7th South Carolina Battalion Infantry

   

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in South Carolina Infantry

Editor’s Note: Do you have information on this unit’s role at the Siege of Petersburg?  Please contact us using the Contact button in the menu at the top of the screen.  We are happy to exchange information with other researchers.

Muster In: Organized with five companies on February 22, 1862.  Three more companies assigned in 1862.1
Muster Out: April 26, 18652

Commander(s):
Lieutenant Colonel Patrick H. Nelson
Commander Image

Major James H. Rion
Commander Image

Captain John L. Jones
Commander Image

Captain Dove Segars
Commander Image

Commander 5
Commander Image

First Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia | Confederate Army3

  • Commander:
    • Major James H. Rion (at least June 16-19, 1864)(wounded June 19, 1864)4,5
  • Unit Strength: ~500 officers and men PFD (June 16, 1864)6
  • Weapons: Enfield Rifles (June 18, 1864)7

Second Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia | Confederate Army8

  • Commander:
    • Major James H. Rion (June 19, 1864)(wounded June 19, 1864)9
    • Lieutenant Colonel Patrick H. Nelson (June 19-24)(killed on June 24, 1864)10,11,12
    • Lieutenant John L. Jones (June 24, 1864 on)13
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Third Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia | Confederate Army14

  • Commander: Lieutenant John L. Jones15
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia | Confederate Army16

  • Commander:
    • Captain John L. Jones (at least August 20-21, 1864)(captured August 21, 1864)17,18,19
    • Captain Dove Segars (August 21, 1864)20
    • Lieutenant Colonel James H. Rion21
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia | Confederate Army22,23

  • Commander: Lieutenant Colonel James H. Rion24
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Fourth Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army25

  • Commander: Lieutenant Colonel James H. Rion26
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle: Hagood’s Brigade | Hoke’s Division | Fourth Corps | Army of Northern Virginia | Confederate Army27,28

  • Commander: Lieutenant Colonel James H. Rion (November & December 1864)29,30
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:
  • Note: Left the Siege of Petersburg sometime in December 1864.31

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Not at Siege of Petersburg.32

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Not at Siege of Petersburg.33

Dyer’s/Sifakis’ Compendium Info:
Siege of Petersburg Battles34:

  • Petersburg Siege (June 1864-April 1865)
  • Weldon Railroad (August 21, 1864)
  • 2nd Fort Harrison (September 30, 1864)

Bibliography:

    Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

    Sources:

    1. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia by Stewart Sifakis, pp. 74-75
    2. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia by Stewart Sifakis, pp. 74-75
    3. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., p. 114
    4. The Slaughter at Petersburg.” Charleston (SC) News and Courier. July 25, 1897, p. 9 col. 1-4: “Colonel Rion who usually made these reports was wounded on the 19th of June.  These forts were held by the 7th battalion under Major James H. Rion.”…”Just after midday (on June 19th) (Rion) was wounded in the left forearm, and brought in his skirmishers. I applied the tournequet for him, and bandaged his arm, and he went to the hospital.”
    5. In the Trenches of Petersburg.” Winnsboro (SC) News and Herald. March 19, 1901, p. 1 col. 1-4: “At noon on the 15th Smith’s corps of the Federal army was before the eastern defense of Petersburg. Hagood’s brigade reached the city at dark, while hurriedly being marched through the city. The whole town was in an uproar from excitement as we passed through; the streets were thronged with frightened women and children. As we moved on some one called out, “What brigade is that?” Col. Rion, at the head of the Battalion, answered, “Hagood’s South Carolina brigade.” Down they went on their knees, crying, “Thank God, we are I safe now; Hagood’s brigade has saved us twice before!”
    6. The Slaughter at Petersburg.” Charleston (SC) News and Courier. July 25, 1897, p. 9 col. 1-4: “The 7th, under Colonel Rion, was in front and nearest to Petersburg. Towards evening, Major Ed. Willis, of the Quartermaster’s department, came along from Richmond with an engine, tender, and two cars. He called for two companies of volunteers from the brigade to go to Petersburg. Colonel Rion stepped out and said: “The whole battalion will go.” He directed me to put the eight companies, comprising some 500 men, on the train.”…”At length they came within ten or fifteen yards as Mr. Alley says, and the Major straightened himself, “Rear rank, ready! Aim, fire!” Then, “Front rank, ready! Aim, fire!” I extended the orders to Captain Jones, and 250 Enfield rifles of each rank spoke at each command with one voice.”
    7. The Slaughter at Petersburg.” Charleston (SC) News and Courier. July 25, 1897, p. 9 col. 1-4: “At length they came within ten or fifteen yards as Mr. Alley says, and the Major straightened himself, “Rear rank, ready! Aim, fire!” Then, “Front rank, ready! Aim, fire!” I extended the orders to Captain Jones, and 250 Enfield rifles of each rank spoke at each command with one voice.”
    8. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., p. 114
    9. The Slaughter at Petersburg.” Charleston (SC) News and Courier. July 25, 1897, p. 9 col. 1-4: “Colonel Rion who usually made these reports was wounded on the 19th of June. ”
    10. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., p. 114
    11. The Slaughter at Petersburg.” Charleston (SC) News and Courier. July 25, 1897, p. 9 col. 1-4: “Colonel Nelson was absent, and did not return until the 19th. He was killed five days afterwards, on nearly the same field.”
    12. In the Trenches of Petersburg.” Winnsboro (SC) News and Herald. March 19, 1901, p. 1 col. 1-4: “”
    13. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., p. 114
    14. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 124
    15. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 124
    16. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 134
    17. Battle of Ream’s Station.” Winnsboro (SC) News and Herald. May 3, 1905, p. 1 col. 1-4: “Capt. J.L. Jones, of Liberty Hill, being the senior officer present was in command of the battalion.”
    18. Jones was captured at Globe Tavern on August 31 according to the muster roll of the battalion for August 31, 1864.
    19.  The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 134
    20. Battle of Ream’s Station.” Winnsboro (SC) News and Herald. May 3, 1905, p. 1 col. 1-4: “Capt. Segurs, now in charge of the battalion, returned from the right to the left and asked Thomas what was the matter over there on the left. ”
    21. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 134
    22. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 142
    23. Sommers, Richard J. “Grant’s Fifth Offensive at Petersburg: A Study in Strategy, Tactics, and Generalship.  The Battle of Poplar Spring Church, the First Battle of the Darbytown Road, the Second Battle of the Squirrel Level Road, the Second Battle of the Darbytown Road (Ulysses S. Grant, Virginia).” Doctoral Thesis. Rice University, 1970. Print. p. 1314.
    24. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 142
    25. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 147
    26. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 147
    27. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 155
    28. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 167
    29. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 155
    30. The Confederate Order of Battle, Volume 1: The Army of Northern Virginia by F. Ray Sibley, Jr., page 167
    31. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia by Stewart Sifakis, pp. 74-75: Sifakis does not list the exact date.  More research is needed.
    32. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia by Stewart Sifakis, pp. 74-75
    33. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia by Stewart Sifakis, pp. 74-75
    34. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia by Stewart Sifakis, pp. 74-75

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