Number 93. Report of Captain Charles E. Patton, One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 15-17

   

0 comments

in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

Numbers 93. Report of Captain Charles E. Patton, One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 15-17.1

HDQRS. 105TH Regiment PENNSYLVANIA VETERAN VOLS., In Field, near Deep Bottom Landing, August 18, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with orders of this date from headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, I have the honor to report that on the 15th instant the regiment was formed on the extreme left of the brigade in front line of battle, which position it held during that day in driving the enemy to their works and taking possession of the Charles City road. We were withdrawn at dark, brought back and formed in column with brigade in field to the right and near the Tenth Corps headquarters, where we remained a short time, when an

order was received to move forward and occupy the works on the front line, where we remained until the morning of the 16th. Our loss during that day (15th) was six enlisted men wounded. On the morning of the 16th the regiment moved with the brigade and formed on right of the Tenth Corps to protect the flank, the left resting on First Maryland (dismounted) Cavalry, and advanced with that line in driving the enemy to their line of works. When their position was charged on we were formed in front of works at right angles, the left of the regiment resting on the rifle-pits. We advanced and charged down the line on the enemy’s left flank, capturing about 75 prisoners, including 2 commissioned officers, who were sent to rear. At this time, the right of the brigade having fallen back, our right and left were entirely unprotected, and, being exposed to an enfilading fire on both flanks, we were forced to fall back. We then moved with One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers and formed line in woods parallel with rifle-pits, where we remained a short time, when we were ordered to join the brigade a short distance in rear. We were then moved and formed on right of Tenth Corps in front line, where we remained until near daylight next morning, when we moved back in rear of rifle-pits. Our loss on that day was I commissioned officer killed (Colonel Craig, commanding brigade), 1 commissioned officer wounded, 2 enlisted men killed, 16 wounded, and 6 missing, making a total loss of 26 on that day.

Our loss during the entire operations was 1 commissioned officer killed and 1 wounded, 2 enlisted men killed, 22 wounded, and 6 missing, making a total of 32.

The regiment behaved gallantly; no instance of cowardice occurred amongst officers or men.

On the morning of the 17th we moved with the brigade and joined the division in rear.

Respectfully submitted.

C. E. PATTON,

Captain, Commanding Regiment.

Captain F. E. MARBLE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 380-381

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: