125th New York Infantry

   

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in New York Infantry

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Muster In: August 29, 18621
Muster Out: June 5, 18652

Commander(s):
Colonel Levin Crandell
3

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Lt. Colonel (Colonel) Joseph Hyde
4

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Captain Joseph Egolf
5

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Captain Nelson Penfield
6

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Lieutenant Albert Reynolds
Commander Image Needed

First Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army7

Second Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army10

Third Offensive Order of Battle: Consolidated Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army14,15

  • Commander: Captain Nelson Penfield (July 31, 1864)16
  • Unit Strength: ~133 PFD (July 30, 1864).17
  • Weapons:

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle: Consolidated Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army18,19

  • Commander:
    • Lt. Cololonel Joseph Hyde 20
    • Captain Joseph Egolf (Ream’s Station August 25, 1864)21
    • Lieutenant Albert Reynolds (August 31, 1864)22
  • Unit Strength: >140 men (August 8, 1864) 23
  • Weapons:

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle: Consolidated Brigade | First Division | II Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army24

  • Commander: Captain Nelson Penfield?25
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Captain Nelson Penfield?26
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Colonel Joseph Hyde27
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Colonel Joseph Hyde28
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Commander: Colonel Joseph Hyde29
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Dyer’s Compendium Info:
Petersburg Campaign Battles30:

  • Before Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865.
  • Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23, 1864.
  • Demonstration on north side of the James July 27-29.
  • Deep Bottom July 27-28.
  • Demonstration north side of the James August 13-20.
  • Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18.
  • Ream’s Station August 25.
  • Reconnaissance to Hatcher’s Run December 9-10.
  • Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865.
  • Watkins’ House March 25.
  • Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9.
  • On line of Hatcher’s and Gravelly Runs March 29-30.
  • White Oak Road March 31.
  • Sutherland Station and fall of Petersburg April 2.

Bibliography:

Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

Sources:

  1. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
  2. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
  3. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, after page 146
  4. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 261
  5. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 244
  6. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 250
  7. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 219-220
  8. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 222, 229
  9. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 125th New York Entry, Page 2; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
  10. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 219-220
  11. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 222, 229
  12. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), page 543
  13. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 125th New York Entry, Page 2; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
  14. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 252
  15. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 729
  16. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 729
  17. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 238: Simons mentioned that out of 400 men available on May 4, 1864, and after receiving some reinforcements during the Overland Campaign, was now “smaller by two-thirds than at its beginning.”  One third of 400 is 133 or so men, so it can be assumed that as of July 30, 1864, the regiment had around than 133 men and officers PFD.
  18. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 612: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
  19. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 117, 129: “Return of Casualties in the Union Forces (August 1864)”
  20. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 243: Hyde was more than likely commanding the 125th NY during the Battle of Globe Tavern in mid-August (not confirmed or mentioned), but he was temporarily in charge of the Consolidated Brigade at Ream’s Station on August 25, 1864 because Colonel Crandell was the Division Officer of the Day in charge of the picket line.
  21. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 243: Lt Colonel Hyde was temporarily commanding the brigade, so Captain Egolf was temporarily commanding the regiment.  He was wounded at Second Ream’s Station and lost his arm.
  22. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 612: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
  23. A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 353: Writing on August 8, 1864, Captain Nelson Penfield reports “The regiment left Stevensburg with 365 men; we have now 140 left; to this number some have been added on the march…”  (Ed. Note: I am unsure if this refers to enlisted men only or officers as well.  In A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, on page 238, Ezra Simons mentioned that the regiment left Stevensburg with 400 total, so this implies Penfield is referring only to enlisted men and omitting his non-commissioned and commissioned officers.
  24. Sommers, Richard J. “Grant’s Fifth Offensive at Petersburg: A Study in Strategy, Tactics, and Generalship.  The Battle of Poplar Spring Church, the First Battle of the Darbytown Road, the Second Battle of the Squirrel Level Road, the Second Battle of the Darbytown Road (Ulysses S. Grant, Virginia).” Doctoral Thesis. Rice University, 1970. Print. p. 1298.
  25. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 250: Captain Nelson Penfield commanded the regiment after Ream’s Station.  However, the text does not state for how long.  It seems as if Penfield commanded the regiment until Colonel Hyde assumed command in “late” 1864.  Colonel Crandell commanded the Consolidated brigade at this time.
  26. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 250: Captain Nelson Penfield commanded the regiment after Ream’s Station.  However, the text does not state for how long.  It seems as if Penfield commanded the regiment until Colonel Hyde assumed command in “late” 1864.  Colonel Crandell commanded the Consolidated brigade at this time.
  27. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 261, 279: Colonel Joseph Hyde commanded the 125th New York from late in 1864 through the last campaign of the war in 1865.  He was apparently promoted to a full colonel on the day he was placed in charge of the regiment.  No specific date was mentioned, but it has been assumed that Hyde was in command by mid-December 1864.
  28. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 261, 279: Colonel Joseph Hyde commanded the 125th New York from late in 1864 through the last campaign of the war in 1865.  He was apparently promoted to a full colonel on the day he was placed in charge of the regiment.  No specific date was mentioned, but it has been assumed that Hyde was in command by mid-December 1864.
  29. A Regimental History: The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth New York State Volunteers, page 261, 279: Colonel Joseph Hyde commanded the 125th New York from late in 1864 through the last campaign of the war in 1865.  He was apparently promoted to a full colonel on the day he was placed in charge of the regiment.  No specific date was mentioned, but it has been assumed that Hyde was in command by mid-December 1864.
  30. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)

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