145th Pennsylvania Infantry

   

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Editor’s Note: Do you have information on this regiment’s role at the Siege of Petersburg?  Please contact us using the Contact button in the menu at the top of the screen.  We are happy to exchange information with other researchers.

Muster In: September 5, 18621
Muster Out: May 31, 18652

Commander(s):
Lieutenant Colonel David B. McCreary
David B. McCreary 145th PA3

Major Charles M. Lynch
Charles M. Lynch 145th PA4

Major George D. Pifer (53rd Pennsylvania)
Commander Image

Captain James H. Hamlin
James H. Hamlin 145th PA5

Captain Melvin H. Bemis
Commander Image

Captain Peter W. Free
Commander Image

First Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army6

  • Commander:
    • Lieutenant Colonel David B. McCreary (June 7-16, 1864)7
    • Major Charles M. Lynch (June 16-18, 1864)8
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons: Springfield Rifles (.58 caliber) (June 30, 1864)9

Second Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army10

  • Commander:
    • Major Charles M. Lynch (June 19-22, 1864)(captured June 22, 1864)11
    • Captain James H. Hamlin (from June 22, 1864)12,13
  • Unit Strength: ~75 officers and men PFD (June 23, 1864)14
  • Weapons: Springfield Rifles (.58 caliber) (June 30, 1864)15

Third Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army16,17

  • Commander: Captain James H. Hamlin (at least July 31, 1864)18,19
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army20,21

  • Commander: Captain James H. Hamlin (August 31, 1864)22,23
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army24

  • Commander:
    • Captain James H. Hamlin25
    • Captain Melvin H. Bemis (briefly in late September 1864)26
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army27

  • Commander:
    • Captain Melvin H. Bemis (October 31, 1864)28
    • Captain James H. Hamlin (?)29
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army30

  • Commander:
    • Captain James H. Hamlin (December 1-16, 1865 and possibly late December 1865)31
    • Major George D. Pifer (53rd Pennsylvania)(December 16-?, 1864)32
    • Captain Peter W. Free (December 31, 1864)33,34
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army35,36

  • Commander: Captain James H. Hamlin (January 31 & February 28, 1865)37,38,39
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle: Fourth Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army40,41

  • Commander: Captain James H. Hamlin (March 31, 1865)42,43
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Dyer’s Compendium Info:
Petersburg Campaign Battles44:

  • Before Petersburg June 16-18.
  • Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865.
  • Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1864.
  • Demonstration north of the James at Deep Bottom July 27-29.
  • Deep Bottom July 27-28.
  • Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve).
  • Demonstration on north side of the James at Deep Bottom August 13-20.
  • Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18.
  • Ream’s Station August 25.
  • Reconnaissance to Hatcher’s Run December 7-10.
  • Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865.
  • Watkins’ House March 25.
  • Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9.
  • Skirmishes on line of Hatcher’s and Gravelly Runs March 29-30.
  • Hatcher’s Run or Boydton Road March 31.
  • Crow’s House March 31.
  • Sutherland Station April 2.

Bibliography:

    Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

    Sources:

    1. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    2. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    3. Image used with the permission of 145th PA expert Patrick Knierman.  This CDV is from Mr. Knierman’s private collection and may not be reproduced without his written permission.  All rights reserved.
    4. Image used with the permission of 145th PA expert Patrick Knierman.  This CDV is from Mr. Knierman’s private collection and may not be reproduced without his written permission.  All rights reserved.
    5. Image used with the permission of 145th PA expert Patrick Knierman.  This CDV is from Mr. Knierman’s private collection and may not be reproduced without his written permission.  All rights reserved.
    6. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 219-220
    7. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “McCreary returned to the 145th on June 7th at Cold Harbor. He had been absent on recruiting duty since January. On June 16th, he led the 145th in its assault on Battery 14. When Colonel Beaver of the 148th PA (who was leading the brigade) was wounded, McCreary assumed command of the brigade, or at least what remained of it in the ditch before Battery 14. The men were outflanked and McCreary ordered them to surrender. His actions in surrendering the men caused Major General Hancock to order an investigation as to its propriety. McCreary spent the rest of the war as a POW in Macon and Charleston.”  Patrick has been studying the 145th Pa for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His sources on McCreary include Compiled Military Service Record, David B. McCreary, National Archives; A History of the 148th Pennsylvania Volunteers, J. Muffly; “Reminisces of the Civil War” Sgt. Stephen Osborn (Co. G, 145th PA); “Lost Colors of the Seventh Heavy Artillery” in Third Annual Report of the State Historian of the State of New York, 1897; 145th Pennsylvania Regimental Order and Letter book, National Archives.
    8. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Lynch managed to escape from in front of Battery 14 with a few men, although he suffered a bad bruise on the chest from a spent musket ball. He assumed command of the 145th and let it through the next few days. At Jerusalem Plank Road (or Strawberry Plains, or Williams Farm) on June 22nd, he was captured by troops from General Wrights Georgia Brigade. Lynch’s biography stated he was captured while fighting with sword in hand and would have been killed after capture but for the personal intervention of General Wright.  Lynch spent the next several months as a POW at Macon and Charleston until he was able to escape and made his way into union lines at Kingston, NC in March 1865.”  Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His sources on Lynch include Compiled Military Service Record, Charles M. Lynch, National Archives; Letter excerpts from QM Sgt. D.W. Winchester (145th PA), published in Erie Observer Newspaper, June 25, 1864. Biography of Charles M. Lynch, published in Nelson’s biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania,1896, author Benjamin Whitman.
    9. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 145th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 59; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    10. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 219-220
    11. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Lynch managed to escape from in front of Battery 14 with a few men, although he suffered a bad bruise on the chest from a spent musket ball. He assumed command of the 145th and let it through the next few days. At Jerusalem Plank Road (or Strawberry Plains, or Williams Farm) on June 22nd, he was captured by troops from General Wrights Georgia Brigade. Lynch’s biography stated he was captured while fighting with sword in hand and would have been killed after capture but for the personal intervention of General Wright.  Lynch spent the next several months as a POW at Macon and Charleston until he was able to escape and made his way into union lines at Kingston, NC in March 1865.”  Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His sources on Lynch include Compiled Military Service Record, Charles M. Lynch, National Archives; Letter excerpts from QM Sgt. D.W. Winchester (145th PA), published in Erie Observer Newspaper, June 25, 1864. Biography of Charles M. Lynch, published in Nelson’s biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania,1896, author Benjamin Whitman.
    12. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), page 543
    13. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ” Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His source on Hamlin is the  Compiled Military Service Record, James H. Hamlin, National Archives.
    14. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). ”  Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His source on this strength figure comes from unattributed newspaper accounts published in Erie Weekly Gazette, Erie Daily Dispatch, and Erie Observer newspapers in late June, early July 1864.
    15. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 145th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 59; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    16. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 252
    17. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 730
    18. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    19. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 730
    20. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 613: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
    21. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 117, 129: “Return of Casualties in the Union Forces (August 1864)”
    22. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 613: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
    23. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    24. Sommers, Richard J. “Grant’s Fifth Offensive at Petersburg: A Study in Strategy, Tactics, and Generalship.  The Battle of Poplar Spring Church, the First Battle of the Darbytown Road, the Second Battle of the Squirrel Level Road, the Second Battle of the Darbytown Road (Ulysses S. Grant, Virginia).” Doctoral Thesis. Rice University, 1970. Print. p. 1298.
    25. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    26. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Bemis was captain of Company C of the 145th and commanded the 145th briefly in late September 1864 while Hamlin was absent.”  Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His source on Bemis is Compiled Military Service Record, Melvin H. Bemis, National Archives
    27. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 459: “Organization of the Union Forces” (October 31, 1864)”
    28. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 459: “Organization of the Union Forces” (October 31, 1864)”
    29. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    30. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 1115: “Organization of the Union Forces” (December 31, 1864)
    31. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    32. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Pifer was assigned to command the 145th on December 16, 1864 to “restore order and discipline”. He served for a couple of weeks until Hamlin returned to the regiment.”  Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His source on Pifer is the 145th Pennsylvania Regimental Order and Letter book, National Archives.
    33. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 1115: “Organization of the Union Forces” (December 31, 1864)
    34. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Free was captain of Company H of the 145th. He commanded the 145th briefly in November 1864 while Hamlin was absent on detached service and Bemis was out on sick leave.” Patrick has been studying the 145th PA for over 20 years, and contributed to a 2 volume history of the regiment.  His source on Free is Compiled Military Service Record, Peter W. Free, National Archives.
    35. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 325: “Organization of the Union Forces” (January 31, 1865)
    36. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 739: “Organization of the Union Forces” (February 28, 1865)
    37. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 325: “Organization of the Union Forces” (January 31, 1865)
    38. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 739: “Organization of the Union Forces” (February 28, 1865)
    39. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    40. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 566: “Organization of the Union Forces” (March 31, 1865)
    41. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 582: “Return of casualties in the Union Forces commanded by Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, March 29-April 9, 1865”
    42. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 566: “Organization of the Union Forces” (March 31, 1865)
    43. Information courtesy of 145th expert Patrick Knierman, who writes: “Hamlin was captain of Company I of the 145th and the senior officer left with the remains of the 145th  (about 75 officers and men). He would lead it for most of the rest of the war, except for a couple of brief periods in the fall and winter when he was assigned to court martial duty. ”
    44. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)

    ***



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