Number 362. Petersburg Campaign Reports of Major General Bushrod R. Johnson, C. S. Army, commanding Johnson’s division

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

No. 362. Reports of Major General Bushrod R. Johnson, C. S. Army, commanding Johnson’s division.1

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va, August 2, 1864.

COLONEL: Colonels Goode, McAfee, and McMaster, commanding respectively Wise’s, Ransom’s, and Elliott’s brigades, report nothing of interest along their lines during the past twenty-four hours. General Gracie reports that work on the cavalier is progressing slowly, owing to the sickness of Lieutenant Welch, engineer officer, and requests that another engineer officer be assigned to his line; he also reports that as the engineers seem unconcerned about countermining

on his line to meet those of the enemy, he has sunk three shafts himself, but is making slow progress, as he cannot procure the instruments for boring. The casualties for July 30 will be forwarded in the morning.

The following casualties for the past twenty-four hours are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 6; total 7 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va. August 3, 1864

COLONEL: Brigade commanders report the usual picket-firing along the line during the last twenty-four hours. General Gracie requests the presence of an engineer officer on his line, if only to instruct the officer in charge of fatigue party. A private named Thomas Fowler, Company I, Forty-first Alabama Regiment, has invented a boring instrument to feel for the enemy’s mine. It bores ten feet in fifteen minutes. The following is a description of the Fowler border as given by General Gracie:

A simple cylinder of iron, about eight to ten inches long and three inches in diameter, slightly flared at the end, fastened to a pole ten feet long, to which a rope of twenty to twenty-five feet is attached. There should be a slit about a half inch wide on the side to push out the dirt, in case of it caking inside. Three to four holes should be made toward the upper end for the border to allow water and air to escape through. I believe it would be well to cup the border on the inside as illustrated in Figure III, when working in loose wet soil, although I have not yet tried it. Any one can work the tool simply by commencing a hole with a pick, and then forcing the tool down the hole. Every time it is drawn up earth or sand will be found in the cavity, which, if sand, can be easily knocked out, or, if clay, may have to be forced out,by a stick or a bayonet as used by the men, through the slit. The great objection to the border is the noise it makes. There is a man in the brigade who says he can make an auger that will work rapidly. I will order him to make one.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 5. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 3 (1 carelessly); Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, killed, 2; total, 2 killed, 9 wounded.

Total following ordnance stores have been collected during the past twenty-four hours: 4,315 minie-balls, 20 round shot, 41 grape-shot, 16 fuses, 16 pounds lead, and 45 shells.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
August 4, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report during the past twenty-four hours. Fatigue parties are constantly at work on the covered ways, &c., that have been ordered. I see from Northern accounts that our mortar and picket-fire is very destructive to the enemy, as they

admit that they have no protection especially in the Ninth Corps, which is in my front. I have ordered a brisk picket-line to be kept up along my line, and would suggest that the mortars be ordered to do likewise.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 3. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 3. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 7 (mortally, 2.). Total, 1 killed, 13 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
August 5, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. No increase or diminution has been noticed in the picket-firing. The enemy threw a few mortar shells yesterday without inflicting much injury. The following ordnance stores were collected yesterday: 32 solid shot, 7,530 minie-balls, 33 rifle shell, 140 fragments, 15 bayonets, and 9 guns.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded 1 (since dead). Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 4 (1 mortally). Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2. Total, 1 killed, 8 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, August 6, 1864

COLONEL: Colonel McAfee, commanding Ransom’s brigade, reports no change in the disposition of the enemy’s forces in his front. The picket-firing has been very heavy in front of the right regiment of his brigade. The firing was heaviest from dark until 10 p.m. from that portion of the enemy’s line this side of the railroad. Not a shot could be drawn by our fire when the mine was sprung in front of General Gracie’s line, and the enemy’s pickets ran into their main line. General Gracie reports that the destruction occasioned by the mine was very slight.

Not a gabion or sap-roller was displaced, nor much of a crater formed. The mine must have been badly tamped as the gallery was destroyed as far back as the shaft. Our picket-line was partially filled up, but again dug out.

Details for fatigue duty are regularly made. Work on the line and covered ways is progressing as well as could be expected.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 3. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 3. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1;wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, wounded 8. Total, 1 killed, 16 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 7, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report during the past twenty-four hours. The picket and mortar fire has been about as brisk as usual. General Gracie thinks the enemy have greatly strengthened their picket-line since the explosion of the mine on the 5th. He also has noticed the enemy at work near Taylor’s house, probably making an inclosed work, so as to hold their position with fewer men. Experiments have been made along the front of all the brigades, but no mine has yet been discovered.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded 2; total, 5 wounded.

Very respectfully, &c.

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’ DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 8, 1864.

COLONEL: Picket-fire was quite brisk yesterday, but slackened toward evening. The enemy were again observed yesterday strengthening the heavy battery in front of Ransom’s brigade. Colonel McAfee, commanding Ransom’s brigade, reported about 11 o’clock last night that he had struck a piece of timber with one of his borers, supposed to be the frame of an enemy’s mine; upon close inspection it proved to be a rock. The work is progressing well along the line.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded,3. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 3. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed; 1, wounded, 1. Total, 2 killed, 8 wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, August 9, 1864.

COLONEL: The picket and mortar fire on my line was quite brisk yesterday from 10 a.m. until dark, when it slackened. Colonel McAfee thinks our mortar fire was quite destructive to the enemy yesterday evening. The enemy are strengthening the battery in the apple orchard. Wells are being sunk along the line, and have reached water in all instances. Colonel Goode, commanding Wise’s brigade, reports that he has strengthened his line very much by traverses.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 3. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1. Total, 1 killed and 8 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

[Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.]

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 10, 1864.

COLONEL: The usual amount of picket-firing was kept up yesterday. The mortar fire has slackened. General Gracie reports that the enemy shelled his line with only two mortars yesterday evening, where they have usually used five. The fire from artillery was weak. Commanding officers of Wise’s and Ransom’s brigades report no perceptible change in position or strength of the enemy. The enemy are erecting a battery on the line in front of Wise’s brigade, which will bear on Wright’s battery. Colonel Goode reports that his sharpshooters have annoyed the working parties very much.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 3; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2 (1 mortally), Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; total, 7 wounded.

Very respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, August 11, 1864.

COLONEL: There is nothing of interest to communicate this morning. Mortar and picket firing has been kept up about as usual. Commanding officers of Ransom’s and Wise’s brigades report that no change has been observed in the position or strength of the enemy. They are strengthening the heavy battery in the orchard. Listening tubes have been sunk at small intervals along the lines. Water has been found in all instances, varying from seventeen to twenty-five feet below the surface.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 3; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 3 (1 mortally); Elliott’s brigade, killed 1; total, 1 killed, 6 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 12, 1864.

COLONEL: Nothing of importance has occurred since last return. Picket and mortar fire has been about as usual. Colonel McAfee, commanding Ransom’s brigade, reports that the enemy are throwing out obstructions in front of their second line, which seems to be very strong. All work is progressing rapidly. No change has been noticed in the position or strength of the enemy.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded 3 (1 mortally). Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1;wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed 1; wounded, 1. Total, 2 killed, 5 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 13, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing except casualties to report this morning, unless I would repeat my report of yesterday in regard to work on the lines sinking of wells, &c. The picket-fire was very brisk in front of Wise’s brigade last night.

The following casualties have occurred in the past twenty-four hours; Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 5. Gracie’s brigade, wounded 7. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Total 2, killed 15 wounded.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 14, 1864.

COLONEL: Picket and mortar fire has been about as brisk as usual during the past twenty-four hours. Colonel Goode, commanding Wise’s brigade, ordered his pickets to fire by volley several times last night in order to draw the fire of the enemy and judge of their strength. The fire of the enemy was drawn, but did not seem so strong as ours. General Gracie thinks the enemy have removed some of their mortars, or at least do not reply as formerly. The rumbling of wagons was also heard in front of his line last night. The enemy have placed palisades in front of their lines opposite to Ransom’s brigade.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 3 (1 mortally). Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded 1. Total 2 killed, 8 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, August 15, 1864.

COLONEL: Brigade commanders, especially of Elliott’s and Ransom’s brigades, are using every effort to discover the mines of the enemy, if they have any; but so far their efforts have been unsuccessful. Colonel McAfee, commanding Ransom’s brigade, reports that he cannot draw the water from the artisan holes with the pipes, as one is too short and two are too long. He suggests that gutta-percha pipes be furnished. The picket-fire was quite weak yesterday, but last night became more brisk and rapid than usual. General Gracie reports the rumbling of wagons last night. No change in the strength or position of the enemy has been observed.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 4 (1 mortally); Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; total, 1 killed, 4 wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 16, 1864.

COLONEL: The picket and mortar fire was about as usual during the past twenty-four hours. No change in the position of the enemy has been observed. During the storm yesterday the branch on Gracie’s line swept over the works, carrying away a portion of the parapet, filling up bomb-proofs, &c. He thinks the enemy were more inconvenienced than himself, as they were seen to avoid their covered ways, and in several instances exposed their persons to avoid the water in the trenches. A portion of Ransom’s line was also carried away, but is being rapidly repaired.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded 3 (1 mortally), Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; total, 4 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., August 19, 1864.

The following casualties are reported for the last twenty-four hours (the morning report was sent up by General Gracie and a copy was not furnished to this office): Gracie’s brigade, wounded 2. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Total, 2 killed, and 8 wounded.

R. E. FOOTE.
Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.]

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 8, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing unusual to report this morning. The enemy fired very little from mortars and artillery last night, but sharpshooting was kept up briskly.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 3; Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; total, 1 killed, 5 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 9, 1864.

COLONEL: It was unusually quiet along my line yesterday and last night. A few shots were fired by the artillery yesterday morning. General Gracie reports that negro troops are in front of his line, except on the railroad.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 4; total, 4 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General

Colonel G. W. BRENT

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 10, 1864

COLONEL: There seemed to be an unusual stir among the enemy last night, moving of wagon trains, cheering of troops, &c. General Gracie says that the enemy informed him this morning that they were cheering over the old news-fall of Atlanta; they also informed him that the colored regiment in his front was from Pennsylvania, that it belonged to the Eighteenth Corps, and was the only colored regiment in the corps. According to their own report, “they are new nigglers, but well disciplined.” The position occupied by Blount’s battery has been damaged by the enemy’s fire and needs repairing this work is in the hands of the artillery. The ordnance officer has now been three weeks removing the 10-inch columbiad and mounting the 8-inch. It seems to me that this is a waste of valuable time, and if he will consult with me I can expedite the work. Private Joseph H. Jackson, Company I, Twenty-third South Carolina Volunteers, deserted to the enemy about 1 a.m. on yesterday.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1 wounded, 3. Total, 2 killed, 4 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 11, 1864.

COLONEL: The sharpshooting was heavier yesterday and last night than usual. The mortar fire was quite severe at different times during the day and night. No change has been observed in the position or strength of the enemy. The negro troops have been removed from General Gracie’s front, and he is now opposed by white troops, believed to be the Eighteenth Army Corps.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 4. Gracies’ brigade, wounded, 5. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Total, 2 killed, 10 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 12, 1864.

COLONEL: The enemy have been more quiet than usual during the past twenty-four hours. Very few cannon or mortars were fired yesterday. No change has been observed since last report.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 2; Wise’s brigade, killed, 2; total, 3, killed; 2 wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 13, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report during the past twenty-four hours. The picket and mortar fire has been about as brisk as usual. No change has been observed in the position or strength of the enemy since last report.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, killed, 2; wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 2. Total, 2 killed, 3 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 14, 1864.

COLONEL: The sharpshooting was heavier yesterday than it has been of some time. Nothing has occurred or been observed worthy of reporting. Details are constantly at work on my line, and it is being very much improved.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed 1; wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1. Total, 2 killed, 2 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 15, 1864.

COLONEL: With the exception of heavy cannonading yesterday nothing unusual has occurred along my front. The enemy have again placed negroes along Gracie’s front. This seems to be their custom when they desire to use their white troops to effect particular

movements at other points. The picket-line along Elliott’s salient has been extended so as to cover the crater and the piece of artillery thrown in front of the line by the explosion. I think the chief of artillery should be apprised of this fact, as the piece might now be brought in. Colonel Goode reports that Corpl. John b. Mize, Company H, [Ninth Virginia,] and Privates J. J. Johnson and William H. Mathews, Company G, Fifty-ninth Virginia Regiment, deserted to the enemy last night while on picket. He says that three more useless, ignorant, and cowardly men never disgraced the rolls of any regiment.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted; Wise’s brigade, wounded 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1; total, 3 wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 16, 1864

COLONEL; In obedience to instructions my command extended to the left yesterday any by 1 o’clock occupied the line of General Hoke. Nothing unusual has been reported. Negro troops are still in front of Gracie’s brigade. Colonel Rutledge reported about 1 o’clock last night that the officer in charge of our mine on Colquitt’s salient thought that he heard the enemy mining. I referred the matter to Lieutenant Postell, engineer officer. The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 3. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2, Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Total, 1 killed, 7 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va, September 17, 1864.

COLONEL: The fire from mortars and artillery was weaker than usual yesterday. The enemy’s pickets made quite a demonstration in front of Colonel Goode’s line last evening. They seem to be aware of the change of troops on this line, as they called over to our pickets, “Halloo! old Hoke’s gone over to the Weldon railroad. When do you expect to open the Weldon railroad? We are 100-days’ men. Our time is nearly out, and we are going home. We do not want to fight.” They probably obtained their information from the men who deserted from Colonel Goode’s picket-line night before last. Another man deserted from Wise’s brigade last night-Private Mackowicz, Company A, Forty-sixth Virginia-while on picket. I placed Colonel Rutledge, commanding Ransom’s brigade, in arrest last evening for permitting communication between men of his command and the enemy and neglect of duty.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 3; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; total, 1 killed, 3 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 18, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing unusual to report this morning. The enemy were very quiet yesterday. General Gracie reports that two men, Privates A. J. Ross, Company G, and C. B. Jordan, Company B, both of the Forty-third Alabama Regiment, deserted from his picket-line last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 3.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 19, 1864.

COLONEL; I desire to call [the] attention of the commanding general to the following facts:

First. The two-gun battery in rear of Gracie’s salient, and west of railroad, has been so altered by the artillery officer in command that the original object of its construction is entirely abandoned. It was located to fire into Gracie’s salient and to the left of it. It now fires into the ravine to the left of Gracie’s salient and bears up toward Colquitt’s salient, without bearing directly on it. I would recommend that the battery be made to conform to the original plan.

Second. I am satisfied that the frequent change of officers and men with our batteries on the lines has many disadvantages. Details which remain but a short time with a battery fail to learn all the bearings of their guns in reference to the enemy’s works, the positions of which are perhaps often unknown to officers and men, and the details seem to be only interested in serving out their tour and returning to repose, or perhaps idle pleasures in rear. In some of the batteries I have failed to find sentinels duly posted and on the alert to observe the movements of the enemy in front, and brigade commanders have had to send to the batteries instructions to fire on objects plainly in view. Each battery should keep the strictest watch on all the grounds in view within enemy’s lines. The artillery officers in command along my line rarely communicate with me or report their headquarters.

Third. Deserters report that about 1,000 of the enemy’s troops are engaged in cutting down the woods in front of Gracie’s salient to expose that salient to their batteries and lines on the hill beyond It is suggested that our artillery should be required to play upon that woods frequently, and at times perhaps with a concentrated fire. This seems to me an important matter.

Fourth. The 8-inch columbiad west of Norfolk railroad, after over four weeks’ delay in putting it up, is now without a proper sight or hawser, which should be immediately supplied. This gun had orders, until about three days past, not to fire. About 300 shots were fired at it deliberately by the enemy on Thursday last, and then the captain in command was told that if fired on he might reply deliberately. During this concentrated fire no battery of ours replied. I would respectfully request that this gun be immediately supplied with all necessary appliances, and that the gun shall be fired when the enemy is not firing on it, so as to get the range of the gun and its bearings, especially in regard to enfilanding the enemy’s works. For this purpose suitable officers should be posted on the right to watch the effect of its shots. This practice is the more necessary because it is manned by infantry that have never served such a piece of artillery. General Gracie reports that he can distinguish a work that the enemy are erecting on the hill in his front, supposed to be a battery.

Colonel Goode, commanding Wise’s brigade, reports that four men of the Forty-sixth Virginia, Regiment, viz, Privates Lewis Wilson, Company A; Thomas W. Mattox, B. T. Keesee, John E. Hodgese, Company C, deserted to the enemy last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Very respectfully,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 20, 1864.

COLONEL: The enemy’s fire was quite weak yesterday until about dark, when quite a brisk mortar fire sprang up, resulting in no damage to us, however. Captain Hurt, commanding the columbiad battery, reports that he opened on the enemy’s battery in orchard, with excellent. Out of five shots fired (all of which struck), two of them passed through an embrasure and exploded. I would respectfully request that our artillery, from Blount’s battery to the White House battery, shall be ordered to fire from each in turn, in succession, one gun every five minutes, on the enemy’s working parties in the woods running from the front of Gracie’s salient to the right (that is, our right).

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 21, 1864

COLONEL: The columbiad and mortars kept up and occasional fire yesterday; the musketry has been about as usual. This morning the enemy opened along my entire line with artillery. It is supposed that they feared an attack from us under cover of the dense fog. General

Gracie thinks that they were silenced by our batteries elevating their sights and firing at long range back into the enemy’s camp; the firing lasted about thirty-five minutes. Brigade commanders suggest that a ration of vinegar be issued to the command, as many cases of incipient scurvy have come under their notice.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 2. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 22, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing except the usual amount of shelling and sharpshooting to report. The columbiad carriage was struck yesterday and disabled; the gun was also struck at the muzzle and cracked. I think this gun should be repaired or replaced with another, as it is very useful to us, and annoying to the enemy. Colonel Goode reports that Private James H. Shide, Company F, Fifty-ninth Virginia Regiment deserted from his picket-line to the enemy last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded 3. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 4. Total, 1 killed, 8 wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’ DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 23, 1864

COLONEL: Brigadier-General Gracie reports that the enemy were working along his entire front yesterday, digging deep ditches in front of their rear lines. The sharpshooting was not so brisk as usual yesterday.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON, Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 24, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report during the past twenty-four hours. Three deserters came in last night in front of Wise’s brigade. They belonged to the Forty-eighth New York Regiment, Second Brigade, Second Division, Tenth Army Corps. They

reported that our batteries across the Appomattox River did great execution during the shelling day before yesterday, killing and wounding 50 or 60.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted; Wise’s brigade wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; killed, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1. Total, 1 killed, 5 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 25, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing to report this morning; sharpshooting and shelling was very weak yesterday. As my division will come out of the trenches and remain in reserve in a few days, I would suggest that a rear or second line with batteries, &c., be laid out in rear of my in reserve. By employing 400 men a day each man will only perform fatigue duty one day during the ten that he is in reserve.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 26, 1864.

COLONEL: The fire from the enemy was very weak yesterday. A gallery of the enemy was discovered yesterday in front of Elliott’s salient, supposed to be the gallery of the old mine exploded by the enemy on the 30th of July. Two deserters came in last night from the picket-post in front of Wise’s brigade. They belonged to the Second Brigade, Second Division, Second Army Corps. They had only been in service two weeks, and report that Grant is receiving a good many raw recruits.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 27, 1864.

COLONEL: Two deserters from the Second Army Corps came into my line last night. I regret to be compelled to report that three men from Wise’s brigade, viz, John. A. Tindall, Benjamin L. Tindall, and Richard

Waiscott, all of Company E, Forty-sixth Regiment Virginia Infantry, deserted to the enemy last night. General Gracie explored the gallery of the enemy’s mine yesterday. His report I have already forwarded.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 28, 1864

COLONEL: Nothing has occurred along my front worthy of reporting during the past twenty-four hours. The Second Corps U. S. Army is still in my front. A deserter from the Sixty-first New York Regiment came over this morning. He reports that Grant is receiving a good many recruits, but that they are very raw and would not do much service in battle. General Hoke is relieving my command.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; total, 2 killed, 1 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
September 29, 1864

COLONEL: I have the honor to report the following casualties in my command for the past twenty-four hours (these casualties occurred in rear of Elliott’s salient last night while the brigade was performing fatigue duty), viz: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 4.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., September 30, 1864.

COLONEL: The enemy opened musketry volleys twice upon the lines of Wise’s and Ransom’s brigades (the left of my command) last night at 10 and 11 o’clock, respectively. They, at the same time, threw up signals. It is supposed that the volleys were fired in order to call forth a response and find out the strength of our line. Colonel Goode, com-

manding Wise’s brigade, recommends that our batteries across the Appomattox be directed to fire upon the enemy when they make such demonstrations.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 6. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 1, 1864

COLONEL: The enemy fired a volley upon Wise’s and Ransom’s fronts about 5.30 o’clock last evening. This drew a fire from our line, and was kept up by both parties for about fifteen minutes. No great injury was sustained by either party. It appears from the statement of deserters that the enemy’s infantry line in my front is very weak. It appears that the usual picket-line is kept up, and the regiments from which they are taken are lying behind the rear lines of their fortifications in ravines or under the hills. Deserters also report that the larger portion of the Yankee army is believed to have crossed the James, and that the main part of the force on this side of the James have been moved to our right. It would thus appear that the two wings of the Yankee army are connected by a thin line behind fortifications, and if our forces could be concentrated on one wing, while the other was simply held in check the Yankee army might be disabled for further operations this campaign, and might perhaps be entirely driven back toward the Potomac. It is proper to state that although the artillery fire in my front seems to be diminished, there are still a good many guns on the enemy’s line.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 2; wounded, 3. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 3.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN M. OTEY,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 2, 1864.

COLONEL: As reported before, the enemy’s trains were running all night from City Point toward their left. I forwarded you last night the statements of the two deserters in regard to the weakness of their line in my front, &c. I have nothing of interest to report.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN M. OTEY,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October, 3, 1864.

COLONEL: My division extended as was directed yesterday. Colonel Goode relieved Mahone’s brigade on my right at 4 o’clock this morning, but up to 8 o’clock Colonel Weisiger, commanding Mahone’s brigade, had not moved out, as he declined to do so, not having received any orders. I immediately acquainted Colonel Palmer, assistant adjutant-general, of the fact. Brigade commanders report the movement of wagons and artillery trains last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 2. Gracie’s brigade, killed 1; wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN M. OTEY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 4, 1864.

COLONEL: Nothing worthy of note has transpired during the past twenty-four hours. Colonel Goode reports that the line which he now occupies, his right resting at Rives’ house is quite strong. He keeps out pickets night and day. The enemy’s pickets seem to be about as strong as ours. General Gracie reports an unusual beating of drums and blowing of bugles last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN M. OTEY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
October 5, 1864.

COLONEL: The firing which occurred about 7 o’clock last night was to my right, although my command suffered somewhat from the mortar fire which immediately followed the musketry volleys. Colonel McAfee, of Ransom’s brigade, who occupies Colquitt’s salient, suggests that the engineer officer be instructed to run a gallery from our mine in the direction of Taylor’s Creek.

The following casualties have occurred since last report: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 9. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 3; wounded, 3. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2. Total, 4 killed, 14 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN M. OTEY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 6, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report his morning. The enemy was unusually quiet along my front during the past twenty-four hours. Four deserters came into our lines last night. They belonged

to the First Brigade, First Division, Second Corps. They represent their infantry line in my front to be very weak, but their artillery, well posted and numerous. They represent that their officers were in constant apprehension of an attack, and made their men sleep with knapsacks and accouterments on.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully,your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
October 7, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report this morning. The usual amount of picket-firing has been kept up along my front. Five deserters from the Fifth New Hampshire Regiment, First Brigade, First Division, Second Corps, came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1; total, 2 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 8, 1864

COLONEL: I have nothing of interest to report this morning. The picket and mortar fire has not been as heavy as usual. No change in position or force of the enemy since last report has been observed. There are no casualties to report this morning.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant-Colonel PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 9, 1864.

COLONEL: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. Everything has been very quiet along my front during the past twenty-four hours and no change in the enemy’s force or position has been observed.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 10, 1864.

COLONEL: Nothing worthy of reporting has occurred along my line during the past twenty-four hours. The troops were aroused and on the alert at 3 a. m. as directed. Eleven deserters from the First Division, Second Corps, came in last night.

The following is a list of casualties: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 11, 1864.

COLONEL: Harris’ brigade relieved 350 men on Wise’s last night. Sixteen deserters from the Fifth New Hampshire Regiment came into our lines this morning. They were unable to give any information in regard to the movement of the troops, &c.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 7. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1. Total, 1 killed, 9 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 12, 1864.

COLONEL: Nothing unusual has occurred along my front during the past twenty-four hours. The enemy opened a very brisk fire from their mortars about 7 o’clock last evening. Two deserters said that it was a salute, either in honor of a victory near Chaffin’s farm, or on account of the favorable result of a test vote which had been held in the army for the Presidential candidates. About 8 o’clock a sharp artillery and musketry fire sprang up in front of the two brigades on my right.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 5; total, 7 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, October 13, 1864.

COLONEL: The commanding officer of Wise’s brigade reports that his vedettes think the enemy were moving to our left yesterday, but deserters that came in last night knew nothing of it. Seven deserters from the Fifth New Hampshire Regiment came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2; Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 14, 1864.

COLONEL: An unusual quiet prevailed along my line yesterday. No movement on the part of the enemy was observed. Ten deserters came in last night; they had nothing of importance to report.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 15, 1864.

COLONEL: The enemy were very quiet along my front yesterday. Ho change has been observed during the last twenty-four hours. One deserter from the Fifth New Hampshire Regiment, Second Corps, came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel WH. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
October 16, 1864.

COLONEL: Yesterday was very quiet. Only an occasional shot was fired during the day. No movement of the enemy’s troops was observed.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 17, 1864.

COLONEL: Five deserters came in last night. They could give no information in regard to the movement of their troops, &c.

No casualties have occurred during the last twenty-four hours.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S. – Holcombe Legion arrived on the evening of the 16th of October, and relieved Wise’s brigade on the morning of the 17th of October, 1864.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 18, 1864.

COLONEL: Nothing worthy of report has occurred during the past twenty-four hours. Three deserters came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliot’s brigade, wounded, 8.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 19, 1864.

COLONEL: With the exception of mortar shelling last night, the enemy have been very quiet along my line during the last twenty-four hours. The casualties in Wise’s brigade (annexed) occurred while the command was at work on a battery, and were inflicted by mortar shells. One deserter came in last night, and I regret to report that two men deserted from Gracie’s brigade to the enemy. General Gracie says, however, that they were hospital rats, and but little injury is done to the country by their desertion.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 6; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 3.

Respectfully,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 20, 1864.

COLONEL: Four deserters came in last night. The substance of the information brought by them has already been forwarded.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. PALMER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 21, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: The enemy did not shell Battery Harris, upon which fatigue parties have been at work for the last four or five days, as much as usual last night. The Yankees cheered last night along Gracie’s front, and, when being asked the reason, said it was for Sheridan. Deserters report that the Sixth Corps and probably the Nineteenth were encamped in rear of the Second Corps three or four days since, but moved a day or two ago, either to the right or left.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 3.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 22, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: The enemy have been very quiet along our front during the past twenty-four hour. They did not fire upon our working parties last night. General Ransom reports that the enemy have thrown down most of their front line opposite his center, having left only posts for vedettes and sharpshooters. They seem to occupy their second line, which is now strongly stockaded. On his right and left they still appear to hold parts of the old line.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2. Elliott’s brigade, killed 2. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; killed, 1. Total, 3 killed, 3 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 23, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Nothing of importance has occurred on our line during the past twenty-four hours. The enemy did not shell our working party last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; total, 2 killed.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 24, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Nothing worthy of reporting has transpired along the line of this division during the past twenty-four hours. There were on last night five deserters from Ransom’s brigade. They were all men who has been brought in under the proclamation.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Total, 2 killed, 1 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 25, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Nothing of importance has transpired during the past twenty-four hours. The enemy have been very quiet. General Gracie reports that the enemy have leveled their line of works in front of their three-gun battery, and are destroying their abatis; probably the men are using the latter for fuel.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant WILLIAM MCWILLE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 26, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: General Gracie reports that the movement of wagons in the enemy’s lines was more perceptible than usual last night. General Ransom reports that strange noises were heard in our mine last evening, but regards the circumstances as trivial. The enemy kept up quite a brisk artillery fire yesterday. Their fire was drawn by one of our batteries opening on a working party.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 27, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: The men of this command were aroused at 4 a. m. this morning, expecting some demonstration from the enemy. They were, however, disappointed, as everything remained remarkably quiet.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Total, 1 killed and 2 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 28, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: About 10 a. m. on yesterday morning I moved Wallace’s brigade to the right and relieved Sanders’ and Harris’ brigades in the trenches. Wise’s brigade was moved from reserve into the position on the front line vacated by Wallace’s brigade. My right now rests at Battery Numbers 30. About dark last evening a force from the One hundred and forty-eighth Pennsylvania Regiment, Fourth [First] Division, Second Corps, perhaps 100 strong, advanced without support upon the battery on our front line to the right of the Baxter road, known as Davidson’s battery. It was the usual hour for posting and relieving pickets, and the division officer of the day, who happened to be passing at that point, mistook the force for pickets returning to the line, and gave orders to sentinels no to fire. By others this force was regarded as deserters coming to our lines. This impression was communicated by the orders on the infantry line to the gun in rear of the Creter which bore on the ground over which the force advanced. A light fire was, however, opened by our infantry to the right and left of Davidson’s battery. With axes the little force opened a passage through our chevaux-de-frise and entered Davidson’s battery and mingled with our men. Their hostile character having been ascertained, troops of Wise’s brigade charged them and drove them out, capturing 1 lieutenant and 14 men, who report that a number of their men were wounded and killed in the advance; among the latter a lieutenant of the One hundred and fourteenth Pennsylvania Regiment.* About 10 p. m. the enemy advanced upon and drove our men from a portion of the picket-line on the right of Rives’ house, occupied by troops of Wallace’s brigade. General Wallace promptly threw out a force and reoccupied the line. During these events the mortar and cannon firing was very heavy, especially from Colquitt’s salient to my right. Later in the night there was considerable artillery firing on my right. During the latter part of the night Brigadier-General Ransom, whose brigade is on my left and extends to the river, reported that the enemy’s troops were seen to be moving to our left. It was thought they might be massing in his front.

The following casualties are reported for the twenty-four hours ending at 8 a. m. to-day: Wise’s brigade, missing, 4 officers and 10 enlisted men; killed, 2 enlisted men; wounded, 13 enlisted men. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 13; captured, 6; missing, 2. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 3.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

—————

* Reference is probably to Lieutenant Henry D. Price, One hundred and sixteenth Pennsylvania Infantry; see Miles’ report, p. 255.

—————

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
October 29, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Yesterday was unusually quiet. No changes were noticed along our front. The troops were aroused at 4 a. m., and placed on the alert, but nothing occurred to test their vigilance.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, missing, 2; Wise’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 30, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: No change or movement of troops has been observed during past twenty-four hours; everything has been remarkably quiet along our front. Two deserters from the Second Corps came in last night; one reported that the enemy thought our line very weak, owing to the fact that they found no men in the fort which they took on the evening of the 27th. He also reported that their front line was very weak; did not think any other troops besides the Second Corps were in our front. The enemy are throwing up a work for a battery to bear upon Fort Harris, one of our batteries.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 2; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2; total, 6 wounded.

Three regiments of Wallace’s brigade relieved by Mahone and brought in reserve.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., October 31, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Quite a brisk musketry fire sprang up about 10 o’clock last night to the right of this division, and gradually extended to the left. The firing was exclusively from the picket-lines. General Gracie reports that trains stopped in front of his lines last night, and the enemy’s camp-fires became brighter than usual, which would seem to indicate that fresh troops had arrived. Two deserters came in last night; they belong to the Second Corps, and said that corps was the only one in our front. They also state that their officers regarded the engagement on our right a few days since as very disastrous to them.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1, wounded, 1. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1. Total, 3 killed, 2 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., November 1, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: A deserter who came in on Ransom’s line reports the Fifth Army Corps on the City Point Railroad last night, about a mile in rear of the enemy’s line in front of my left. Whether it is there to remain or to move farther last night he does not know. Previous to the last movement on our right troops were assembled at some point and moved to the point of attack. Among their soldiers there is some rumor of a purpose to break our line and enter Petersburg. The point at which this was spoken of was about four miles from the Appomattox toward the enemy’s left. The forces on the enemy’s front line have, some of them, been relieved by troops of the same army corps – the Second. The deserter was of the Second Corps and was in the fight at Burgess’ Mill. He says they suffered heavily; that our troops would have completely whipped them had they pressed on. They withdrew because they were so roughly handled, and because they felt that they could not hold their position.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2 (1 mortally). Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., November 2, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: General Gracie reports that the enemy’s trains were running the greater portion of last night. Three deserters from the Second Corps came in last night. They think that the Fifth Corps is still on the extreme left of our lines and not on the railroad in front of this division as reported yesterday morning.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; tota, 1 killed and 2 wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 3, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing new to report this morning. General R. E. Lee inspected the line occupied by this division on yesterday. Three men deserted from Wise’s brigade last night. A deserter from the Second Corps came into our lines this morning.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant WILLIAM MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., November 4, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing new to report this morning. Three deserters from the Second Army Corps came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant WILLIAM MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., November 5, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Brigade commanders report that everything has been very quiet along the front during the past twenty-four hours.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant WILLIAM MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., November 6, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: With a view to force the enemy’s picket-line farther back at points very near our line, two movements were made in this division with small detachments last night. At 11.40 p. m. Brigadier-General Gracie moved out three companies of the Forty-first Alabama Regiment and took the enemy’s picket-line in front of Gracie’s salient, capturing 31 prisoners without firing a gun or suffering the loss of a man. Our picket-line in front of the salient is now established on the enemy’s old line, with the left resting on Gracie’s dam and the right connected with our picket-line on the right of the Norfolk railroad. The enemy seem not to have been aware of the movement until some time after it was consummated, and they now appear to acquiesce in the change in our lines, having made no effort to drive back our troops. At the same time 200 men of Holcombe Legion carried the enemy’s picket-line in front of the Crater, capturing the adjutant and nine men of the Eleventh Massachusetts Regiment. The enemy were on the alert here, and fled after delivering a single volley. They, however, continued to fight for the position, and fired on our forces in possession of their works from all points, but mainly from the (our) right of that position. They continually pressed their forces up the ditch and kept up a fire from the ridge on the (our) right. From this ridge they enfiladed our line, and for five hours small additions were being constantly made to our losses. A working party was placed at work to make a covering for our troops on the new line, with a view to holding it permanently. Through the incessant fire this party made such little progress in the work that at 5 o’clock this morning our losses continued to be such as to induce the withdrawal of our troops to our old line.

The casualties, a list of which is herewith forwarded, are:

This morning Colquitt’s salient was shelled for some time by mortars. In front of Wise’s brigade at 12 o’clock there was a spirited fire with small-arms, after which the artillery fire continued for about an hour. The adjutant captured reports that their lines were re-enforced last evening about 5 o’clock, and that it was stated that a movement on our part was anticipated. It is pretty well ascertained that the enemy’s rear line, upon which they evidently mainly propose to depend, consists of a system of detached forts completely inclosed with ditch and draw-bridge. Near these the troops not on picket duty are kept. It seems to me this system possesses advantages over that of our line. To some extent this system is in progress so far as the fortifications are concerned on my line. I shall for some time need a working force in rear for the work on my rear line.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant WILLIAM MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Anderson’s Corps.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 7, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing new to report this morning. The picket-fire has been more rapid than usual during past twenty-four hours, owing to the fact, perhaps, that they were expecting their picket-line to be again attacked. Inclosed I forward the report* of Lieutenant-Colonel Trimmier, Forty-first Alabama Regiment, Gracie’s brigade, in regard to the capture of the enemy’s picket-line on the night of the 5th November.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 4.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 8, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Nothing new has been observed along my front during the past twenty-four hours. Quite a brisk picket-fire sprang up about 8.30 o’clock last night. It commenced to the right of Wise’s bri-

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* Not found.

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gade and extended along the front of the two right regiments of that brigade. It was due probably to the nervous condition of the enemy and the dense fog. The truce sent out this morning has expired; all our dead (13 in number) were brought within our lines. The enemy reported the capture of 41 prisoners, which is the number reported by Brigadier-General Wallace.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 4.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 9, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing new to report this morning. Details are kept at work on Battery Harris, and it will soon be completed.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Grecie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 4 (1 mortally).

Respectfully your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 10, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: The firing along the line last night was principally to the right of this division and was confined entirely to the pickets on my front. No particular reason has been assigned for the firing. The division was extended last evening as ordered.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 4. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 5. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Total, killed, 2; wounded, 15.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 11, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing unusual to report this morning. Quite a brisk picket-fire sprang up last night about 8 o’clock, but was to the right of this division. Three deserters from the Seventh New Jersey

Regiment, Third Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, came in this morning. They report that the enemy considers the campaign over. They do not expect any more fighting this winter. They also state that Butler’s canal at Dutch Gap was regarded as a failure. They explain the recent heavy picket-firing at night to be due to the fact that new and nervous men are placed on duty.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 13, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing of interest to report this morning. Six deserters from the Seventh New Jersey Regiment came over this morning in front of Wise’s brigade.

The following casualties are respectively submitted: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 14, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Brigade commanders report all quiet along their respective fronts during past twenty-four hours. Two deserters from the Seventh New Jersey Regiment, and six from the Eighth New Jersey Regiment came into our lines in front of Wise’s brigade last night.

The following casualties are respectively submitted: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 2; Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 15, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have nothing of interest to report this morning. Five deserters from the Seventh New Jersey Regiment came over last night. There was rapid firing on General Wallace’s line last night, but was confined exclusively to the pickets.

The following casualties are respectively submitted: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 4.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 16, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Everything has been quiet along the line during the past twenty-four hours. Seven deserters from the Eighth New Jersey Regiment came in last night. They were foreigners and could give but little information.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
Petersburg, Va., November 17, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Nothing unusual to report this morning. Brigadier-General Ransom reports that there was a considerable movement of trains on the railroad in the enemy’s rear last night, the cause of which is not known.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 18, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Nothing unusual to report this morning. A deserter from the Seventh New Jersey Regiment came in this morning. He reports that a portion of Sheridan’s army (does not know what number) arrived at City Point on the night of the 16th instant. He did not know to what portion of Grant’s army they had been sent. A report* of General Gracie’s is inclosed for your information.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 4 (1 mortally); Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 19, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: All quiet in my front this morning. In accordance with suggestion of General Lee the picket-line on the right and left of the Baxter road was advanced from fifty to seventy-five yards. This

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* Not found.

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was done last night, no casualties occurring in its execution. The new pits are now perfectly secure, and the picket-line runs nearly parallel with the main line.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 20, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: All quiet along my front during past twenty-four hours. The following casualties are respectfully reported: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Lieutenant MCWILLIE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 21, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Seven deserters from the Seventh New Jersey Regiment and two from the Eighth New York [Heavy Artillery] Regiment came into our line this morning. James Stewart (one of the deserters), of the Eighth New York Regiment, Second Brigade, Second Division, Second Corps, stated that the enemy were mining in front of Colquitt’s salient; that they used a car which ran upon tracks to bring the earth out. He stated that the car could be heard running down grade some time after it started from the entrance to the mine. I would respectfully request that an officer acquainted with mining operations be sent to Colquitt’s salient to investigate the matter and determine what countermining is necessary upon our part. I would also request that he confer with me upon the subject. Stewart also reported that the Second Division of the Second Corps rested upon the Appomattox and extended to the left until it united with the Third Division, Second Corps. The Ninth Corps is on the left of the Third Division of the Second Corps, and the First Division of the Second Corps is in reserve to the Second Division of the same corps in front of Colquitt’s salient, where the enemy are mining. The disposition of the enemy’s forces shows a large reserve force where we have none. As the repairing of the roads are under charge of Colonel Talcott, I would respectfully suggest that he be directed to examine the road across Lieutenant Creek, at the end of Sycamore street, as it is impossible to haul wood on that road, and I think it will be necessary to construct a new one.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 22, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Nothing of interest to report this morning. Seven deserters came in last night; they give no information of importance. I would suggest that our mortars be directed to fire in the direction of the enemy’s forts, as deserters report that they have large reserves in the forts, and are frequently wounded by stray shots from our side.

No casualties this morning.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 23, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Four deserters came in this morning. They give no information of interest.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Wise’s brigade, killed, 2; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 24, 1864.

CAPTAIN: The usual quiet has prevailed along my line during past twenty-four hours. Four men deserted from the picket-line of Wise’s brigade last night and two from Ransom’s. Five deserters from the Seventh New Jersey Regiment came in this morning.

The following casualties are reported: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1 (mortally). Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1 (mortally).

Wise’s brigade was yesterday extended 100 yards to the right to relieve in part Wallace’s brigade from heavy picket duty.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 25, 1864.

CAPTAIN: The picket-firing in front of the right of Wallace’s brigade was quite rapid about 8.30 o’clock last night, but was confined almost exclusively to the enemy’s side. Three men deserted from the picket-posts in front of Wise’s brigade last night. Four deserters from the enemy came in this morning.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 26, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have nothing except a few casualties to report this morning, viz: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S. – One deserter from the Eighth New Jersey Regiment came over last night.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 27, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have again to report all quiet along my front during the past twenty-four hours, save the usual sharpshooting. Nine deserters came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 4. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2. Total, 2 killed, 8 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 28, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Three men deserted from Gracie’s brigade last night; one from Ransom’s and one from Wise’s. Two deserters from the Eighth New Jersey Regiment came into our lines this morning. Nothing of interest has been observed during past twenty-four hours.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 29, 1864.

CAPTAIN: The officer of the day of Wise’s brigade reports that the enemy’s train passed from our left to right four times last night. Fifteen deserters from the Seventh and Eighth New Jersey and Ninety-fourth New York Regiments came in last night.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 3. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 30, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Deserters report the movement of troops observed yesterday evening to have been the Ninth Corps, relieving the Second Corps. They also said that the Second Corps had gone to Patrick’s Station, about nine miles to our right. Five deserters came over this morning. General Grant visited the lines near the Appomattox yesterday.

The following casualties are reported: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 4. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
November 30, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Deserters report the movement of troops observed yesterday evening to have been the Ninth Corps, relieving the Second Corps. They also said that the Second Corps had gone to Patrick’s Station, about nine miles to our right. Five deserters came over this morning. General Grant visited the lines near the Appomattox yesterday.

The following casualties are reported: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 4. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Captain S. D. SHANNON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 1, 1864.

MAJOR: Colonel Goode, commanding Wise’s brigade, thinks that the movement of troops observed yesterday evening was nothing more than a relief of pickets. His officer of the day reports that Indians are on duty in front of that brigade; they belong to the Ninth Corps. Several communications on the subject of ordnance have been received, and an investigation is now being made to endeavor to decrease the expenditure. A report will be made as soon as the matter is reported upon by brigade commanders.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 2, 1864.

MAJOR: After a careful examination in regard to the expenditure of ammunition by this command, I have the honor to report the following facts in relation thereto: First, there are in this division 1,100 men constantly on duty, charged specially with firing upon the enemy. Second, there are about 20,000 rounds of ammunition expended in each twenty-four hours, being about eighteen rounds for each men on picket duty. I would further state that the enemy’s deserters report that they are furnished with 100 rounds of ammunition when they are placed on picket, and are ordered to expend it during their term of duty. Thus it will be seen that the enemy fire at least five shots to our one. i have given directions to diminish our sharpshooting as much as can be done with prudence. Nothing of importance to report.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 2; wounded, 5. Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded 2. Total, 4 killed, 9 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 3, 1864.

MAJOR: The enemy are rather increasing their picket-fire and number of pickets. They frequently show themselves in rear, owing to the fact that our men ordered to be very careful of ammunition.

The following casualties are reported: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1 (mortally). Gracie’s brigade, killed, 2; wounded, 2. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 4.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 4, 1864.

MAJOR: Two deserters came over in front of this division last night. Joseph Green, of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Regiment, states: First, that their pickets have general orders not to communicate with our men in any manner; second, the pickets are ordered to fire all the time and that cartridges are being constantly supplied to men on picket; third, that four men were wounded and one killed in his regiment before he left yesterday; fourth, that when Butler’s canal is done, a general attack will be made.

John Schumacher states: First, that the negroes of the Ninth Corps have all been sent away to Butler to work on the canal; second, that the Second and part of the Eighteenth Corps hold all the line south of the Appomattox; third, that the Second, Fifth, and part of the Eighteenth

Corps moved toward City Point, and are somewhere this side of City Point; fourth, that he heard his division commander, General Griffin, say that nothing more could be done on our right; fifth, that one more effort will be made to take our lines, and failing in this, a new line of operations will be adopted; sixth, that the attack would be made on the side of the Crater, and that the Second, Fifth, and part of the Eighteenth Corps were, perhaps, ready for the work.

The following casualties are reported: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 2; wounded, 2. Gradie’s brigade, wounded, 2. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 5, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of interest to report this morning. Owing to the imperfect English spoken by deserter, John Schumacher, I find I was mistaken in his report on yesterday in regard to the disposition of the Yankee forces. Through an interpreter, Brigadier-General Wallace obtained information which shows that the deserter meant to say to me that a part of the Eighteenth Corps was ordered to replace the negroes of the Ninth Corps sent to Butler, and that perhaps that part of the former corps was in rear with the Second and Fifth Corps, and that the Ninth Corps extends from Appomattox to one mile and a half to right of Yellow Tavern, and is there connected with cavalry. I have the honor to forward the name of Captain J. W. Smith, Company I, Twenty-sixth Virginia Regiment, as an officer eminently qualified to fill the position of judge-advocate to a general court martial.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 6, 1864.

MAJOR: I have to report all quiet along the front of this division during the past twenty-four hours. Two men from Gracie’s brigade and one from Wise’s deserted last night.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1 (mortally).

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 7, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing, except casualties, to report this morning. The usual quiet has prevailed along my line during the past twenty-four hours. Colonel Stansel, commanding Gracie’s brigade, reports that the work on the new line to the right of the Crater is progressing well.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade wounded, 2; Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 8, 1864.

MAJOR: Brigade commanders were instructed to be particularly vigilant and observant during last night and this morning. Nothing of interest has been reported, however, save the passage of trains from our left to right yesterday from 1 p. m. to 11 p. m.

The following casualties are reported: Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 6. Gracie’s brigade, wounded,1. Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 9, 1864.

MAJOR: The extension of this division was made as ordered yesterday evening. Two deserters who came in this morning report that the Ninth Corps is in my front, and the left of the Ninth rests on the right of the Second Corps.

The following casualties are reported: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 10, 1864.

MAJOR: Nothing of interest has transpired along my line during past twenty-four hours. Two deserters are reported from Wise’s brigade and two from Ransom’s.

The following casualties are reported: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2; Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 11, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of special interest to report this morning. Four men deserted from Gracie’s brigade last night.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1 (mortally); Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 12, 1864.

MAJOR: I have to report all quiet along my front during past twenty-four hours. Nothing worthy of reporting has been observed.

The following casualties are reported: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 2; Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1 (mortally); Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 13, 1864.

MAJOR: The usual quiet has prevailed along my lines during the past twenty-four hours. Colonel Stansel, commanding Gracie’s brigade, reports that his negro teamsters ran off last night.

The following casualties are reported: Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Total, 2 killed, 3 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 14, 1864.

MAJOR: A deserter came in last night. The only matter worthy of reporting that he could give information in regard to was that the Third Brigade of the Ninth Corps had not returned to its position in reserve. This division was moved, as ordered, yesterday evening. Scales’ brigade relieved a portion of this command. The right of the division now rests at Lieutenant Run or Battery Numbers 35.

The following casualties are reported: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 1; Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 15, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of especial interest to report this morning.

The following casualties are reported during past twenty-four hours: Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 3; wounded, 7. Gracie’s brigade, killed, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 16, 1864.

MAJOR: Nothing unusual to report this morning.

The following list of casualties is respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1. Elliott’s brigade, killed, 1. Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 2.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 17, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report during the past twenty-four hours. Quite a brisk fire sprang up along the line about 4 o’clock yesterday evening. It was brought on by one of our batteries firing upon a drilling party of the enemy. During this fire Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley, commanding artillery battalion, was killed.

The following casualties are reported: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 2 (one mortally). Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; killed, 1. Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 2. Total, 1 killed, 5 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 18, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of interest to report during past twenty-four house. A number of blank cartridges were fired by the enemy about 7 o’clock this morning, supposed to have been a salute.

The following casualties are reported: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Gracie’s brigade, wounded 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 19, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. The usual quiet has prevailed during past twenty-four hours.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Majr. R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 20, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. Four men of the Thirty-fourth Virginia Regiment, Wise’s brigade, deserted to the enemy last night.

The following casualties are respectfully reported: Ransom’s brigade, wounded, 6. Wise’s brigade, wounded, 1; killed, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 21, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. No casualties have occurred during past twenty-four hours except one wounded, from Gracie’s brigade.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 22, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report during past twenty-four hours. Colonel Goode, commanding Wise’s brigade, reports that six men deserted from the Forty-sixth Virginia Regiment to the enemy last night.

The following casualties have occurred during past twenty-four hours: Ransom’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 23, 1864.

MAJOR: Nothing of importance to report this morning. Six men from the Forty-sixth Virginia and tow from the Thirty-fourth Virginia Regiment deserted to the enemy last night; also two deserted from Gracie’s brigade.

No casualties to report during past twenty-four hours.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 25, 1864.

MAJOR: Everything has been remarkably quiet in front of this division for the past twenty-four hours. Four men deserted from Wise’s brigade on last night.

Only one casualty to report, viz, Gracie’s brigade, one wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 26, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of importance to report this morning. Seven men deserted to the enemy from Ransom’s brigade last night; also four from Wise’s and two from Gracie’s. One of the deserters from Gracie’s brigade was Lieutenant R. G. Redwood, Company K, Forty-third Alabama Regiment. The enemy fired a salute about 6.30 o’clock this morning.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie’s brigade, wounded, 1; Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 27, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of interest to report during the past twenty-four hours. Two men deserted to the enemy from Wise’s brigade last night and one from Gracie’s.

The following casualties are reported: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 30, 1864.

MAJOR: I have nothing of interest to report this morning. One man deserted last night from Elliott’s brigade.

The following casualties are reported: Elliott’s brigade, wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON’S DIVISION,
December 31, 1864.

MAJOR: Matters have been quiet along the front of this division during the past twenty-four hours. Six men deserted from Wise’s brigade last night and two from Gracie’s. I would call your attention to the fact that there are a number of barefooted men in this command. The inspector-general of the army inspected Ransom’s brigade some ten days or tow weeks since, took down the number of barefooted men, and promised the shoes, but they have not been furnished.

The following casualties occurred since yesterday morning: Wise’s brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,
Major-General.

Major DUNCAN,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 883-925

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