ITINERARY: 85th Pennsylvania

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Siege of Petersburg Itinerary: 85th Pennsylvania

Unit Affiliations:

(1), 1, X, Army of the James

(1), 1, XXIV, Army of the James (while attached to 199th PA)

Provost Guard, 1, XXIV, Army of the James

 

Note: At the start of June 1864, the regiment was in the Bermuda Hundred trenches near Ware Bottom Church.

June 1864

June 1, 1864

  • “The Regiment on picket since 5 o clock last evening; at 3 a. m. the enemy opened with a heavy fire of artillery; a shell passed through Lieut. Col. Campbell’s tent; two flags of truce came from the enemy, the bearers of one came to notify the pickets to keep inside the rifle pits; relieved at 5 p. m. by the 39th Illinois; enemy opened heavy artillery fire for half an hour about 11 p. m.; weather pleasant.”1

 

June 2, 1864

  • “The enemy attacked pickets at 6 a. m., and drove them from first line of rifle pits; Regiment at trenches all day; also during the night; began raining before dark and continued until after midnight.”2

 

June 3, 1864

  • “Cold, damp morning; a detachment of the Regiment ordered to the advanced posts; Regiment went on picket at 5 p. m.; Adolph Hathaway, Company F, killed on the picket line.”3

 

June 4, 1864

  • “Beautiful morning; enemy perfectly quiet in front; Regiment returned to camp in the evening through a heavy rain.”4

 

 

June 5, 1864

  • “Day broke cloudy, soon followed by rain; part of the Regiment ordered on picket in the evening; the enemy opened an artillery fire on our camps at 6.30 p. m., which was responded to by our batteries; ceased at 7 p. m.; the commissary issued a ration of soft bread; the Sanitary Commission, sauer-kraut and pickles.”5

 

 

June 6, 1864

  • “Delightful weather; fresh beef and clothing issued to the men; several flags of truce passed between the lines in reference to burying the dead lying between the lines; the companies relieved from picket last evening ordered on fatigue duty in the forenoon and again on picket at 6 p. m., relieving the Regiment’s pickets.”6

 

 

June 7, 1864

  • “Pleasant weather; light artillery fire from the enemy’s batteries; Regimental pickets relieved at 6 p. m.”7

 

 

June 8, 1864

  • “Fair weather; Regiment in camp, some of the men building bomb proofs in camp; Regiment stacked arms in the trenches during the night.”8

 

 

June 9, 1864

  • “Delightful weather; musketry fire in front; Regiment goes on picket at 6 p. m.”9

 

 

June 10, 1864

  • “Pleasant weather; Regiment on picket; relieved at 6 p. m.; no firing in front throughout the day; 327 rations of whiskey were issued to the men on their return from the picket-line; news of Lincoln’s re-nomination caused favorable comment in camp.”10

 

 

June 11, 1864

  • “Weather pleasant; Regiment in camp; some of the men engaged building bomb proofs; Private William H. Mahoney, Company C, fell from bomb proof breaking an arm; Quartermaster Beall applied for furlough but his application was returned disapproved; Col. Howell assumed command of the division owing to illness of Gen. Terry: Lieut. Norman B. Ream, who was severely wounded February 22, returned to Regiment.”11

 

*****

 

SOPO Editor’s Note: On the night of June 12, 1864, The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign began as Grant removed his forces from the Cold Harbor battlefield and prepared to cross the James River.

June 12, 1864

  • “A pleasant, quiet Sunday; no firing at the front; Regiment went on picket at 6 p. m.; 133d Ohio Regiment (100 days men) temporarily assigned to Howell’s brigade.”12

 

 

June 13, 1864

  • “Pleasant weather; Regiment on picket; all quiet along the picket-line; relieved at 6 p. m. and returned to camp; men treated to a ration of whiskey on their return to camp; Regiment ordered in the trenches at 11 p. m.”13

 

 

June 14, 1864

  • “Weather pleasant; rather cool for June; Gen. Grant visited Gen. Butler’s headquarters; Gen. Gillmore relieved of the command of the 10th Corps and Gen. Terry temporarily assigned to the command; Brig. Gen. R. S. Foster, commanding Third Brigade temporarily assigned to the command of the division; Sergt. Thomas M. Harford, Company I, played a joke on Private John W. Rowland, Company B, on duty at Regimental Hospital; the latter was constantly boasting of always being the first to secure the New York and Philadelphia papers on their arrival at camp; Harford picked up some old, discarded papers, secured an old mule on which he came galloping into camp where he knew Rowland to be; the latter secured one and without examining it himself, rushed with it to Dr. Sandt, who grasped it quite eagerly expecting to get the latest news, but at a glance his joy turned to chagrin; his disappointment being made evident by forceful language aimed at Rowland; it was difficult to decide which was the greatest victim of the joke, the Dr. or Rowland; prayer-meeting in camp in evening; Regiment lay in the trenches during night.”14

 

 

June 15, 1864

  • “Pleasant day; Grant’s army crossing the James River; Regiment went on picket at 6 p. m.; enemy kept up quite a stir in front of Regiment’s picket throughout most of the night; a portion of Lee’s army crossed the James River to the south bank near the Howlett House.”15

 

 

June 16, 1864

  • “At daybreak the enemy was discovered to have abandoned his works; the pickets were immediately advanced to occupy them; after pressing the rear guard of the enemy a superior force compelled the Union forces to fall back, the Regiment resuming former position on the picket line about 6 p. m.; Com. Sergt. Bell went to the front where the Regiment was in position with rations but was forced to retire without issuing, as just then the Regiment was engaged in an effort to hold the enemy’s outer works; Bell asked Lieut. Col. Campbell what he should do with the rations, the latter excitedly replied: ‘To hell with your rations! I have no time to consider such things,’ and then dashed down the Regimental line on a gallop, soon lost to sight in a thicket, with his orderly endeavoring to follow in his wake; before Sergt. Bell could repeat the orders of the lieutenant-colonel, Teamster Fred Lowry, who was driving the commissary-wagon team, spying the enemy advancing in overwhelming force, was driving pell-mell to the rear, and did not halt until he reached camp; Fred saved the rations from the enemy and also from his Regimental comrades that day, the latter having been forced to retire to the position formerly held by them, holding the enemy at bay during the night without supper or sleep; Col. Howell was wounded during the day and had his horse shot under him.”16

 

 

June 17, 1864

  • “Immediately after daybreak the enemy’s sharpshooters opened fire on our lines and kept up a sharp fire during the day; late in the afternoon the enemy advanced in superior force and drove the Regiment back about 200 yards, where it remained until 10.30 p. m., when it was relieved by the 67th Ohio; during the day four men of the Regiment were instantly killed; three taken prisoners of war, and several others wounded; those instantly killed were Privates Patterson Jobes, and Taylor Reynolds, Company A; Henry Fry, Company F, and Jesse Dial, Company H; prisoners of war: Privates Thomas Orbin, Moses Smith and Joshua Torrence, Company B; among the wounded were Lieut. Norman B. Ream, Company H, and Sergt. John G. Woodward, Company C, the latter mortally; Lieut. Ream returned to the Regiment on the evening of June 11, although not fully recovered from his wound of February 22, and was voluntarily at the front, in command of a portion of the Regiment; the enemy’s bullet struck him below his former wound on the lower right limb; the lieutenant remarked to those nearest him that the enemy was exceedingly kind not to have disabled his other limb.”17

 

 

June 18, 1864

  • “Although the Regiment was relieved of duty on the picket line before midnight it did not reach camp until 3 a. m.; the enemy remained quiet in front during the forenoon; Company A sent the remains of Patterson Jobes home for burial; about 4 p. m. the enemy attacked the position held by the 67th Ohio and drove it back; the Regiment was immediately ordered to re-inforce the latter, and the combined force, after a spirited contest, forced the enemy to retire; the Regiment remaining on picket during the night at the same position it had held on the 17th; in regaining the former position, Privates Ross Rush, Company H, and Jacob Deselms, Company E, were instantly killed, and the following were wounded: Capt. R. R. Sanner and Private William Hileman, Company H; Privates John Clendaniel, and Hiram Haver, Company D, and Private Isaac L. Hall, Company K; Gen. W. T. H. Brooks assumed command of the 10th Corps.”18

 

 

June 19, 1864

  • “As if by mutual consent the pickets on both sides refrained from firing at each other during the day; the Regiment was relieved by a detachment of the 67th Ohio and returned to camp at 7 p. m.”19

 

 

June 20, 1864

  • “The men were congratulating themselves that they would have a good night’s rest, as the enemy was quiet in front, when they received orders to get ready for an expedition, with 100 rounds of cartridges, two days rations, in light marching orders; Regiment left camp at 5 p. m., and marched to the bank of the James River where it bivouacked during the night near Jones Landing at a point called Jones Neck.”20

 

 

June 21, 1864

  • “Immediately after daybreak the Regiment crossed the James River to the north bank, on a pontoon-bridge thrown across the river during the night, and heavy details were immediately put to work fortifying the approaches to the bridge on the north side of the James; seven companies of the Regiment went on picket in the evening; Com. Sergt. Bell brought a ration of whiskey to the men, with other rations, but was not permitted to take it to the picket-line; no signs of the enemy being near during the first day and night.”21

 

 

June 22, 1864

  • “No signs of the enemy until noon when his skirmishers advanced, but soon retired when the pickets opened fire on them; Regiment relieved of picket duty by the 10th Connecticut about dark; Sergt. John G. Woodward who was mortally wounded on June 17, died at Regimental hospital; President Lincoln passed by the camp of the Regiment at Bermuda Hundred.”22

 

 

June 23, 1864

  • “Weather very warm; orders issued to pitch tents which were shortly revoked, followed by orders to get ready to return to Bermuda Hundred camp, which were also countermanded; three companies of the Regiment ordered on picket; the other companies lay in line of battle during the night in expectation of an attack by the enemy.”23

 

 

June 24, 1864

  • “During the afternoon that part of the Regiment not on picket was detailed for fatigue duty erecting a redan on the hill in front; while the men were in expectancy of receiving orders to return to the Bermuda Hundred camp they received word they were to remain on the north side of the James two days longer; fresh beef had been issued to the company cooks in the Bermuda Hundred camp, and it was cooked awaiting them, as the Regiment was expected to arrive in time for supper.”24

 

 

June 25, 1864

  • “Regiment re-crossed the James River during the forenoon [from north of the James River in the Deep Bottom Bridgehead], starting about 11 a. m., arriving at former camp [near Ware Bottom Church] about 3 p. m., and the men were permitted to rest in their tents during the night.”25

 

 

June 26, 1864

  • “James A. Proudfit, formerly a member of Company A, visited the Regimental camp as a member of a committee of the Christian Commission; the other members were Dr. Wales, Dr. Pollock and Mr. Mercer. Hosp. Steward Bebout returned from furlough; John Wibley, who was discharged on Surgeon’s certificate from Company A, May 1, 1862, returned to the company today; he was drafted March 1, 1864, for three years, and at his request was assigned to his former company; Regiment ordered on picket at 6 p, m.; the relieved pickets reported that they could distinctly hear the enemy engaged at religious service during the day.”26

 

 

June 27, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket-line until 6 p. m.; the ‘Johnnies’ showed no disposition to fire upon the ‘Yankees’; Regiment returned to camp in the evening; prior to its return Com. Sergt. Bell took out a ration of whiskey, which was distributed to the men.”27

 

 

June 28, 1864

  • “Regiment lay in camp all day and the following night ; prayer-meeting in camp in the evening; Regimental provision return indicates the strength of the Regiment as 398.”28

 

 

June 29, 1864

  • “Men lay in camp throughout the day; the Christian Commission issued some sanitary supplies to the Regiment; quiet at the immediate front, but heavy cannonading in the direction of Petersburg; Regiment went on picket on the left open field; enemy’s pickets were very friendly.”29

 

 

June 30, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket until 6 p. m.; relieved by the 39th Illinois; Sergt. David D. Watson, of Company B, who had been sent north to General Hospital by authority of Surgeon, returned to the Regiment today and learned that he had been reduced to the ranks during his absence; Sutler R. M. Modisette, visited the camp today, his first appearance since the Regiment left South Carolina; Regiment mustered for pay in the evening, after returning from the picket-line, by Lieut. Col. Campbell.”30

 

 

July 1864

July 1, 1864

  • “Regimental inspection at 9 a. m. by a staff officer of the Second Brigade. An order was read directing that 1st Lieut. John A. Gordon, who had been detached on recruiting service in 1862; then detached elsewhere and court-martialed and sentenced to be dismissed from the service, be returned to duty, by order of the President; Regiment lay in camp all day; prayer-meeting in the evening.”31

 

July 2, 1864

  • “Fresh bread and fresh meat issued to the men; Q. M. Beall was appointed brigade quartermaster on the staff of Col. Howell; Regiment went on picket at 6 p.m.”32

 

 

July 3, 1864

  • “Extremely hot day; Regiment on picket until 6 p. m., when it was relieved and returned to camp, the men receiving a drink of whiskey on their arrival.”33

 

 

July 4, 1864

  • “Regiment lay in camp during the day; the commissary drew a barrel of whiskey containing 43 gallons; this was medicated by five ounces of quinine; one of the men belonging to Company C, decrying the quality of the whiskey, saying it was not fit to drink, was ‘tied up’ as punishment for his impertinence; George Bolsinger of Company I was taken to the Washington Insane Asylum by Sergt. John G. Stevens, Company I; Corp. B. F. Campbell, Company G, and Private Samuel Johnson, Company I; Regiment went on picket at 6 p.m.”34

 

 

July 5, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket until 6 p. m., when it was relieved by the 62d Ohio; orders were issued for all men detailed on duty at Regimental headquarters, in the commissary’s and quartermaster’s departments to return to their companies for duty.”35

 

July 6, 1864

  • “Regiment had a good day’s rest in camp; commissary drew pickles, cabbage and beets; 11 heads of cabbage and 30 pounds of beets to the hundred rations; these vegetables are issued in lieu of rice, as comparatively few of the men care for the latter; prayer-meeting in camp in the evening.”36

 

July 7, 1864

  • “Commissary department received two days rations of cabbage and one day’s ration of beets; also another barrel of whiskey; Regiment went on picket at 6 p. m. in an open field in front; slight rain; heavy cannonading in the direction of Petersburg; very little firing between the pickets.”37

 

July 8, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket until evening, when it was relieved by the 62d Ohio; flag of truce went to the enemy during the day said to relate to sending letters to prisoners of war; on returning to camp the men received a drink of whiskey minus the quinine, the supply of the latter having been exhausted; general rejoicing among the men in con sequence.”38

 

July 9, 1864

  • “Regiment in camp during the day; went on picket in the evening; as a pastime in camp many of the men would take the brass plugs from unexploded shells fired by the enemy and make rings and other ornaments; while Private Walter O. Donnell, Company A, was removing the plug from a shell it exploded, killing him instantly, and wounding three others of the company, viz.: Privates William Milligan, William Morrison and John S. Butterfoss; Sergt. Stevens. Corp. Campbell and Private Johnson, who were detailed to take Private George Bolsinger to the Insane Asylum, returned to the Regiment.”39

 

July 10, 1864

  • “Regiment lay on picket; all quiet in front; relieved in the evening by the 39th Illinois; Lieut. Johnson of Company I, wounded on May 20, returned to the Regiment.”40

 

July 11, 1864

  • “Regiment lay in camp all day, and the men were permitted to rest during the night undisturbed; Private George W. Chick, who had been absent sick, returned to the Regiment; weather extremely warm; thunder-storm in the evening.”41

 

July 12, 1864

  • “Regiment in camp during the day; went on picket at 6 p.m.; cannonading in the direction of Petersburg.”42

 

July 13, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket until evening when it returned to camp; Gen. Brooks, commanding the 10th Corps, issued orders prohibiting commissioned officers from being on too familiar terms with the men; Lieut. Col. Campbell gave notice that this order would be strictly enforced.”43

 

July 14, 1864

  • “Regiment in camp during the day; went on picket at 6 p.m.”44

 

July 15, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket during the day; the pickets of the enemy continue friendly; Regiment returned to camp at 6 p. m.; standing order for the Regiment to be in line of battle at 3.30 a. m. every day.”45

 

July 16, 1864

  • “Regiment in camp during the day; general inspection by Capt. R[ichard]. W. Dawson, assistant inspector-general of the brigade; Regiment went on picket at 6. p. m. in open field.”46

 

July 17, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket until 6 p. m., when relieved by the 39th Ill. Regiment.”47

 

July 18, 1864

  • “Regiment ordered to the intrenchments shortly after midnight, some deserters from the enemy having reported a general attack to be made; Regiment remained in camp during the day; prayer-meeting in the evening; Gen. Brooks relinquished the command of the 10th Corps to Gen. Terry; Gen. R. S. Foster assuming command of the First Division.”48

 

July 19, 1864

  • “Heavy rain all day, the first heavy rain for several weeks ; Companies A, B, G and K detailed for picket duty at Point of Rocks; the other companies on picket near Ware Bottom Church; continues to rain throughout the night.”49

 

July 20, 1864

  • “Day opens cloudy and threatening rain; showers at intervals during the day; pickets at Ware Bottom Church relieved at 6 p. m.; Companies A, B, G and K remain on picket at Point of Rocks; Regimental commissary wagon took rations to them.”50

 

July 21, 1864

  • “Companies in camp called into line at 3 a. m.; details from companies in camp go on picket in the evening; four companies remain on picket at Point of Rocks; the ration of fresh bread has been reduced from 22 ounces to 18; Maj. Gen. D. B. Birney assigned to command of 10th Corps, subject to the approval of the President.”51

 

July 22, 1864

  • “Companies C, E, H and I sent to Point of Rocks to relieve the four companies on picket there; the details on picket at Ware Bottom Church relieved in the evening; Companies A, B, G and K return to camp from Point of Rocks.”52

 

July 23, 1864

  • “Private James Beatty, Company C, home on furlough, was married and over-stayed his time, and being charged with desertion, is now being court-martialed; Companies C, E, H and I remain on picket near Point of Rocks; Maj. Gen. D. B. Birney resumes command of 10th Corps, and Gen. Terry reassumed command of the 1st Division.”53

 

July 24, 1864

  • “Companies C, E, H and I still on picket near Point of Rocks; balance of Regiment go on picket near Ware Bottom Church; raining all night; cold and very disagreeable.”54

 

July 25, 1864

  • “Day opens exceedingly cold and raining, but by noon clears up, the balance of the day being very pleasant; the companies on picket at Ware Bottom Church relieved in the evening; Companies C, E, H and I on picket near Point of Rocks were relieved at 4 p. m. and returned to camp.”55

 

July 26, 1864

  • “Regiment called out at 3.30 a. m. and stood in line of battle until a half hour after sunrise; Sergt. Greer Hair, Company A, received a letter from Thomas J. Barr of same company, the latter being a prisoner of war in Richmond; Regiment went on picket in open field at 6 p. m.”56

 

July 27, 1864

  • “Regiment remains on picket until evening when it is relieved and returns to camp; Second Corps and a division of cavalry cross the James River to the north bank at Jones Landing, and recapture some guns near Fort Darling captured by the enemy in May.”57

 

July 28, 1864

  • “Owing to illness and wounds Col. Howell was granted leave of absence; Col. Francis B. Pond, 62d Ohio, assigned to the command of the brigade during his absence; part of the Regiment went on picket in the woods at 6 p.m.”58

 

July 29, 1864

  • “Regimental provision return indicates the total number of men present entitled to draw rations as 371; commissary department drew 116 lbs. of onions; 116 lbs. of turnips and 77 lbs. of beets; detachment of the Regiment on picket relieved by another detachment from the Regiment in the evening.”59

 

July 30, 1864

  • “Orders were issued for the Regiment to be in readiness to move at a moment’s notice with two days rations, and in light marching orders; three companies went on picket at 6 p. m., relieving the pickets of the Regiment on duty at the front.”60

 

July 31, 1864

  • “Regiment called out at 3.30 a. m. and remained in line of battle until a half hour after sunrise; Capt. R. R. Sanner, Company H, wounded June 18, returned to the Regiment; Companies A, F and D went on picket at 6 p. m., relieving Companies K, G and B.”61

 

 

 

August 1864

August 1, 1864

  • “A nice summer day but quite warm; a petition from the enlisted men of the Regiment was sent to Gov. Curtin invoking his influence to have the Regiment mustered out of the service at the expiration of three years from the date of first muster in October 16, 1861; Regiment went on picket in the evening, in the woods.”62

 

August 2, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket in the woods near Ware Bottom Church until 6 p. m.; all quiet in front; constitutional amendment granting soldiers in the field the right of suffrage voted on in Pennsylvania today.”63

 

 

August 3, 1864

  • “Regiment lay in camp all day; some rain in the afternoon, but otherwise the day was pleasant; provision return of the Regiment indicates 386 men present; drew 386 lbs. of potatoes and 109 lbs. of turnips; Regimental quartermaster ordered to surrender his team to brigade quartermaster; team to be furnished the Regiment when needed on application to the latter.”64

 

August 4, 1864

  • “Regiment in line of battle shortly after 3 a. m., until half an hour after sunrise; company drill for an hour in the forenoon, the first drill since the Regiment returned to Virginia; Regiment went on picket in the evening.”65

 

August 5, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket near Ware Bottom Church; no firing between the pickets, but some shots were fired from a battery of the enemy near the Howlett house at some boys bathing in the James River; Regiment relieved in the evening by the 16th New York Heavy Artillery; heavy cannonading near Petersburg.”66

 

August 6, 1864

  • “Regiment in camp during the day; company drill for an hour in the forenoon and again for an hour in the afternoon; perfectly quiet in front but incessant cannonading near Petersburg; an order read asking for 600 volunteers from the 10th corps for fatigue duty not to exceed 20 days; it is understood the duty required is to dig a mine near Petersburg.”67

 

August 7, 1864

  • “A beautiful summer day; general inspection at 9 a. m.; dress parade in the evening, after which there was preaching by the Rev. Pearce of the Christian Commission; this was the first sermon in the Regimental camp for a long time, and Lieut. Col. Campbell made it compulsory for every man not on duty to attend, under penalty of being placed in arrest for not turning out; prayer-meeting followed preaching; volunteers for fatigue duty ordered to report at corps headquarters tomorrow at 10 a. m.”68

 

August 8, 1864

  • “Regiment under arms at 3.30 a. m.; company drill for an hour and a half in the forenoon, and again for the same length of time in the afternoon; four companies of the Regiment went on picket in the evening; a number of the officers of the Regiment visited City Point, using a wagon as a conveyance.”69

 

August 9, 1864

  • “One hundred men detailed for fatigue duty at the fortifications in front during the forenoon; the order for volunteers for fatigue duty to appear at corps headquarters countermanded, owing to the entire quota required from the corps having been furnished by the 16th New York Heavy Artillery; a few minutes before noon an ammunition barge at City Point exploded, killing 12 enlisted men, 2 citizen employees, 1 citizen not employed by the Government and 28 colored laborers; wounding 3 commissioned officers, 4 enlisted men, 15 citizen employees, 86 colored laborers and 18 others, soldiers and citizens, not belonging at the wharf; Companies E, H and K were ordered on duty at the Landing after the explosion; company drill for an hour and a half in the forenoon and again in the afternoon for an hour and a half; Companies F, D and I went on picket in the evening; the four companies from the Regiment were relieved and returned to camp.”70

 

August 10, 1864

  • “The four companies in camp had company drill for an hour and a half in the forenoon and again in the afternoon; Companies F, D and I return from picket duty in the evening.”71

 

August 11, 1864

  • “Company drill in the forenoon for an hour and a half, and again in the afternoon, followed by dress parade; prayer-meeting in camp in the evening.”72

 

August 12, 1864

  • “Regiment in line of battle from 3 a. m. until after sunrise; company drill for an hour and a half during the forenoon; extremely hot day; Regiment went on picket in the evening.”73

 

August 13, 1864

  • “The last night for the Regiment to do picket duty in front of the Bermuda Hundred position near Ware Bottom Church; at 11 a. m. orders were received for the brigade to be in readiness to move at a moment’s notice, with three days cooked rations in haversacks, and ammunition in sufficient quantity to indicate a severe engagement was anticipated; the Regiment was relieved from picket duty, and other details returned to camp; tents were struck and the brigade lay in readiness until nearly midnight when the column moved towards the James River.”74
  • “The First and Second Brigades left the intrenchments in front of Bermuda Hundred at 11 p. m. for Deep Bottom.”75

 

August 14, 1864

  • “Arrived in the morning and found the Third Brigade already there. Attacked the enemy near the Kingsland road just after daybreak and carried the rifle-pits and intrenchments, taking 71 prisoners. In the afternoon a portion of the division again successfully attacked the enemy and captured a battery with four guns. At night moved to Strawberry Plains.”76
  • “Regiment crossed the James River on Pontoon-bridge about 2 a. m. and marched out to within a short distance of the picket line of Foster’s brigade, where it went into bivouac, the men lying on their arms in line of battle; shortly after the break of day, before the men had breakfasted, firing began on the picket line in the immediate front, and the Regiment was advanced as if to the support of the pickets; however, before reaching the picket line the Regiment was moved to the left of the position occupied by Foster’s brigade, and with the other regiments of Col. Howell’s brigade, charged the enemy’s works with cheers, carrying his rifle-pits and driving him into his main works on New Market Heights; during this charge the Regiment lost one officer, and two men killed, and ten men wounded; among the casualties were 1st Lieut. William T. Campbell, and Private Samuel H. Immel (Company K); Sergt. James R. Peters (Company E), instantly killed; among the wounded were Sergt. Jesse E. Jones, Company G, Corp. Crawford H. Scott, and Priv. James Minerd, Company I; 1st Sergt. Oliver H. Sproul and Private Paul Rankin, Company K; 1st Sergt. James A. Swearer, Company C; after capturing the enemy’s breast-works in advance of his main works, the men were allowed to take a rest and get breakfast; during the afternoon and early part of the night the Regiment made several short moves; it began to rain about dark and continued steadily during the fore part of the night thoroughly drenching the men.”77

 

August 15, 1864

  • “Advanced beyond Long Bridge road to Deep Run.”78
  • “The Regiment moved to the right about 1 a. m. and crossed Four Mile Creek, taking position to the right of the Second Corps near the crossing of the River and Quaker roads; about 9 a. m. moved up the latter road for two or three miles; from here, at 1 p. m., 100 men under Capt. Hughes were ordered to the front as skirmishers to support the pickets of the Second Corps, where they remained until after dark, returning to the Regiment between 8 and 9 o clock p. m.; during the afternoon, Private Dennis Farrell of Company A, was instantly killed, and Private Andrew Caleb Lynn, Company I, and Musician Lemuel Thomas, Company C, were mortally wounded, the latter living only until the following day; Lynn died August 21; Musician Thomas was assisting Surgeon Kurtz take care of the wounded; the latter was partially standing on one leg, with the other crossing it and with one arm, partially reclining on a tree; while in this position a solid shot or unexploded shell from the enemy s battery in front ricocheted, striking the heel of the shoe turned outward and thence to Musician Thomas head, knocking the latter unconscious; Surgeon Kurtz, although suffering great pain, immediately gave his attention to Thomas and remained continuously on duty; Major Abraham, and several men were wounded, among the latter were Sergt. Rinehart B. Church (Company F), Privates William W. Balsley (Company C) and Jackson Kimble (Company F); Com. Sergt. Bell issued two days rations to the men in the afternoon, while they were lying in range of the musketry fire of the enemy, the ‘zip’ of the balls being quite numerous at the time; towards evening, as he was returning to the south side of the James River, Gen. Grant and a solitary orderly passed him; just then the general espied a severely wounded man lying by the roadside; he immediately dismounted, and with the assistance of the orderly, carried the wounded man to the shade of a hemlock tree, then mounted his horse and continued his journey to the south bank of the James.”79

 

August 16, 1864

  • “Attacked and carried the enemy’s works at Deep Run, capturing about 300 prisoners and 6 battle-flags.”80
  • “This was the bloodiest day in the calendar of the 85th Regiment; the day broke cloudy and misty but extremely warm; at 9 a. m. the Regiment was ordered to move to the right and support a portion of Foster’s brigade, then engaging the skirmishers of the enemy; by the time the enemy’s skirmishers had retired within their fortifications the Regiment was about a half mile to the right of Fussell’s Mill and about 100 yards from the enemy’s works, concealed from the enemy by a dense wood; Foster’s men were then withdrawn and the 85th Regiment, on the right of Howell’s brigade under command of Col. Pond, charged the enemy’s main works, with a cheer carrying it, and capturing three stand of colors and over a hundred prisoners; the enemy being re-inforced and attacking the brigade on both flanks forced it to retire about 4 p. m., when it fell back some distance and threw up some rifle-pits, about 300 yards from the enemy’s position; in this charge 20 men were instantly killed, 12 mortally wounded, and between 40 and 50 more or less severely wounded; Capt. W. W. Kerr, Company A, was made prisoner of war; Capt. Lewis Watkins, Company E, and Capt. Levi M. Rogers, Company F, received death wounds, and Adjt. D. W. Shields, Capt. Geo. H. Hooker, and Lieut. A. S. Dial, Company B, and Lieut. E. A. Russell, Company F, were among the wounded.”81

 

August 17, 1864

  • “The Regiment occupied a position directly in rear of where it charged the enemy’s works the previous day; during the afternoon there was a truce for three hours to bury the dead; during the afternoon rations were issued to the Regiment.”82

 

August 18, 1864

  • “Attacked near Deep Run by the enemy, who were repulsed with loss.”83
  • “Nothing of importance occurred during the day, the Regiment remaining in same position it held the previous day; steady rain most of the day; about 9 p. m. the enemy advanced along the whole front driving in our pickets, but on receiving a steady fire along the whole line, soon retired, and the picket line was re-established in our front; Col. Howell having returned and assumed command of the brigade, early in the day was in his element during this attack, riding along the line in the darkness with cheering words to the men, as though it were a holiday amusement.”84

 

August 19, 1864

  • “About 1 a. m., the Regiment retired from its position and moved to a point near Malvern Hill, on the New Market road, where it went into bivouac,”85

 

August 20, 1864

  • “During the night the First and Second Brigades recrossed the James River and returned to the intrenchments in front of Bermuda Hundred, the Third Brigade returning to Deep Bottom.”86
  • “The Regiment remained near the New Market road not far from Malvern Hill, until shortly after dark, when it started to return to its former camp at Bermuda Hundred, crossing the James River on the pontoon-bridge at Jones Neck about 11 p. m.”87

 

 

August 21, 1864

  • “After an all night march the Regiment arrived at the Bermuda Hundred camp shortly after daybreak; the men, though tired, went to work with vim, putting their old camp in order; about dark orders were issued to be ready to move at a moment’s notice with one day’s rations in haversacks.”88

 

August 22, 1864

  • “About 1 a. m., the Regiment left the Bermuda Hundred camp and marched over to the bank of the Appomattox River; halted there, and after an hour’s rest returned to its former camp, arriving there before daybreak; nothing of importance occurred during the day, the men being permitted to rest in camp; orders were issued for the men to remain in camp to be in readiness for ‘any movement that may be directed’; orders issued to form line in trenches at 4 a. m.”89

 

August 23, 1864

  • “The Regiment was in line at trenches at 4 a. m., remaining there until a half hour after daybreak; general inspection at 2 p. m.; detail from the Regiment went on picket at 5 p. m.; all quiet in front; the enemy’s artillery keep up an incessant fire on the men working on Dutch Gap Canal.”90

 

August 24, 1864

  • “Orders issued to have everything in readiness to move at a moment’s notice after 12 m[eridian, aka noon].; struck tents and had everything in readiness to move by noon; detail on picket relieved at 6 p. m.; Regiment moved at 8 p. m., crossing the Appomattox River at Point of Rocks and continued on forced march towards Petersburg until midnight.”91

 

August 25, 1864

  • “Regiment, with the exception of picket detail, continues march until 1 a. m., when it arrives near Petersburg; relieves a Regiment of the 18th Corps on picket duty in the trenches at 4 a. m.; constant exchange of shots between pickets during day and night; also artillery fire.”92

 

August 26, 1864

  • “Clear morning; constant firing at front; 1st sergeants of Companies ordered to the rear to lay off camp; the site of the former camp of the 2d Pennsylvania. Heavy Artillery was selected, although in easy range of fire of the enemy’s pickets it is concealed from their view being in a woods; however, the bullets of the enemy are constantly zipping through the camp.”93

 

August 27, 1864

  • “Regiment in trenches and on picket; James Cairney and Joseph Banks of Company C were severely wounded by the same bullet, fired by a sharpshooter of the enemy, the bullet passing through Cairney’s body and lungs and then striking Banks; they had taken breakfast to the company on picket and were returning to camp when wounded; sharp artillery duel during the afternoon; Coehorn mortars are used quite freely; Regiment relieved after dark and returned to camp.”94

 

August 28, 1864

  • “An unusually heavy picket firing in our front at daybreak; Regiment formed in line of battle anticipating an attack; the day was pleasant; artillery and musketry fire was almost continuous throughout the day and night.”95

 

August 29, 1864

  • “Regiment under arms at daybreak; remained in camp until evening when it was ordered to the front for picket duty; our batteries bombarded Petersburg for some time during the fore part of the night.”96

 

August 30, 1864

  • “Constant exchange of shots between pickets during the night and day with no casualties in the Regiment; Regimental camp moved about half a mile to the left by the men who had been on camp guard and fatigue duty; Regiment remains on picket at the front.”97

 

August 31, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket; general cessation of hostilities along the picket line, the sentinels on both sides meeting each other and exchange papers, coffee and sugar for tobacco; Regiment relieved at dark and return to camp in new location; mustered for pay at 10 p. m.”98

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 1864

September 1, 1864

  • “Regiment called out at 4 a. m., standing in line of battle until half an hour after daybreak; while Henry K. Atchison, Company G, was working on the company muster-rolls in his tent an unexploded shell or solid shot of the enemy shattered one of his arms so badly that it had to be amputated near the shoulder; Col. Howell was assigned to the temporary command of the 3d Division of the 10th Corps during the sickness of Brig. Gen. William Birney; this division is comprised of colored troops.”99

 

September 2, 1864

  • “The Regiment was in line of battle at 4 a. m. (this being a standing order to govern the Regiment while in camp), remaining until a half hour after daybreak; a man of the 2d Corps, who deserted at Gettysburg was shot for desertion; he was recently captured serving in the Confederate army; Regiment went on picket at dark; nights cool and days hot.”100

 

September 3, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket; extensive bantering with enemy s pickets there being a tacit agreement not to fire on each other; however, constant firing continues on the right and left; Alexander Welsh, a recruit for Company A, arrived today; his brother, Joseph Welsh, was killed at Deep Bottom on August 16, but Alexander was not apprised of his brother’s death until he arrived at camp; some of the Regiment witnessed a rare army execution hanging; the victim of the gallows belonged to a regiment of the First Division, and had shot and killed a member of his regiment in battle against whom he held a grudge; he was detected, convicted by court-martial and expiated his crime at the end of a rope, his brigade witnessing the execution, forming three sides of a hollow square around the gallows.”101

 

September 4, 1864

  • “Regiment on picket; friendly relations still exist with the pickets in our front although there is a constant fire on the right and left; bartering continues; return to camp at dark; receive the cheering news of the capture of Atlanta.”102

 

September 5, 1864

  • “Regiment in line at 4 a. m.; remained in camp all day; the capture of Atlanta was celebrated in the evening by a terrific bombardment of Petersburg, all the batteries having range of the city participating, during which the martial bands rendered patriotic airs; the enemy threw a few shells into the Regimental camp; no casualties; heavy rain and thunder-storm shortly after dark.”103

 

 

September 6, 1864

  • “Day broke with a cold drizzling rain; Regiment remained in camp until dark when it went on picket, and in the reserve trenches; cold autumn rain during the night making it very disagreeable and uncomfortable; cars now running close to camp on track recently laid, and attract the fire of the enemy’s batteries.”104

 

 

September 7, 1864

  • “The Regiment on picket in trenches until the afternoon; when relieved moved camp into the Fourteen-gun battery (subsequently designated Fort Morton); raining during the night.”105

 

 

September 8, 1864

  • “Regiment in Fourteen-gun battery [soon to be Ft. Morton]; several companies encamping immediately in rear, protected from the enemy’s fire by bomb-proofs; rained during the night.”106

 

 

September 9, 1864

  • “Regiment remained in fort [Ft. Morton]; weather cloudy and misty with occasional drizzling rain; very little firing during forenoon; during the afternoon the enemy concentrated heavy artillery fire on the fort occupied by the Regiment without injury or casualties.”107

 

 

September 10, 1864

  • “Regiment lay in the fort; location of companies arranged; constant fire kept up by batteries on both sides; Sergt. George W. Ramage, Company I, slightly wounded.”108

 

 

September 11, 1864

  • “Regiment ordered to construct bomb-proofs in rear of the fort; the men devoted the day to this work; raining most of the time; President Lincoln ordered this day to be observed as one of Thanksgiving for the recent victories at Atlanta and Mobile Bay; Sergt. Jacob Deffenbaugh, Company I; Sergt. Howard Kerr, Company D; and Private George Orbin, Company C, returned to the Regiment, having been absent sick.”109

 

 

September 12, 1864

  • “Regiment still at Fourteen-gun battery (Fort Morton); the men continued working on bomb-proofs during the day in rear of the battery.”110

 

 

September 13, 1864

  • “Regiment still in Fort Morton; the men finish bomb-proofs in rear of the fort; Gen. Howell mortally injured by his horse rearing and falling on him as he was returning to his quarters from Gen. Birney s headquarters about 1 a.m.”111

 

September 14, 1864

  • “Regiment in Fort Morton; Col. Howell died at brigade hospital in the evening before dark; 12 men of Company A were detailed to serve as provost-guard at division headquarters.”112

 

 

September 15, 1864

  • “Regiment in Fort Morton; funeral services conducted at the brigade hospital by the Masonic fraternity at the remains of Col. Howell, the procession of the order from brigade headquarters was led by the band of the 39th Illinois Regiment.”113

 

 

September 16, 1864

  • “Regiment in Fort Morton; continues firing on the picket lines in front and some artillery fire concentrated on the fort, but no resultant casualties in Regiment; Dr. Howell, brother of Col. Howell, of Woodbury, New Jersey, arrived for the purpose of escorting the Colonel’s body home.”114

 

September 17, 1864

  • “Beautiful morning; the Regiment temporarily relieved of garrison duty and escorted the remains of Col. Howell to division headquarters; following the ambulance bearing the Colonel’s body was ‘Old Charley,’ the horse he brought from Camp LaFayette in 1861, and which he had ridden so often; Regiment returned to Fort Morton; Dr. Howell departed with the Colonel’s remains in the afternoon; ration returns indicated 281 men present.”115

 

 

September 18, 1864

  • “Pleasant autumn day; Regiment still at Fort Morton; no religious services of any kind in camp; orders issued to have things in order for regular monthly inspection; Capt. Rolla O. Phillips, Company D, left for Pennsylvania in an endeavor to get recruits sent to the Regiment; comparatively quiet in front.”116

 

 

September 19, 1864

  • “Regiment at Fort Morton; the first sergeants have joined in a petition to Gen. Grant to have the men of the Regiment mustered out at the expiration of three years from date of enlistment; Regiment inspected in the afternoon by the acting assistant inspector-general of the Third Brigade, First Division, Tenth Corps; Lieut. William H. Davis, who had been on special duty with Company I since May 22, returned to Company C.”117

 

 

September 20, 1864

  • “A private of Company C, convicted of theft by court-martial, had his head shaved, after which he was marched through the brigade camp, the band playing the ‘Rogue’s March’; orders issued for the men not to leave the fort; the petition to Gen. Grant asking that the men be mustered out at the expiration of three years from date of enlistment was presented at the headquarters of the general by Sergt. John B. Norris, Company B; this petition was received by Lieut. Col. Theodore S. Bowers, assistant adjutant-general, of Gen. Grant s staff, who notified Sergt. Norris that the petition would have to come through the proper channel, before it could have attention from the headquarters of the army.”118

 

 

September 21, 1864

  • “Regiment still at Fort Morton; immediately after daybreak all the batteries fired a salute in honor of a victory of Sheridan’s on September 19; first sergeants held a conference in reference to petition for discharge of the men at expiration of three years’ service; orders issued to have three days rations in haversacks and three in wagons; men anticipate early marching orders.”119

 

 

September 22, 1864

  • “Regiment at Fort Morton; petition forwarded to Gen. Grant through proper channel; Regimental commissary received two and a half barrels of onions and some pickles from the Sanitary Commission.”120

 

 

September 23, 1864

  • “Regiment at Fort Morton; detail constructing large bomb-proof in the fort by order of Lieut. Col. Campbell; men notified that the paymaster is expected daily.”121

 

 

September 24, 1864

  • “Regiment’s last day at Fort Morton; at 8 a. m. a salute was fired in honor of Sheridan’s victory in the Shenandoah valley; late in the afternoon received orders to pack up and prepare to leave; at 9 p. m. left Fort Morton and marched to within a short distance of corps headquarters and bivouacked for the night.”122

 

 

September 25, 1864

  • “Regiment near corps headquarters; laid out camp and pitched tents, just north of the road between City Point and Petersburg, the field in which the camp is pitched is bordered by a creek; the 10th Corps is apparently to be held in reserve as it has been relieved from duty at the front by the 2nd Corps, and is now concentrated near Gen. Birney’s headquarters.”123

 

 

September 26, 1864

  • “Regiment encamped along the road between City Point and Petersburg, near corps headquarters; orders to put bunks in tents; also to resume company drill six hours daily; company drill in the afternoon; Private James E. Sayers, Company F, promoted to 1st Sergeant and placed in command of the company, the commissioned officers all being absent; prayer-meeting in the evening, the first religious services in Regimental camp for some weeks.”124

 

 

September 27, 1864

  • “Regiment encamped between City Point and Petersburg; company drill during the forenoon; general inspection of the brigade in the afternoon; the petition forwarded to Gen. Grant requesting that the men be mustered out of the service at the expiration of three years from date of enlistment was returned by Gen. Birney disapproved; Chaplain Craig, 62d Ohio Regiment, held religious service in the camp of the 85th Regiment, preaching from Isaiah, Chap. 28, Verse 16: ‘Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation, a tried stone, a precious corner stone; a sure foundation.’”125

 

September 28, 1864

  • “Regiment left camp between City Point and Petersburg at 3 p. m., having received orders during the forenoon to be in readiness to move at that hour with two days rations in haversacks; crossed the Appomattox River at Broadway Landing, and the James River at Jones Landing, arriving at Deep Bottom about midnight where it went into bivouac.”126

 

 

September 29, 1864

  • “The Regiment was routed out shortly after 3 a. m., and after a hurried breakfast, and at the glow of dawn was in line of battle, and just as day began to break advanced over the same ground Howell’s brigade had charged over at New Market Heights on August 14. With very little resistance the Regiment, at the head of the brigade, advanced out the New Market road until it was within three miles of Richmond, without any casualties; later in the day it was ordered to retire, and it fell back to a fortified position about a mile west of Four Mile Run Church, near the Robinson house.”127

 

 

September 30, 1864

  • “The Regiment remained in same position it occupied after falling back from in front of Richmond near the Robinson house, and devoted the day in strengthening the fortifications; Com. Sergt. Bell arrived with commissary supplies at daybreak; in the evening he issued fresh bread, and about midnight issued another day’s rations; the men were pretty well soaked as it rained quite steadily during the night; Sergt. John T. Norris, Company C, was captured by the enemy.”128

 

 

 

October 1864

October 1, 1864

  • “The Regiment with the brigade, made a reconnaissance on the Darbytown road, to within three or four miles of Richmond without much opposition; this was a tiresome march, as the roads were muddy, and a drizzling rain falling continuously throughout the day and during the night.”129

 

October 2, 1864

  • “Regiment remained in bivouac during the forenoon; shortly after noon the enemy made an attack on the pickets but were readily repulsed and the Regiment, after standing in line of battle a couple of hours, was permitted to break ranks.”130

 

 

October 3, 1864

  • “No firing in front and the Regiment remained in bivouac throughout the day; O. F. Lyon, Company A, made an attempt to get Gen. Butler interested in having the men discharged at the end of their three years enlistment but got no satisfaction.”131

 

October 4, 1864

  • “Regiment receives shelter tents and pitched camp; Sergt. Sylvanus Hasson, Company K, (made an attempt to see Gen. Grant in reference to the muster-out of the men whose term of service had expired, but failed to get an interview; no firing in front but heavy cannonading on the left; Thomas Thompson, Company A, died in hospital at Fortress Monroe.”132

 

October 5, 1864

  • “Quiet in front; Regiment in line before daybreak; continue strengthening fortifications and improving conditions about camp ; daily details are made for picket duty from the Regiment; 199th Pennsylvania Regiment assigned to First Brigade, and ordered to garrison Deep Bottom fortifications.”133

 

October 6, 1864

  • “Conditions remain unchanged; during the day the knapsacks of the men were brought out to camp but were not distributed, and were taken to the rear without any explanation to the men; received two days rations.”134

 

October 7, 1864

  • “Regiment stood in line in anticipation of an attack from before daylight until an hour after daybreak; about ten o’clock the cavalry was driven back and Terry’s division was ordered to their support; the enemy was soon repulsed with heavy loss, the First Brigade following his retreating columns for about two miles; the Regiment had but four casualties, among whom were Private John S. Wagoner, Company C, wounded; Priv. Jeremiah Hartzell, Company E, wounded; Regiment in the advance on picket during the night.”135

 

October 8, 1864

  • “Shortly after daybreak the cavalry relieved the Regiment from picket duty and it took position inside the fortifications; signed pay rolls and are told will receive pay tomorrow; cool and windy during the day, and uncomfortably cold at night.”136

 

October 9, 1864

  • “Regiment returns to former position near Four Mile Run Church and strengthen fortifications, working until 9 p. m.; receive six months pay.”137

 

October 10, 1864

  • “Regiment improved conditions in camp; no firing in front; Peter A. Johns of Uniontpwn, Penna. arrived in camp bringing election papers for the Regiment; owing to illness of Gen. Birney, Gen. Terry assumed command of the Tenth Corps, and Brig. Gen. Adelbert Ames to the command of the First Division.”138

 

October 11, 1864

  • “Regiment in line of battle from 4.30 a. m. until after daybreak as usual; all quiet in front; this being election day for State officials and congressmen in Pennsylvania, an election was held in Regiment; 116 Republican and 60 Democratic votes were cast.”139

 

October 12, 1864

  • “Regiment in line at 4 a. m.; lay in camp during forenoon; about 2 p. m. received light marching orders with three days rations; at 4 p. m. Regiment moved out the New Market road some distance with the other regiments of the brigade, but soon returned to camp without meeting the enemy.”140

 

October 13, 1864

  • “Regiment routed out at 3 a. m. and by four o clock was marching over the same route covered the day before; moved with the division across the Darbytown road to the plains lying between it and the Charles City road, and advanced towards Richmond again; after several ineffectual attempts to carry the enemy’s works by the 10th Corps, the entire force retired, the Regiment reaching camp about dark; having eight light casualties; among the wounded were Pvt. David W. Baker, Company B, Pvt. George Rodeback, Company C, Sergt. C. E. Eckels, Company E; Corp. Nicholas Derbins, and Pvt. Jacob Huffman, Company F; M. F. Bradley and Samuel E. Johnson, Company I.”141

 

October 14, 1864

  • “Regiment received orders about 2 p. m. to report at Butler’s headquarters; started at 3 p. m., leaving the veterans who re-enlisted, and recruits in camp; arrived at Aiken’s Landing about sunset and bivouacked for the night.”142

 

October 15, 1864

  • “Crossed on pontoon bridge at Aiken’s Landing and march to Jones Landing and from there was ordered to Bermuda Hundred, where it embarked on the U. S. Steamer Ironsides at 3 p. m., and arrived at Jamestown Island about 9 p. m., disembarked and bivouacked for the night.”143

 

October 16, 1864

  • “Embarked on the transport Blackbird in the forenoon, reaching Norfolk about noon, and thence, without disembarking, across to Portsmouth; disembarked and marched through the town to the Whitehead Farm and bivouacked for the night.”144

 

 

 

October 17, 1864

  • “Pitched camp during the forenoon in a grove about a half mile west of Portsmouth, called Oak Forest.”145

 

 

October 18, 1864

  • “Remained at Oak Forest camp awaiting orders; Sergt. Swearer, who had been ill with chills and fever, was sent to U. S. General Hospital in Portsmouth.”146

 

 

October 19, 1864

  • “In Oak Forest camp awaiting orders; received two days rations; a number of the comrades attend colored church where 23 colored women presented a communion service set to the church; they had a musical treat, rendered by colored vocalists, male and female.”147

 

 

October 20, 1864

  • “In camp at Oak Forest grove awaiting orders.”148

 

 

October 21, 1864

  • “Awaiting orders at Oak Forest camp; a large number of the men attended the Norfolk Theatre at night to witness ‘The Pioneer Patriot’; Gen. Israel Vogdes is in command of the post; received two days rations.”149

 

 

October 22, 1864

  • No entry

 

 

October 23, 1864

  • “In Oak Forest camp awaiting orders.”150

 

 

October 24, 1864

  • No entry

 

 

October 25, 1864

  • No entry

 

 

October 26, 1864

  • “Lieut. Elmore A. Russell, Company F, and Marquis L. Gordon, Company G, received commissions today, the former as captain and the latter as lieutenant; they were not mustered.”151

 

 

October 27, 1864

  • No entry

 

 

October 28, 1864

  • “At Oak Forest camp awaiting orders; Surg. Sandt arrived in camp from the Army of the James.”152

 

 

October 29, 1864

  • “Awaiting orders at Oak Forest camp; 5 officers and 56 men were detailed to guard prisoners from Point Lookout, Md., to Pulaski, Georgia, the points at which prisoners were then exchanged.”153

 

 

October 30, 1864

  • No entry

 

 

October 31, 1864

  • “Awaiting orders at Oak Forest camp, mustered for pay by Lieut. Col. Campbell; the latter had a petition circulated addressed to Governor Curtin in which the signers agree to re-enlist provided that all the commissioned officers of the Regiment will tender their resignations; Sergeants George W. Ramage, Company I, Sylvanus Hasson, Company K; and Privates Isaac F. Overholt, Company B, and Joseph A. Demuth, Company D, signed it; prayer-meeting in camp in the evening.”154

 

 

November 1864

November 1, 1864

  • “Awaiting orders at Oak Forest camp, Portsmouth, Va.”155

 

November 2, 1864

  • “Awaiting orders at Oak Forest camp, Portsmouth, Va.; Lieut. Col. Campbell is having the names of engagements in which the Regiment participated inscribed on the Regimental colors.”156

 

November 3, 1864

  • “Regiment moved from Oak Forest camp to Norfolk, Va.; quartered in buildings in different parts of the City; headquarters on South Catherine Street; Companies A and F occupied Concert Hall on Talbot Street; the sick and convalescent remained in camp at Oak Forest; camp and garrison equipage turned in.”157

 

November 4, 1864

  • “No change in situation, except the sick, convalescents, and Regimental baggage were moved from Oak Forest camp to Norfolk.”158

 

November 5, 1864

  • “No further change in situation; a number of the Regiment attended the Opera House at night to see Charlotte Thompson in Camille.”159

 

November 6, 1864

  • “No change in situation; a number of the Regiment attended St. Paul’s Episcopal Union Church in the morning, and the Methodist Protestant Church at night; at the latter place they witnessed a marriage ceremony performed in the basement of the church; a white woman married to a negro soldier.”160

 

November 7, 1864

  • “No change in situation ; the Regiment doing provost duty in Norfolk, and well represented nightly at the Opera House.”161

 

November 8, 1864

  • “Regiment on provost duty in Norfolk; election day; Regiment polled 136 votes as follows: Lincoln 106; McClellan 30; the vote from Washington County was, Lincoln 40; McClellan 2.”162

 

November 9, 1864

  • “Regiment on provost duty in Norfolk; a number of the Regiment attended service at the Methodist Protestant Church at night.”163

 

November 10, 1864

  • “Regiment on provost duty in Norfolk; Sergt Geo. S. Fulmer, Company D, and Private Nathan Morgan, Company I, had a verbal altercation which ended without resort to physical violence.”164

 

November 11, 1864

  • “Provost duty in Norfolk; a number of the enlisted men had a heated verbal altercation with Lieut. Col. Campbell, due to the apparent indifference of the lieutenant-colonel in having the Regiment mustered out; the men all having served a considerable period over three years from date of enlistment, and many of them three years from date of the second muster, and no indications of being discharged; after the controversy the lieutenant-colonel started for department headquarters.”165

 

November 12, 1864

  • “Regiment on provost duty in Norfolk; paymaster arrived and paid the Regiment up to October 31.”166

 

November 13, 1864

  • “Regiment doing provost duty in Norfolk; groups of the Regiment attended service at various churches of Norfolk in the morning, afternoon and at night; the M. E. Church in Portsmouth was destroyed by fire, causing considerable excitement.”167

 

November 14, 1864

  • “Regiment on provost duty in Norfolk; Private Joseph Shell, Company A, was married to a Norfolk woman.”168

 

November 15, 1864

  • “Regiment on provost duty in Norfolk; Lieut. Col Campbell returned from department headquarters at the front with orders for the Regiment to proceed to Pittsburgh, Penna., there to be mustered out; on his return to Norfolk he ordered all the officers of the Regiment, with the exception of Lieut. Jacob Davis, placed in arrest.”169

 

November 16, 1864

  • “The Regiment was relieved from provost duty in Norfolk by the 1st U. S. Volunteers, and at 4 p. m., embarked on the Steamer Adelaide, the entire force being 176 enlisted men, commanded by but one line officer, 1st Lieut. Jacob Davis, Company E; the other commissioned officers having been placed in arrest by Lieut. Col. Campbell because of some disagreement were detained; as the Steamer Adelaide was leaving the dock at Norfolk, between 4 and 5 p. m., the men gave three lusty cheers for Quartermaster Beall and Surgeon Kurtz, who had come to witness the departure, followed by three groans for the lieutenant-colonel; the Adelaide touched at Fortress Monroe, leaving the dock at dusk; the men being under no restraint, a number of them became gleefully exhilarated by frequent visits to the bar of the vessel, and although the bay was quite calm the trip was exceedingly boisterous during a portion of the night.”170

 

November 17, 1864

  • “The Adelaide arrived at the dock in Baltimore at the break of day; the men immediately hurried to the railroad depot, in order to catch the first train going in the direction of Pittsburgh; they left Baltimore at 9:20 a. m., and arrived at Harrisburg at 2 p. m., and marched to the ‘Soldier’s Retreat.’”171

 

November 18, 1864

  • “The men remained at the ‘Soldier’s Retreat’ in Harrisburg until Friday evening, leaving at 6:20 p. m., on an accommodation train for Pittsburgh.”172

 

November 19, 1864

  • “The survivors of the Regiment who did not re-enlist and who were not absent on detached service, or otherwise absent, who left Uniontown, Penna., on November 20, 1861, arrived at Pittsburgh at daybreak Saturday, November 19, 1864; break fasted at old City Hall, and then went to the Girard House, on Smithfield Street, where they took their other meals, sleeping in an old warehouse at the corner of First Avenue and Smithfield Street, a dilapidated building minus several doors, without fire or gas, with an open elevator shaft as dangerous to some of the men who came in late at night as were the shells of the enemy in front of Petersburgh; during the day the men turned in their arms and accoutrements at the Allegheny Arsenal in Lawrenceville; some of the men left in the afternoon to visit their homes over Sunday; the officers who had been detained at Norfolk received orders to report at Harrisburgh, Penna., to be mustered out, and embarked on the Steamer Louisiana, for Baltimore; during the early part of the night the shaft of the steamer broke, and the vessel was helpless for six or seven hours having cast anchor; finally the Steamer Georgia came alongside, to which the passengers were transferred.”173

 

November 20, 1864

  • “The men took their meals at the Girard House and spent most of the day strolling about the city; although quite a number attended church services; a group went to the First Presbyterian Church in the morning, and to the Second Presbyterian in the evening; the officers who had been transferred to the Steamer Georgia arrived at Baltimore at 5 p. m., and at 7 :30 p. m. took train for Harrisburgh.”174

November 21, 1864

  • “First Sergeants engaged making out the muster-out rolls.”175

 

November 22, 1864

  • “A number of the officers arrived during the day, but Lieut. Col. Campbell and Adjutant Shields are absent; first sergeants working at muster-out rolls and discharges; the muster-out and discharges of all the officers and men whose term of service has expired date from November 22, 1864, although but very few received them on that date, the majority of them receiving them on November 23, and the others scattered along for the next fortnight.”176

 

 

SOPO Editor’s Note: Entries will be sparse to non-existent after November 22, 1864, as the Detachment of the 85th Pennsylvania which remained at the Siege of Petersburg served as the Provost Guard of 1/XXIV/AotJ from December 15, 1864 until a few months after active campaigning ended at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.

 

 

December 1864

December 15, 1864

  • Detachment 85th PA made Provost Guard of 1/XXIV/AotJ on December 15, 1864, and stayed in that role until July 1865.177

 

 

 

January 1865

No entries

 

 

February 1865

No entries

 

March 1865

No entries.

 

 

April 1865

No entries.

 

 

Sources:

  1. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  2. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  3. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  4. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  5. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  6. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  7. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  8. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  9. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  10. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  11. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  12. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  13. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 337
  14. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, pp. 337-338
  15. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 338
  16. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 338
  17. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 338
  18. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 338
  19. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  20. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  21. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  22. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  23. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  24. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  25. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  26. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  27. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  28. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  29. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 339
  30. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, pp. 339-340
  31. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 347
  32. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 347
  33. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 347
  34. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 347
  35. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  36. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  37. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  38. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  39. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  40. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  41. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  42. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  43. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  44. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  45. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  46. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  47. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  48. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  49. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 348
  50. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  51. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  52. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  53. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  54. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  55. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  56. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  57. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  58. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  59. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  60. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  61. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  62. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  63. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 349
  64. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, pp. 349-350
  65. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  66. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  67. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  68. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  69. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  70. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  71. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  72. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  73. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  74. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 350
  75. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  76. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  77. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  78. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  79. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 366
  80. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  81. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 366
  82. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 366
  83. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  84. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 366
  85. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 367
  86. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 365
  87. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 367
  88. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 367
  89. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  90. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  91. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  92. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  93. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  94. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  95. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  96. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  97. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  98. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 384
  99. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, pp. 384-385
  100. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  101. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  102. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  103. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  104. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  105. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  106. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  107. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  108. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  109. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  110. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  111. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  112. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  113. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 385
  114. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  115. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  116. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  117. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  118. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  119. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  120. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  121. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  122. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  123. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  124. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 386
  125. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 387
  126. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 387
  127. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  128. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  129. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  130. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  131. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  132. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  133. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  134. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  135. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  136. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  137. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 407
  138. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 408
  139. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 408
  140. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 408
  141. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 418
  142. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 418
  143. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, pp. 418-419
  144. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  145. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  146. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  147. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  148. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  149. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  150. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  151. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  152. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  153. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  154. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  155. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  156. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  157. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  158. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  159. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  160. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  161. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  162. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 419
  163. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  164. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  165. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  166. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  167. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  168. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  169. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  170. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  171. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  172. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  173. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 420
  174. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 421
  175. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 421
  176. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 421
  177. Dickey, Luther S. History of the Eighty-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865: Comprising an Authentic Narrative of Casey’s Division at the Battle of Seven Pines. J. C. & E. E. Powers, 1915, p. 414

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Lisa Fulton February 16, 2022 at 11:57 am

Brett – your material is tying together and mounting into a tour de force. Really great resource for all of us.

Brett Schulte February 16, 2022 at 3:15 pm

Lisa,

Thanks for the compliment and the support! I am working on a set of journal entries and letters from Colonel Samuel H. Walkup of the 48th NC next. He interacted with Gary’s Cavalry Brigade in the early days of the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign. His views on the 24th VA Cavalry match some some of those you’ve compiled. I thought of you while I was reading that.

Brett

Lisa Fulton February 18, 2022 at 4:03 pm

Oh that sounds good! I look forward to seeing the comments he made. I think I may have told you, my husband’s ancestors were in the 24th VA Cavalry – and we are still having fun arguing about who was to blame for those guns.

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