we had orders to move as the enemy were expected to move on us in the right of us. Did not move, heavy rain on night of 5th Co. H has nine deserters. They stuck a paper giving reasons for offense if any and asking pardon, to take 60 days furlough and do no crime…”36

 

 

March 6, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Review today by Gen. Heth, day fair Cooke’s a little raw and does not give all the usual commands…”37

 

 

March 7, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Five men from Co. H deserted last night, two with arms from picket line to enemy, three from camp. Received Hon. John A. Gilmer’s letter and Attorney General Davis opinion and note from Secretary of War on examination etc.”38

 

March 8, 1865:

  • Walkup wrote a letter to his sister Sarah N. Walkup Belk, with the heading ‘breastworks at Hatcher’s Run,’ and the editor of his papers believes this letter was written between March 8 and 30, 1865.39

 

 

 

March 9, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “One deserter, Andrew Brown of Co. G, off picket line last night. Received today news of capture of 1500 men and three pieces of artillery by our forces near Kinston, North Carolina on yesterday, a good set off for Sheridan’s capture of Early’s forces near Staunton, Virginia and a fair test of North Carolina and Virginia fighting.”40

 

 

March 10, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “This is fast day and we endeavor to keep it as such. I sent off box to Greensboro, North Carolina. I send up recommendations for Richardson and Turner for promotion whichever is senior in rank. Three deserters from picket last night.”41

 

 

March 12, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “We were called out before day to the trenches this morning upon report of a Yankee deserter, that the enemy intended to attack our works by daylight, remained a couple of hours and permitted to return to camp. Then received orders to be ready to move at shortest notice. Enemy unusually quiet in front this morning, perhaps gone to Stony Creek where we may be ordered. Capt. J.K. Potts of Co. C, who was cashiered for drunkenness, his besetting sin, left us today. I let him have my horse to ride and carry his baggage. This Company’s officers are unfortunate. One is a drunkard, one a rogue, one a coward, two killed, two resigned from disability and incapacity, none left.”42

 

 

March 17,1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Four desertions left from pickets line last night. William McWhorter returned bringing terrible news. Plundering by Yankees in Waxhaw and Cane Creek, Lancaster, South Carolina, insult and murder of Abel Belk.”43

 

 

March 18, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Lt. William Austin, Co. I, Sgt. Eubanks, Co. E and all furlough men returned 18th.”44

 

 

March 20, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “We have orders to have two day’s rations cooked up and to be ready to move at daylight this morning. I think we will leave this time out right and many of us will never see this camp again…”45

 

 

 

March 23, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Here yet in charge of brigade for last three days. Gen. Cooke gone to Richmond to return tonight. Glad of it, as we received orders today that Yankees were moving to right and to be prepared to move…”46

 

 

March 24, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Friday. Unlucky day, we begin our March tonight to north of Richmond on James River. We to perhaps reinforce Longstreet, who it is said expects attack two brigades. We, Cooke’s, [and] McComb’s Brigade, left after 10:00 p.m. I never like to begin anything or enterprise on Friday. It is a common and vulgar prejudice and this day’s operation has verified the superstition of its ill omen.”47

 

March 25, 1865:

  • The 48th NC and Cooke’s Brigade march towards the Battle of Fort Stedman, but are called back to their original lines near Hatcher’s Run when the Union forces launch attacks against the entire Confederate picket line southwest of Petersburg.48,49
  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “We were all night until 4:00 a.m. dragging in weary impatience to between Petersburg and the trenches where we bivouacked on the old ground behind a bluff. The city had a gloomy, desolate, haunted appearance like some plague had depopulated it and spread its deadly still over its remains. We began to conjecture that we were sent to the trenches for our frequent desertions, where the continuous firing of both parties would prevent us going over to the enemy. But we were told that we might expect a fight in the morning. When we were awakened just after daylight 25th we were told that our forces at Gen. Gordon’s suggestion had captured three-fourths of a mile of the enemy’s and one fort or more with a loss of only 50 in all, taking many prisoners and killing and wounding very many, making a grand surprise of the enemy and doing a most marvelous thing which was just the beginning of much greater. That we had cut the enemy line in two and would roll back their left and capture it from the Appomattox to Hatchers Run. We were sent into the trenches between the Crater and beyond creeks on right of it. We were shelled and mortared some little before we took our position, heavy firing was heard on the left and in sight. We saw our forces in the Yankee fort recoiling and the Yankees retaking possession. They had in fact renewed all their ground, killed, wounded and captured more than they had lost in the early part of the fight. As one of the officers told me we had split a horn instead of making a spoon. I regret that my friend and companion Lt. Col. James Taylor Davis was here mortally wounded. I saw him at Fairground, he died soon after. He was suffering severely and did not expect. spoke of Yankees being in Monroe… I could do nothing for him and left there was fighting at our right from whence firing, promising to call again if possible. We had to leave the road and zigzagging our way along keep out of view of the Yankee’s lookout which overlooks the whole country and must be 150 or 200 feet high. Such was Gen. Lee’s order. Shells were falling beyond us, and we were double quicking to get out of the way. When we got within less than a mile of an old quarters the firing hurried us up and we got informed that the enemy had captured one picket line and most of our pickets. Our regiment lost five by desertion and Lt. Reed. We manned our works immediately and began firing upon the enemy in our old picket one. We then sent sharpshooters on their left flanks and drove the Yankees out of our pickets, without much loss-two killed, four wounded, and we (48th) captured some 17 men and many more killed and wounded. We sent pickets to remain [on] the line under Capt. Richardson and Lt. James Austin”‘ of Co. E . This last gallant, brave and most efficient officer was killed heroically leading his men forward and is a very serious loss to the regiment, being one of the very best in it. About 10:00 a.m. the Yankees made a determined effort to recapture the picket line but were repulsed with a loss by our pickets…”50

 

 

March 26, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “…Since that time all remained quiet and last night [March 25 or 26?] we occupied our old quarters leaving two companies to guard the line.”51

 

 

March 27, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “This morning Scales and McGowan recaptured the lines lost by Thomas last Saturday near Battery Gregg. Gen. Lee passed here today. Report of New York Herald of execution of two deserters from Yankees.”51

 

 

March 29, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “The Yankees under Sheridan are moving to our right and some fighting is going on the south side of Watlings Creek. I have just heard that Lt. Col. James T. Davis [of the 49th NC] is dead [mortally wounded at Fort Stedman].”53

 

 

March 30, 1865:

  • Samuel H. Walkup writes a letter to his wife Minnie “from the breastworks at Hatcher’s Run”: “We have returned, as I wrote to you in pencil on the 27th, from our trip to Petersburg and have been resting in our old quarters comfortably until yesterday, when Sheridan passed around our right and is probably tearing up our railroad towards Danville, as our cavalry under Fitzhugh Lee is very inefficient. There was some sharp fighting and skirmishing on our right yesterday and our pickets were all driven in on the south side of Hatchers Run. They had all been driven in on this side last Saturday, but Cooke’s Brigade on its return recaptured our lines. MacRae, Davis and others [picket lines] are still held by the Yankees… There was fighting last night towards Petersburg on our left, and there is fighting just now across the creek and rather in our rear this morning. We were sent out to the breastworks last night and stayed there in some houses all night. It began to rain in the night and has not yet ceased. I think Grant has sent Sheridan around our right flank to cut the Southside Railroad and draw our attention there, whilst he is sending reinforcements to Sherman by his left flank down toward Weldon, North Carolina. We are expecting an advance here upon our works and fear the Yankees will also come in on our right and rear. Our force is very weak. Grant must have from three to five to our one, whereas Johnston in North Carolina has as many men as Sherman, if not more. It is true we have entrenchments before us, but we generally have to fight outside of them as we are too few to man them against a strong assault.”54

 

 

 

April 1865

 

April 1, 1865:

  • 48th North Carolina suffers quite a few captured on their skirmish line today. Which small skirmish is this? More research is needed.55
  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “P.S. April 1st. We have been fighting and skirmishing ever since I began this letter. The enemy have massed in force on our right; we have had another picket line captured losing 44 men in the 48th [North Carolina] Regiment. We have only 98 privates and non-commissioned officers in this regiment for duty and 15 company officers, leaving out those companies sent to hunt deserters (A and B). I send you a list of those captured from Union County, many of whom did not try to escape. Five of the deserters have returned, viz. Hugh Stevens, Frank Cuthbertson, Willie Medlin, Joe Williams, Theo Simpson, Thad Crowell and nine others from Davidson County…”56

 

 

April 12, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “We left camp [at Appomattox CH after surrender and parole] at 4:00 p.m. and came five or six miles, camped at night. Got cup of coffee and some cakes. Walk left to bridge to Campbell Court House where W. Alexander gave me a julep and dinner. We got a drink and meal and camp five miles beyond. Left day.”57

 

 

April 14, 1865:

  • From the Journal of Colonel Samuel H. Walkup, commanding 48th NC: “Beautiful country, saw Peaks of Otter. Failed to cross at bridge because burnt. [Observe Union cavalry].”58

 

 

Sources:

  1. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 144
  2. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 144
  3. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 144
  4. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, pp. 144-145
  5. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, pp. 145-146
  6. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 146
  7. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 146
  8. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 146
  9. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 146
  10. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 147
  11. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 147
  12. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 147
  13. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 147
  14. Walkup, S. H. Writings of a Rebel Colonel: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Samuel Walkup, 48th North Carolina Infantry. Edited by Kemp Pendleton Burpeau, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2021, p. 147
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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Lisa Fulton March 2, 2022 at 12:40 pm

Another excellent itinerary. Congratulations on all the good work you are doing – pulling material together, concentrating it, and putting it all on this super-linked web site.

Brett Schulte March 2, 2022 at 4:04 pm

Thanks Lisa! I’m working on an itinerary of the 2nd Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery as we speak. This one is based on a daily diary and the guy was present throughout the entire Siege. I really need to do the Confederate side at the regimental level and work up to brigades and divisions. The Union side has really good itineraries in the Official Records for the higher level units. Michael Hardy and others have good books on entire Confederate brigades, and I’ll use those whenever available as a baseline.

Brett

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