Number 167. Petersburg Campaign Report of Captain Henry H. Fish, Ninety-fourth New York Infantry, of operations August 18-September 2

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

No. 167. Report of Captain Henry H. Fish, Ninety-fourth New York Infantry, of operations August 18-September 2.1

HDQRS. NINETY-FOURTH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
Camp in the Field, Va., September 2, 1864.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with circular dated headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division, Fifth Army Corps, September 2, 1864, I have the honor to submit the following statement:

The regiment left a situation on the Jerusalem plank road early on the morning of the 18th of August, 1864, and reached the Weldon railroad at a point three miles south of Petersburg about noon. The brigade halting and massing, we formed a line in rear of the Ninety-seventh Regiment New York Volunteers. We remained there about an hour, when we were ordered forward, We advanced into a piece of woods where we halted, having found the enemy. The right wing was then sent to support Colonel Hartshorne’s brigade, which was deployed as skirmishers. The left wing advanced with the brigade and during the night threw up rifle-pits. 19th, the right wing returned about noon. During the afternoon we moved to the right and threw up works. About 4 o’clock they drove in the skirmishers on our right and came in our rear, killing 1 man, wounding 8, and capturing 131. The regiment was compelled to jump over the works and fall back with the brigade. After resting about an hour we advanced and occupied our former position. we remained there during the night, firing at intervals by order of Colonel Wheelock, commanding brigade. 20th, at 9 a. m. a part of the Ninth Army Corps relieved our pickets; marched out and formed a line near the brick house, threw up rifle-pits, and remained during the night. 21st, at 9 a. m. the enemy opened with artillery, compelling us to seek shelter on the outer side of our works. In the afternoon we marched to support the First Division, Fifth Army Corps, and formed line on the railroad, where we remained until sundown; marched thence to the right and occupied some rifle-pits; spent most of the night building traverses. 22nd, occupied the same position. 23rd, at 10 a. m. moved down the track, destroying it. burning the ties and rails; rested in a field until 5 p. m., when we moved out and formed a line on the edge of a woods near the picketline, supporting a working party; at 7 we moved back and encamped for the night near the brick house. 24th, at 4 p. m. moved into camp near headquarters Third Division, Fifth Army Corps. 25th, were under arms at 3 a. m. made a detour toward Petersburg and returned ; at 2 moved to the brisk hose and from thence down the road toward Reams’ Station about a mile, where we formed a line, and, threw up works. 26th, completed works, and made an abatis. 27th, occupied the same position. 28th, no change. 29th, no change. 30th, the regiment, under the charge of Major McMahon, worked on a fort. 31st, at 10 a. m. the regiment was mustered and inspected by Major McMahon.  During the afternoon we moved back into our camp on the hill near division headquarters.

September 1, remained in camp. 2nd, were under arms at 2 p. m.; moved toward Reams’ Station. After passing the main fortifications halted and rested an hour in a field; moved back toward Petersburg and massed in a field, supporting cavalry; at 10 marched back to camp.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY H. FIRSH,

Captain, Commanding Ninety-fourth New York Volunteers.

Captain ISAAC DOOLITTLE, A. A. A. G., 2nd Brigadier, 3rd Div., 5th A. C.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 515

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