Number 6. Itinerary of the Army of the Potomac and Army of the James

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

No. 6. Itinerary of the Army of the Potomac and Army of the James.*1

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

Volunteer Engineer Brigade.

August 1 to 9.-Troops at work on the defenses and policing the river-bank.

August 10.-Bridge a Broadway Landing, on the Appomattox, taken up and brought down to City Point.

August 13.-Eight boats, with material, sent to Captain Lubey, at Jones’ Neck. Raft of thirty-six boats with Captain Henderson to Deep Bottom.

August 20.-Eight boats, with material, sent to Captain Lubey, at Jones’ Neck. Raft of thirty-six boats, under Captain Slosson, sent to Broadway Landing, and bridge laid.

August 21.-Captain Henderson, with his bridge of thirty-six boats, returned from Deep Bottom.

August 22.-Captain Slosson returned to City Point from Broadway Landing with his bridge of thirty-six boats. During the remainder of the month several experiments were made which showed the practicability of towing pontoon bridges ready laid even against strong tides.

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* From returns of the commands indicated for August to December, 1864.

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September 19.-Two brigades of infantry from the Eighteenth Corps reported to General Benham, and were stationed near Old Court-House.

September 27.-The two brigades of infantry belonging to the Eighteenth Corps broke camp and marched to join General Butler’s command, leaving two regiments of Pennsylvania volunteer infantry at Old Court-House.

December 1 to 10.-Details at work at quartermaster’s department, hospital department, and cattle herd.

December 1.-The whole command ordered to the lines in front of Petersburg, to report to Major-General parke, commanding Ninth Corps; troops bivouacked near Avery’s house and at Meade’s Station.

December 11.-Whole command moved to near Avery’s house.

December 12.-Ordered to return to City Point.

December 13 to 16.-Details sent to the hospital, &c., for fatigue.

December 16.-Ordered to sent 1,000 men to report to General Ferrero, Bermuda Hundred Defenses. Lieutenant-Colonel Clough sent.

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SECOND ARMY CORPS.*

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August 1.-In camp before Petersburg, Va.; corps headquarters at Deserted House.

August 12.-Broke camp at 3 p. m. and moved to City Point, Va.

August 13.-Embarked on transports and sailed for Deep Bottom, Va.

August 14.-Disembarked at Deep Bottom at 9 a. m.; Third Division sent forward, with one brigade thrown out as skirmishers; slight skirmishing, the enemy falling back to their intrenched line.

August 15.-Slight skirmishing all day.

August 16.-Held position of day previous, the First Division having advanced their line by carrying position of the enemy’s works.

August 17.- Held same position.

August 18.-Third Division ordered to relieve a division of the Ninth corps in works in front of Petersburg.

August 20.-Held same position; commenced recrossing the James River at 7.30 p. m., and reached camp near Deserted House at 6.30 a. m. [21st.]

August 21.-At 1 p. m. First and Second Divisions of corps moved toward Weldon railroad; encamped near Aiken’s house.

August 22.-First Division sent to destroy railroad and support the cavalry.

August 23 and 24.-Destroying railroad.

August 25.-The Second Division ordered to make a reconnaissance and to destroy railroad; skirmishing during the morning and heavy attack during afternoon’ withdrew at dark, the First and Second Divisions taking position near Williams’ house.

August 26.-Held same position.

August 27.-Moved two divisions near Jones’ house, where they remained, supporting different parts of the line and furnish in fatigue details for the completion of the different works.

September 1.-The Third Division was holding intrenched line from the Strong house to Norfolk railroad. The First and Second Divisions in reserve, engaged in completing defensive works, especially the rear line, from Norfolk railroad to Jerusalem plank road.

September 24.-At night the First and Second Divisions relieved the Tenth Corps from line of works.

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* Commanded by Major General Winfield S. Hancock to November 26, 1864, then by Major General Andrew A. Humphreys.

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October 1.-The Third Division was relieved from the front line and moved to the extreme left, under orders to report to Major-General Parke, to operate with his command in a reconnaissance near the South Side Railroad.

October 5.-The division returned and resumed position in the front line. The First Division occupied the line in front of Petersburg from Fort Spring Hill to Fort Meikel from the 1st to the 5th, when it was relieved by the Second Division. The First Division then held the line from Fort Morton to the river, with reserves in rear of Forts Haskell and Sullivan.

October 24.-At night the entire line was broken up as far as Battery 24 by the First Division.

October 26.-At 2 p. m. the Second and Third Divisions, with twelve pieces of artillery, moved forward, and at night were massed near Fort Dushane.

October 27.-They were marched toward the South Side Railroad, and were heavily engaged during the day with the enemy’s forces near the Boydton road, retaining their position until after midnight, even the troops retired under orders from the commanding general Army of the Potomac.

October 28.-The troops returned. During the next three days the Second and Third Divisions resumed positions on the front line, relieving the First Division, which was then massed near the Southall house. During the absence of the Second and Third Divisions on the 26th, 27th, and 28th a small command of the First Division attacked the enemy’s works near the Crater, and for a time succeeded in occupying the same, capturing several prisoners, including two field officers, but finally had to retire with small loss.

[November.]-The Second and Third Divisions garrisoning forts, batteries, and intrenched works before Petersburg until November 29, with the First Division in position of support line of works.

November 30.-The divisions of the corps were relieved in their respective positions by the Ninth Army Corps and marched to the extreme left, taking the position formerly occupied by the Ninth Army Corps, with corps headquarters at the Pebbles house.

December 6 [7].-The Third Division moved from camp in front of rear line of works by way of Jerusalem plank road to the Nottoway River. December 7 [8].-Moved to Chambliss’ farm.

December 8 [9].-Moved to Jarratt’s Station, Weldon railroad, and commenced destruction of the track.

December 9 [10].-Commenced return movement and arrived at present camp, in front of Fort Clarke and Fort Siebert, between Vaughan and Halifax roads, on the 11th [12th]. The above movement in conjunction with Fifth Army Corps. The First Division [December 9] marched at daylight on the Vaughan road toward Hatcher’s Run; there encountered enemy’s pickets and drove them across the run; forced crossing of the run and advanced to Armstrong’s Mill on reconnaissance.

December 10.-Returned to present camp. Four batteries of the corps are located on the line occupied by the Ninth Army Corps.

First Division.

August [12] 13.-Struck camp and marched to City Point; embarked and sailed up the James River to Deep Bottom.

August 14.-Landed at Deep Bottom and pushed out to the New Market road, skirmishing all day. At night took up position opposite enemy’s works and intrenched.

August 16.-First Brigade made reconnaissance to White’s Tavern, on the New Market road.

August 20.-Recrossed James and Appomattox Rivers, returning to position in front of Petersburg.

August 21.-Marched to Gurley’s house.

August 22.-Marched to the Weldon railroad and commenced its destruction.

August 23.-destroyed railroad to Reams’ Station.

August 25.-Fought the enemy at Reams’ Station and marched of Williams’ house.

August 27.-Took position in reserve near avery’s House, in front of Petersburg.

Re-enforcements: Fourth New York Heavy Artillery-57 commissioned officers and 1,557 enlisted men; one company of the Seventh New York Volunteers-3 commissioned officers and 91 enlisted men.

Reductions: Captain J. M. Faville, Fifty-seventh New York Volunteers, Company F, August 11; Captain Jones, Fifty-seventh New York Volunteers, Company I, August 13.

September 5.-Division moved from camp at Deserted House to Jerusalem plank road, where it built a line of works.

September 9.-Moved into camp near the Jones house.

September 24.-Moved into line of works from the Appomattox to Fort Meikel, headquarters at the Friend house.

October 1.-Division occupied line in front of Petersburg from Fort Spring Hill to Fort Meikel; headquarters at Friend’s house.

October 5.-Were relieved by Second Division from Fort Meikel to Fort morton, inclusive.

October 25.-Relieved by Second and Third Divisions, taking up the line as far to the left as Battery 24; moved headquarters to Avery’s house; occupied this line on October 31.

November 4.-Moved into position to support line of works Remained until November 30, when the division moved to line of works on left of Fifth Corps.

December 9.-Broke camp at daylight and marched on the vaughan road toward hatcher’s Run; encountered the enemy’s pickets, which were driven across the run; forced a crossing and advanced to Armstrong’s Mill; remained until 1 p. m. of the 10th, when the division returned to present camp. No other movements.

First Brigade, First Division.

August 12.-We remained in our old camp near Petersburg up to present date, when we broke camp and marched at 4 p. m. to within 2 miles of City Point and encamped over night.

August 13.-At 11.30 a. m. moved down to the landing and commenced to embark. At 3.20 p. m. the brigade was embarked, and at 10 p. m. we started for Deep Bottom.

August 14.-At 1. a. m. we arrived at Deep Bottom; disembarked and formed near the place in the open field where we encamped July 27. At 10 a. m. we moved forward and occupied the New Market road. At 1 p. m. we captured a rifle-pit and had sharp skirmishing all afternoon.

August 15.-We moved down the New Market road toward the right to support the cavalry.

August 16.-At 4 a. m. we were ordered to make a reconnaissance out on the Charles City road in conduction with Gregg’s cavalry. We met the enemy in force at White’s Tavern. At 3 p. m. we fell back and formed on the right of Birney’s troops (Tenth Corps).

August 18.-We fell back about one mile on the New Market road and remained until 7 p.m., when we moved out to support Gregg’s cavalry, which was hard pressed by the enemy. At 11 p. m. we moved back to our former position on the New Market road and threw up breast-works.

August 20.-At 8 p. m. we recrossed the James and Appomattox and marched to our old camp near Petersburg.

August 21.-At 11.30 a. m. the brigade marched to near the Weldon railroad and bivouacked.

August 22.-We commenced destroying the railroad toward Reams’ Station.

August 23.-Moved toward Reams’ Station at 10.30 a. m.

August 24.-We continued to destroy the railroad three miles beyond Reams’ Station, and bivouacked.

August 25.-About 2 p. m. the enemy made an attack on our breastworks and were repulsed. About 4 p. m. they attacked again and were repulsed likewise. The third attack of the enemy was made about 5 p. m., when they succeeded in forcing back the troops on our left, leaving our left flank exposed. For a time we were compelled to abandon our works. The brigade rallied, however, and recaptured the portion of the works occupied by it before the attack of the enemy. At 9 p. m. were ordered to fall back, which was done in good order, arriving near the Williams house at 10.30 p. m. bivouacked for the night.

August 26.-We threw up breast-works near the Williams house.

August 27.-At 9 p. m. we received orders to fall back to near our old position before Petersburg, where we remained in reserve for the rest of the month.

September 5.-About 6 p. m. we moved to the left to near Williams’ house and built breast-works in the rear and left of the Ninth Army Corps.

September 8.-Returned to near Hancock’s Station and encamped along the railroad.

September 16.-At 12 m. we moved out toward Reams’ Station to support the cavalry.

September 17.-Returned about 2 p. m.

September 20.-At 8 p. m. we moved again out to near the Williams house.

September 23.-Returned to our camp near Hancock’s Station.

September 25.-Moved to the right and relieved a portion of the Tenth Army Corps.

October 1.-The brigade moved to the left about one mile and a half, occupying the front line and inclosed works from Fort Meikel to the Appomattox, relieving that portion of the Second Division and aptly of the Third Division.

October 5.-We returned to our former position.

October 25.-We again moved to the left, occupying the front line and inclosed works from Fort Morton to the river.

October 31.-Was relieved by the Second Division and moved to near the Southall house.

November 1.-The brigade, in command of Colonel William Wilson, Eighty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, was relieved from the front line of works near Fort Stedman by the Second Division, Second Corps, and moved to the rear of line near Fort Bross; went into camp and commenced building quarters.

November 3.-Colonel William Wilson, Eighty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, was relieved from command of the brigade by Byt. Brigadier General George N. Macy.

November 4.-The brigade, with the division, was reviewed by Brigadier General Nelson A. Miles.

November 5.-The division was reviewed by Major-General Hancock. In the evening we received orders to be ready to move; struck tents and moved shortly after dare, and took position in the ravine in rear of Fort Stedman, arriving there about 12 o’clock at night, and remaining there until November 16, when the Twenty-sixth Michigan Volunteers and One hundred and eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers were moved in rear of the crest, a quarter of a mile farther back, and commenced building quarters.

November 28.-received orders to move; broke camp about 12 o’clock at night and marched to the rear line, near Fort Blaisdell.

November 29.-we halted at 4 a. m. and rested until 8 a. m., when we marched and came into our present camp, near Fort Welch, arriving at about 11 a. m., where we have since remained and commenced to build quarters.

December 9.-We received orders to be ready to march at 6.30 a.m.; started from camp at that time, and marched down the Vaughan road, precede by cavalry, which skirmished with the enemy until we reached Hatcher’s Run, where the enemy were strongly intrenched on the south bank. The One hundred and fortieth Pennsylvania Volunteers had been deployed as skirmishers, and lost considerably in regard to the strength engaged, when the Second New York Artillery and two companies of the Sixty-first New York Volunteers were ordered to cross the stream, which they did in a very excellent style. They plunged in the water in spite of the extreme cold, crossed the run swimming, and on reaching the other bank dove by a gallant attack the enemy out of their works, and took possession of the same, notwithstanding the many obstacles which had obstructed their way. The Sixty-first New York Volunteers was then place on picket, and remained there until 2 p. m. of the 10th.

December 10.-We received orders to withdraw. While so doing the enemy attacked our line with vigor, but were driven back with slight loss on our part. We then marched back to our old camp, which was done in good order, and arrived there about dark, nothing of importance having occurred since that time.

Second Brigade, First Division.

November 1.-This brigade was reorganized, in compliance with Special Orders, 555, headquarters First Division, Second Army corps, Colonel Robert Nugent assuming command. Camp was formed and headquarters established in the field near the Smith house, where it remained until the 6th.

November 6.-The command moved to the left and rear of Fort Davis, near the Chieves house, where it was employed in drills and military instruction until the 28th.

November 28.-received orders to march to the left and relieve a portion of the Ninth Corps. This brigade moved and encamped in the rear of Fort Gregg, since which time it has been employed in picket duty.

[December.]-Since last report this brigade has remained in camp near Fort Gregg, engaged in drill and military instruction, having

brigade and battalion drills as often as weather and other circumstance would permit. This brigade was paraded to witness the execution of deserters on the 16th, 23d, and 30th of the month, and have furnished daily details for picket.

Third Brigade, First Division.

November 5.-Moved a portion of the brigade to the support of Fort Rice, on the front line of works.

November 30.-This brigade moved with the division to relieve the Ninth Army Corps. During the month the brigade garrisoned Forts Bross, Blaisdell, Patrick Kelly, and Stevenson.

December 9.-Broke camp, leaving the Fifty-seventh and One hundred and twenty-sixth New York Volunteers behind, and moved with the division to Hatcher’s Run. The brigade wa kept in reserve and on the right of the position. The advance of the division crossed Hatcher’s Run, skirmishing with the enemy.

December 10.-In the afternoon we returned to our original encampment, skirmishing with the enemy as we retired, the brigade covering the rear of the division; still in camp, the brigade being in reserve to the remainder of the division.

Consolidated Brigade, First Division.

August 12.-In compliance with orders from division headquarters this command broke camp at 4.30 p. m. and marched to City Point, remaining there all night.

August 13.-At 11.30 a. m. embarked aboard transports, dropping down the river a few miles, and remained at anchor until midnight, when we were ordered to Deep Bottom.

August 14.-We debarked at Deep Bottom at 6 a. m. At 12 m. formed line of battle near the New Market road. Engaged with the enemy immediately after forming line, fighting until late in the evening, when the brigade was withdrawn, after capturing a portion of the enemy’s works.

August 15.-Early in the morning the command was ordered to the right of the line, which movement was executed. Being in support, the brigade lay encamped until 8 p. m. of the 20th, when it marched across the James and Appomattox Rivers to its former position in front of Petersburg.

August 21.-At 11 a. m. it was ordered to the left of the Fifth Corps, on the Weldon railroad.

August 23.-At 8 p. m. was ordered to move on the railroad and destroy the track, which was done, in conduction with a detachment of cavalry, as far as Reams’ Station. The brigade occupied a part of the old works thrown up by the Sixth Corps that night.

August 24.-Proceeded early to destroy the track south of the station. At dusk moved back to Reams’ Station, occupying a portion of the works parallel to the railroad until 10 a. m. the next day.

August 25.-Our skirmishers were attacked by the enemy; the engagement soon became general, the enemy charging three times, each charge being signally defeated. About 5 p. m. he charge in over-whiling force, and finding the enemy had turned both flanks the brigade was force, and finding the enemy had turned both flanks, the brigade was forced to retire, losing a number of prisoners. The brigade soon rallied, and attacking the enemy in turn recaptured a large por-

tion of the work. At dark it retired to a position on the left flank of the Fifth Corps, where it remained in line until noon of the 27th, when it was withdrawn to the present location before Petersburg.

October 1.-Early in the morning the brigade relieved part of the Second Division in the front line of works.

October 5.-This brigade was placed in reserve in rear of Forts Haskell and Stedman.

October 24.-At dark we relieved the Third Division and placed garrisons in Batteries Nos. 21 and 24, Forts Sedgwick, Davis, and Hays.

Fourth Brigade, First Division.

August 12.-The brigade received orders to march, and moving toward City Point arrived there about 10 p. m.

August 13.-The command embarked at the landing, and at 10.30 p. m. moved up for Deep Bottom, landing at the latter place about 9 a. m. next day.

August 14.-Moved up about four miles and formed in line of battle on the New Market road. The brigade, not being engaged with the enemy, was hell in reserve as a support the greater part of the time.

August 20.-The command fell back at night across the James River, and arrived at its old camp the next morning at 8 a. m.

August 21.-After a half of about four hours the command moved toward the Weldon railroad, arriving near the Fifth Corps about 3 p. m.

August 22.-Moved for the railroad and commenced an attack on our left, and about 3 p. m. the fight began, lasting until dark, our loss being 8. After night the brigade fell back to the Williams house and remained there until 27th, when the brigade, in connection with the rarest of the division, moved up to the Avery house and went into camp.

September 5.-The command moved to the left and encamped near the Jones house; the troops employed chiefly on fatigue duty.

September 24.-Moved to the right and relieved Colonel Abbot’s brigade, of the Tenth Corps, on the front line.

September 26.-The line was moved to the right, extending from Fort Stedman to Fort Haskell, where it remained at the close of the month.

[October.]-During the month the command occupied a portion of the line of works in front of Petersburg. There were no engagements during the first part of the month.

October 15.-Colonel Mulholland, One hundred and sixteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assumed command, relieving Lieutenant-Colonel Glenny, Sixty-fourth New York Volunteers.

October 27.-In the evening a portion of the command-One hundred and forty-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, assisted by Captain H. D. Price, One hundred and sixteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and acting aide-de-camp of the brigade-stormed a rebel work in front of Fort Morton, capturing the entire works, a colonel, lieutenant-colonel, 2 line officers, and a small number of enlisted men as prisoners. In half an hour afterward, our support failing to come up, the rebels rallied and attacked the small number of men, compelling them to retire, with 1 commissioned officer and 19 men captured and Captain H. D. Price killed. It was a very gallant affair, and too much credit and praise cannot be rendered to the officers and men participating in it.

October 30.-During the night the brigade was relieved and ordered to the Southall house on reserve.

November 29.-The command moved from its camp in front of Petersburg in the morning to the left of the line near the Weldon railroad, where it halted and went into camp.

December 9.-The command marched with the division in the morning and participated in the reconnaissance of Hatcher’s Run.

December 10.-Returned without loss.

Second Division.

August 1 to 12.-The division was in reserve camp, at which time, in obedience to orders, it broke camp and with the corps proceeded to City Point; embarked on transports.

August 14.-Disembarked at Deep Bottom and participated in the engagement at that place.

August 20.-Recrossed to the south side of the James River during the night and returned by way of Bermuda Hundred to the line in front of Petersburg, and massed in rear of the Ninth Corps; remained there until the afternoon of the 23d.

August 23.-Ordered to Reams’ Station; bivouacked at night at White Oak Church.

August 24.-Resumed march at 4 a. m., arriving at the station at 9 a. m.

August 25.-Took part in the engagement at that place, and at night returned to reserve camp.

October 25.-The division occupied the line and garrisoned forts in front of Petersburg up to this date, when it accompanied Third Division of corps on reconnaissance to the extreme left.

October 27.-Heavily engaged with the enemy during the day at Hatcher’s Run and Burgess’ farm; during the night fell back.

October 28.-Returned to Fort Bross, and at night reoccupied lines and forts.

November 29.-The division garrisoned forts and batteries and occupied works before Petersburg up to the night of this date, when it was relieved by a portion of the Ninth Corps.

November 30.-Moved to the left in the vicinity of Yellow Tavern and went into camp.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

August 1 to 12.-The brigade wa in reserve camp, at which date, in obedience to orders, it broke camp, and with the corps proceeded to City Point, where it remained until the 13th instant, when it embarked on transports.

August 14.-Disembarked at Deep Bottom and participated in skirmishers near that place, but had no general engagement with the enemy.

August 20.-The corps recrossed the James River at night. This brigade being on picket on the left of the line, it was the last to be withdrawn, and returned by way of Bermuda Hundred to the line in front of Petersburg.

August 21.-Arrived about 10 a. m., massing near the Aiken house, in rear of the Ninth Corps, remaining until the afternoon of the 23rd instant, when, with the division, it was ordered to Reams’ Station; bivouacked at night at White’s house.

August 24.-Resumed the march at 3 a. m., reaching the station about 9 a. m.

August 25.-Took part in the engagement at that place, suffering a loss of 232 in killed, wounded, and missing; also lost the acting assistant inspector-general (Captain William H. Hawley) of the brigade, who was killed while in the performance of his duties at the extreme front. At night the brigade returned to its reserve camp, arriving on the following morning. A portion of the brigade now occupies a position in the front line of works near the Jerusalem plank road, and the remaining part is encamped in rear of line of works connecting with fort on the left.

[November.]-This command was assigned to a position on the main line in front of Petersburg about the 1st of the month. A portion of the command garrisoned Fort McGilvery; also Battery 5, on the extreme right of the line, resting on Appomattox River. The command remained in this position until the night of the 29th, when it was received by the Ninth Corps and transferred to the left of the line, near the Vaughan road, where it is now [November 30] encamped.

Third Division.

August 12.-The division broke camp at 3 p. m. and marched to City Point, Va.

August 13.-Embarked from that place at noon.

August 14.-Reached Deep Bottom at 1 a. m.; remained in that vicinity until the night of the 18th, when it recrossed the James River and marched to the trenches before Petersburg, relieving a portion of the Night Army Corps, where [August 31] it still remains.

[September.]-The division lay in front of Petersburg during the month. Nothing of note occurred.

October 1.-The division was relieved from the front line and ordered to move up to the extreme left of the army near Pebbles’ house.

October 2.-An advance was made to feel the enemy’s position; after some skirmishing the enemy were driven from their first line of works near the South Side Railroad.

October 5.-The division returned at night, and assumed it s old position in the front line of works. Up to the 24th heavy details for working parties on the forts were furnished.

October 24.-The division was again relieved from the front line and massed near the Southall house.

October 26.-Marched toward the Weldon railroad and participated in a reconnaissance in force of Second Corps near Boydton road.

October 28.-Returned to the same position previously held in front line.

The command remained in the trenches in front of Petersburg.

November 5.-The enemy made an attack on the picket-line of the Third Brigade and was handsomely repulsed with considerable loss. Nothing of importance occurred since.

November 29.-The division, with the remainder of the corps, was relieved from the trenches by the Ninth Army Corps.

November 30.-Marched to the left, taking a position formerly occupied by the Ninth Corps, near the extreme left of our line.

December 6 [7].-Moved from camp in front of rear line of works by way of Jerusalem plank road to the Nottoway River.

December 7 [8].-Moved to Chambliss’ farm.

December 8 [9]. – Moved to Jarratt’s Station, on Weldon railroad, and commenced the destruction of the track.

December 9 [10]. – Moved toward the entrenchments on the return.

December 10 [11]. – Reached Nottoway River and bivouacked on the north side.

December 11 [12]. – Reached present camp, in front of Fort Clarke and Fort Siebert, between Vaughan and Halifax roads.

First Brigade, Third Division.

August 12. – The brigade broke camp at 1 p. m. and marched to City Point.

August 13. – Went on board of transports at noon, and at 10 p. m. sailed to Deep Bottom, where it disembarked at daylight next morning and immediately advanced skirmishers, and was soon engaged with the enemy’s outposts. It remained in the vicinity of Deep Bottom, doing it share of skirmishing, until the night of the 18th.

August 18. – Recrossed the James and marched to the trenches before Petersburg, relieving a division of the Ninth Corps in a position formerly occupied by the Fifth Corps, where it now [August 31] remains. The brigade has remained in the trenches during the month.

September 10. – It captured a portion of the enemy’s picket in our front and established a better line for ourselves. Otherwise, nothing of importance has occurred.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

August 1. – Brigade was commanded by Colonel H. J. Madill and was encamped near Petersburg, Va.

August 5. – A part of the Sixty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers was mustered out of service by reason of the expiration of their time, and the remainder were transferred to the Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, First Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps. The number mustered out was 18 commissioned officers and 206 enlisted men;transferred, 5 commissioned officers and 350 enlisted men.

August 11. – Colonel Madill, commanding brigade, received a leave of absence on surgeon’s certificate of disability, and Colonel C. A. Craig, One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assumed command.

August 12. – Command received marching orders and proceeded to City Point, Va., the same day.

August 13. – Embarked at City Point, going up James River to Deep Bottom, Va.

August 14. – Arrived in the morning and disembarked.

August 15. – We were temporarily transferred to the Tenth Corps (General D. B. Birney), and were sent on a reconnaissance to Charles City road. We met the enemy and drove them one mile and a half, taking position on the road as ordered; withdrew the same evening and rejoined the Second Division, Tenth Corps.

August 16. – Participated in the battle of this date. In the two actions the brigade sustained a loss of our commanding officer (Colonel C. A. Craig) killed, 8 commissioned officers wounded, and 3 missing; 12 enlisted men killed, 98 wounded, and 81 missing. After the action of the 16th Colonel John Pulford, Fifth Michigan Volunteers, assumed command.

August 17. – Rejoined our own division and corps.

August 18. – Crossed to the south side of the James River and marched to the vicinity of Petersburg, a distance of over twenty miles.

August 19. – Arrived in the morning; relieved one division of the Ninth Corps, bringing nearly the whole command on the picket-line, where we remained in nearly the same position until the 25th.

August 25. – A portion of the brigade was relieved and went, together with the Third Brigade, the whole under command of Colonel Robert McAllister, of the Third Brigade, to the support, of the Second Corps, which was engaged with the enemy near Reams’ Station, on the Weldon railroad. We were placed in position to protect their left flank, remaining until after midnight, at which time the brigade was withdrawn and marched back to the position that we occupied in the morning.

August 26. – General B. R. Pierce arrived and assumed command of the brigade. Our lines were shortened after returning and the command strengthened our earth-works. We occupy the same position at the present time.

[September.] – This brigade has been in position during the month along the breast-works between Forts Hays and Davis, furnishing heavy details for picket and fatigue duty.

October 1. – The regiments of this brigade occupied the line of breastworks on either side of Fort Alexander Hays, except the Firts Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, which garrisoned Fort Bross, on the Norfolk railroad. The brigade picketed its own front and furnished large fatigue details for working on Fort Sedgwick, covered ways, corduroy roads, & c.

October 24. – In the evening the brigade was withdrawn from the front and massed in the open field near the Southall house, where it remained until the afternoon of the 26th.

October 26. – About 2 p. m. this brigade, in conjunction with the First and Third Brigades, marched to the Vaughan house, on the Weldon railroad, and bivouacked for the night.

October 27. – At 4 a. m. the brigade marched via the Halifax and Vaughan roads to the Boydton plank road and participated in the engagement at that place, suffering a loss in killed, wounded, and missing of 265. At 11 p. m. the brigade withdrew, marching on the plank road it advanced on in the morning; bivouacked for the night near the Wyatt house.

October 28. – About 12 m. the brigade resumed its march and arrived at the Southall house about sunset.

October 29. – In the evening, under cover of darkness, the brigade moved to the front and now garrisons Fort Davis, Fort Alexander Hays, and Battery Numbers 24. The balance of this brigade now occupies the curtains between Fort Davis and Battery Numbers 24.

November 1. – This brigade garrisoned Fort Davis and Fort Alexander Hays and occupied the line between the curtain of these two forts and as far to the left as Battery Numbers 24. It remained in this position, doing the usual amount of picket and fatigue duty required to be done on this portion of the line, until the evening of the 29th.

November 29. – Being relieved by a brigade of the Ninth Corps, was withdrawn from the trenches and massed near the Southall house.

November 30. – At 7 a. m. this brigade, in conjunction with the balance of the Third Division, marched to the left to a position in the rear line, near the Peebles house, this brigade occupying the line between Forts Siebert and Emery.

December 1. – This brigade occupied the line of breast-works between Forts Siebert and Emery, on rear line of works, in vicinity of Peebles’ house.

December 3. – Moved about 500 yards in front of works and encamped.

December 7. – Broke camp at 6 a. m. and marched to the Gurley house, where the brigade joined the division which accompanied the Fifth Corps in the expedition on the Weldon railroad; marched on the Jerusalem plank road to the Nottoway River; encamped for the night on the south bank of the river.

December 8. – Took up the line of march on road leading to Jarratt’s Station, on Weldon railroad, passing Sussex Court-House and Coman’s Well; encamped about one mile and a half from the railroad.

December 9. – Marched at daylight on road leading to Jarratt’s Station, on Weldon railroad, and immediately commenced destroying the toad; moved south, burning and destroying the road to the Meherrin River; bivouacked for the night near the river.

December 10. – Took up our line of retreat; bivouacked near the Sussex Court-House for the night.

December 11. – Marched at 10 a. m.; passed Sussex Court-House about 12 m.; recrossed the Nottoway and encamped for the night about three miles north of the river, on the Jerusalem plank road.

December 12. – Marched and went into camp on the right and near the Halifax road.

December 13. – Changed camp a short distance to the right.

December 31. – The brigade is now encamped a short distance to the right and in front of the works at the Yellow House.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

August 12. – Remained in camp near Petersburg to this date, when the brigade moved to City Point, reaching there at 8 o’clock in the evening.

August 13. – Embarked on transports during the afternoon. At 10 p. m. started for Deep Bottom, arriving there about daybreak.

August 14. – Disembarked at 8 a. m. At 9 a. m. marched to New Market road. At 7 p. m. the brigade was ordered to report to General Miles, who ordered us to take position on the right near New Market road, where we remained in line until 4 o’clock next morning.

August 15. – Ordered to join our division in the rear. At 9 a. m. were again advanced to the front and left of Four-Mile Creek; massed in the woods and remained there all day and until 6 pl. m. of the 18th, when we were ordered to take position between the New Market and Malvern Hill roads, to protect the pontoon bridge, as an attack from the enemy was expected. At 10 p. m. received orders to rejoin our division, then recrossing the James River. Crossed pontoon bridge at 11 o’clock and marched back to front of Petersburg.

August 19. – Arrived there at 8 a. m. At 3 p. m. relieved the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Ninth Corps, in the works on the Norfolk and Suffolk Railroad, and took position in the entrenchments.

August 20. – Were relieved at 6 pl. m. by troops of the Eighteenth Corps. Marched to the left and took position in front of the jones house. Threw up breast-works and remained in that position until 3 p. m. of the 25th, when we received marching orders. Marched to the left, taking the Jerusalem plank road until we reached its junction with Reams’ Station road, and halted; threw up breast-works to protect the left of this army.

August 26. – Returned to and reoccupied our former position of the 25th instant, where the brigade now [August 31] remains.

[September.] – Remained in camp near Petersburg, Va., on the left of the Jerusalem plank road, until the 25th; were then relieved by a portion of the Ninth Corps; moved to the right about one mile and a half and took position in front, the left of our line resting on the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, remaining in that position until October 1.

October 1. – Moved from camp near Jerusalem plank road before Petersburg, Va.; marched to Vaughan road, on the left.

October 2. – Skirmished with the enemy, driving him back to his second line of works.

October 5 . – Returned to our former position, occupying Fort Davis and the rifle-pits and picket-line on the left.

October 24. – Broke camp and marched to the left.

October 27. – Took part in the action at Hatcher’ Run, Va.

October 31. – Returned to near former position on the right.

[The return for November contains no record of events.]

December 7. – Remained in camp near Petersburg, Va., to this date, when, at 7 a. m., the command took up line of march, arriving at the Nottoway River that evening.

December 8. – Resumed the march, passing Sussex Court-House at about 8.45 a. m.; bivouacked near Jarratt’s Station at 4 p. m.

December 9. – Marched at 6.30 a. m., passing Jarratt’s Station; halted about two miles south of it and formed in line of battle along the Weldon railroad and commenced destroying the same; bivouacked about midway between Jarratt’ Station and Hicksford. At 12 midnight received orders from General Warren that the object of the expedition having been accomplished the command would return.

December 10. – Marched toward our old position, bivouacking for the night at 6 p. m.

December 11. – Resumed the march at 7.10 a. m., passing Sussex Court-House; recrossed the Nottoway River at 5 p. m.; bivouacked for the night at about three miles from the Jerusalem plank road.

December 12. – Marched at 7 a. m., arriving at the Yellow House at 1.30 p. m.; bivouacked in front of the rear line of entrenchments, west of the Halifax road, where we still [December 31] remain.

Artillery Brigade.

August 12. – Captain A. Judson Clark, First New Jersey Artillery, assumed command.

August 13. – Moved from camp near the Deserted House to a point near Bermuda Hundred.

August 15. — Crossed James River to Deep Bottom with six batteries.

August 16. – Moved in Battery A, First Rhode Island Artillery. Batteries engaged at various times from the 15th to 19th.

August 19. – Recrossed the James River and marched to the old camp at the Deserted House.

August 21. – Four batteries moved out with the troops to the neighborhood of General Warren’s position on the Weldon railroad.

August 23. – Moved to Reams’ Station, Va.

August 225. – Engaged at battle of Reams’ station. Batteries A and B, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, and Tenth Massachusetts Battery lost their guns; the Twelfth New York Battery lost one gun; Third New Jersey Battery also engaged.

August 26. – Removed to the Jones house.

August 27. – Major Hazard resumed command. Remained at this point with six batteries in position on the line in front of Petersburg until the end of the month.

[September.] – Batteries in position on the entrenched line before Petersburg from the Appomattox to Fort Alexander Hays.

[October.] – Batteries in position on the entrenched line before Petersburg from the Appomattox to Fort Alexander Hays.

November 1 to 29. – Batteries in position on the entrenched line in front of Petersburg from the Appomattox River to the Jerusalem plank road.

November 30. – Moved to the extreme left of Army of the Potomac; still in that position.

[December.] – Five batteries on the line held by the Ninth Corps; the rest of the command on the Second Corps line and in reserve. No movements of importance during the month.

FIFTH ARMY CORPS.*

August 15. – The corps was withdrawn from the trenches in front of Petersburg, and remained in reserve until the morning of the 18th, when it broke camp at 4 a. m., and marched via the Jerusalem plank road toward the Weldon railroad, which it struck about 10 a. m. The rails were speedily destroyed for about two miles, and the Second Division (Ayres’) pushed out on the railroad toward Petersburg. It met the enemy about three-fourths of a mile from Globe Tavern. A battle ensued, in which the whole corps, to a more or less extent, participated. The enemy were repulsed.

August 19. – The enemy attacked in strong force about 4 p. m. He was repulsed with heavy loss to him, but he succeeded in carrying with him a considerable number of our men as prisoners.

August 21. – The enemy came with increased force, and made a demonstration against our left flank and at other points of our line. Although the whole of Hill’s corps and part of Beauregard’s confronted us, the enemy suffered a severe defeat, losing heavily in killed, wounded, and prisoners; six battle-flags were captured. The entire corps has during the month fought three battles and built two large forts, besides several miles of rifle-pits and breast-works, and felling large quantities of timber for abatis. It occupies the position it seized on the morning of the 18th, notwithstanding the desperate efforts of the enemy to drive us from it.

September 15. – A reconnaissance was made by the Second Brigade, Third Division, Brigadier-General Baxter, out on the Vaughan road, for the purpose of developing the position of the enemy; found them in force; the brigade returned about 12 m.

September 30. – The corps was ordered to move at 8 a. m. The divisions of Griffin and Ayres, with Hofmann’s brigade, of Crawford’s division, moved out on the road to Poplar spring Church; met the enemy at that point. Griffin’s division charged the enemy’s works on Peebles’ farm: captured them, with 1 gun and about 70 prisoners. A severe engagement was had later in the day, resulting in the repulse of the enemy. The remainder of the corps (two brigades of Third Division) remained to garrison the forts near the Weldon railroad and for the protection of this portion of the line.

During the month the corps has been constantly engaged in constructing defensive works near the Weldon railroad, making roads, and guarding a long picket-line.

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* Commanded by Major General Gouverneur K. Warren.

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October 1. – In the advance of the corps from Poplar Spring Church, the enemy attacked the Second Division (Brigadier-General Ayres) during the storm and were twice repulsed, our troops holding the ground, establishing our line and throwing up works.

October 8. – Advanced our troops, driving in the enemy’s pickets, they falling back to their works; no engagement brought on; W. W. Davis’ house burned.

October 27. – Moved to Hatcher’s Run, southwest of Petersburg, Brigadier-General Baxter, Second Brigade, Third Division, being left in works along our line; left our lines at Fort Cummings at daylight, passing through the woods in front on the left of the Ninth Corps; struck enemy’s skirmishers at 9 a. m. in the vicinity of Hatcher’s Run and above Armstrong’s Mill. The enemy behind strong works in dense woods felled trees in the run and could not be driven out. Most of the corps remained on the north side. Third Division (General Crawford) crossing to south side of run, engaged more or less all day. The command operated between Second and Ninth Corps. Third Division recrossed during night of the 27th.

October 28. – Skirmish firing occasionally. About 9 a. m. corps commenced withdrawing and returned to our former camps in the afternoon.

Casualties: 5 officers and 254 men. Officers wounded: Lieutenant Colonel J. E. Cook, Seventy-sixth New York, October 1, Chappell House; Captain J. F. Casner, Ninety-first Pennsylvania, October 27, Hatcher’s Run; Captain J. H. Closson, Ninety-first Pennsylvania, October 27, Hatcher’s Run.

[November.] – The corps has occupied a position during the month on the Weldon railroad, holding the front line west from Fort Howard and the rear line west from Fort Davison. Headquarters have remained the same.

December 7. – The corps marched at 7 a. m., taking the Jerusalem plank road to the Nottoway River, which it reached about 4 p. m. One division (Crawford’s) crossed the river on pontoons and bivouacked for the night near Sussex Court-House. The other two divisions bivouacked on the north bank of the river.

December 8. – The First and Second Divisions crossed the Nottoway at 2 a. m., and with the rest of the corps continued the march through Sussex Court-House via Coman’s Well Store to the Halifax road. This point was reached about 4 p. m. and the command massed for rest and supplies. At 6 p. m. the three divisions of the corps moved down the Weldon railroad and began its destruction southward from the railroad bridge across the Nottoway. The work of destruction was continued until midnight, when the command bivouacked where they were until daylight.

December 9. – The divisions then alternated with each other, destroying the road and continuing the movement southward, passing Jarratt’s Station and proceeding as far as Belfield, on the Meherrin River. Here considerable opposition was made by the enemy, who had strong works on the opposite bank of the river at Hicksford. All the bridges and rail being destroyed to this point, the command went into bivouac.

December 10. – At 7 a. m. the command commenced the march to return; enemy’s cavalry followed, but did but little damage; reached Sussex Court-House that night; weather very stormy and roads in very bad condition from previous rains.

December 11. – Marched at 7 a. m.; crossed the Nottoway and bivouacked about two miles from the river: weather intensely cold.

December 12. – Resumed the march at 7 a. m. and arrived back to the late camp of the corps about 4 p.l m. The command comprising the expedition were the Fifth Corps, Mott’s division of the Second Corps, and three brigades of Gregg’s division of cavalry, and a pontoon train, the whole under command of Major Ge. G. K. Warren. The Weldon railroad was destroyed for a distance of eighteen miles, and all the bridges burned as far as the road was torn up. Jarratt’s Station was also destroyed and all the railroad property there. The distance marched was about 100 miles. The weather was rainy and cold nearly the whole of the six days the command was gone. The casualties were 4 men killed, 4 wounded, and 2 officers and 92 men missing.

December 13. – The corps changed camp to a point about half way between the Halifax road and the Jerusalem plank road.

First Division.

August 15. – The division was relieved from its position on the front line near Petersburg, and remained in reserve until the 18th, when it broke camp and moved around to the left, taking possession of the Weldon railroad. The command then took a position on the left, which it has been engaged in fortifying up to this date [August 31].

The division remained in camp, near the Weldon railroad, from September 1 to 30, when it broke camp and moved in the direction of the South Side Railroad. Carried the enemy’s position near Poplar Spring Church by a charge on the same day, capturing a fort and line of their entrenchments, with a number of prisoners and one piece of artillery.

October 27. – Participated in the movement of the corps against the enemy at Hatcher’s Run.

October 28. – Returned to position preoccupied on the Squirrel Level road.

December 1 to 6. – The division remained in camp, performing the usual picket and fatigue duties.

December 6. – the division moved to a point near the Jerusalem plank road and encamped for the night.

December 7. – Took up line of march to the Nottoway River and bivouacked until 2 a. m. next morning.

December 8. – Again moved forward and reached the Weldon railroad at 8 a. m., same day.

December 9. – After the destruction of the railroad was completed, moved from Jarratt’s station in the morning in the direction of Hicksford and encamped within five miles of Hicksford.

December 10. – Moved toward Sussex Court-House about twenty miles and encamped near the Court-House.

December 11. – Took up the line of march, recrossing the Nottoway River, and bivouacked for the night.

December 12. – In the morning again moved and reached our present encampment about 4 p. m. Since then the troops have been engaged principally in building winter quarters.

First Brigade, First Division.

August 16. – The command was relieved from the front line of works and held in reserve.

Nothing of special importance occurred until the morning of the 18th, when the brigade broke camp, and marched in the direction of

the Weldon railroad. Early in the day it came upon and completely surprised the enemy’s pickets. They fled, offering but slight resistance. The railroad was taken possession of by the First Brigade, and the track immediately torn up. The command participated in the engagements on the 19th and 21st. After the engagement on the 21st the brigade was assigned to the extreme left of the line. Since that time the troops have been engaged in erecting earth-works and in strengthening their position.

[September.] – Since the last return was made the brigade occupied the entrenchments near White’ house, Va. (on the Weldon railroad), and were doing fatigue and picket duty until the morning of the 30th, when they, with the balance of the First Division, Fifth Corps, marched to near Poplar Spring Church and participated in the battles in that vicinity.

Reductions of command: The One-hundred and twenty-first, One hundred and forty-second, One hundred and forty-third, One hundred and forty-ninth, and One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers were assigned to Third Division, Fifth Corps, by General Orders, Numbers 35, headquarters Fifth corps, dated September 12, 1864. The One hundred and eighty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers were transferred to the Department of the Susquehanna by Special Orders, Numbers 225, headquarters Army of the Potomac, dated september 21, 1864.

Re-enforcements receiver: The Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry was assigned to the First Brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 123, paragraph II, headquarters First Division, Fifth Corps. The One hundred and ninety-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers were assigned to the First Brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 132, headquarters First Division, Fifth Corps, September 24, 1864.

Killed: September 30, Privates David Miller, Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry, and George Witman, One hundred and ninety-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry.

October 1 to 4. – The brigade shifted position several times, occupying the front line; then again shifting to the support of the Second and Third Brigades of the division, and to support the right of the Ninth Corps.

October 4. – At 4 p. m. the brigade moved to the rear half a mile, and went into camp and commenced to drill and discipline the troops, which are all new men, having been but one month in the military service.

October 16. – The brigade moved to the entrenchments to the right and left of Fort

——

, and were drilling and doing picket duty until the morning of the 27th.

October 27. – The brigade moved with the balance of the division two miles down the Squirrel Level road and in the direction of South Side Railroad. The command did not become actively engaged during this reconnaissance, although it held a portion of the front line, connecting on the right with the ninth Corps and on the left with the Second Brigade of the division. The losses were 6 enlisted men slightly wounded.

October 29. – The brigade, with the balance of the division, returned to their former position within the entrenchments, and are now [October 31] doing picket duty and perfecting the troops in drill and discipline.

No enlisted men have been transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps during the month.

[November.] – The command has been in the breast-works during the month near Fort Urmston, both at the right and left of Squirrel Level road, doing picket duty and perfecting the troops in drill and discipline.

December 1 to 6. – The brigade remained in the breast-works near Fort Urmston, on the Squirrel Level road, doing picket duty and perfecting the troops in drill and discipline.

December 6. – The brigade moved with the balance of the division to a point near the Jerusalem plank road and encamped for the night.

December 7. – Took up the line of march, moving along the Jerusalem plank road, reaching the Nottoway River, and encamped for the night.

December 8. – The brigade again moved forward and at 8 p. m. reached the Weldon railroad and was deployed for skirmishing while the track was being destroyed by the troops of the corps, and encamped near Jarratt’s Station.

December 9. – At 10 a. m. the command moved forward along the line of the Weldon railroad in the direction of Hicksford, assisting in the destruction of the railroad, and encamped within about five miles of Hicksford.

December 10. – The command moved in the direction of Sussex Court-House on the return, marching about twenty miles, and encamped near the Court-House at about 7 p. m.

December 11. – Took up the line of march, recrossing the Nottoway, and went into camp.

December 12. – At 7 a. m. the command again took up the line of march and arrived near the present encampment about 1 pl. m., the whole movement resulting in the loss of a few stragglers.

Since the 12th the command has been doing picket duty and engaged in the construction on winter quarters.

Third Brigade, First Division.

September 1 to 29. – In the trenches on the Weldon railroad, performing the usual camp and picket duties.

September 30. – Engaged in the action of Pegram’s farm, suffering a loss of 34 killed, 196 wounded, and 11 missing.

October 1 to 26. – Remained in camp near Poplar Grove Church, Va., performing the usual camp and picket duties.

October 27. – Broke camp and took up line of march in the direction of the South Side Railroad. On arriving within three or four miles of the railroad the brigade halted and formed line of battle; remained in this position until next morning.

October 28. – Withdrew, covering the withdrawal of the troops. In this operation the brigade suffered a loss of 1 enlisted man killed, 6 wounded, and 2 missing.

In camp near Poplar Grove Church, Va., to 31st.

November 1 to 30. – Remained in camp before Petersburg, Va., performing the usual camp and picket duties.

[December.] – Remained in camp west of Weldon railroad.

December 6. – The brigade was relieved by a portion of the Second Corps and marched toward the Jerusalem plank road and bivouacked for the night.

December 7. – Took up line of march and participated in the raid toward Weldon, destroying several miles of the railroad.

December 12. – Returned to camp.

December 14. – The brigade was moved to a suitable camping-ground. From that time to December 31 the troops have been employed in constructing winter quarters and have performed the usual camp and picket duties.

Second Division.

August 2. – Second Brigade ordered to the left of the line to support Tilton’s brigade.

August 14, – Relieved and returned to camp with the main portion of the division.

August 18. – Moved at 4.45 a. m. to Weldon railroad; formed and advanced in the direction of Petersburg, right and left up the railroad, and engaged the enemy.

August 19, – Enemy attacked the right flank and succeeded in capturing Brigadier General Joseph Hayes, commanding First Brigade, and a number of prisoners.

August 20. – Remained in same position.

August 21. – At 1 a. m. fell back several hundred yards to a new position. At 8 a. m. same day enemy attacked in heavy columns, but was repulsed with heavy losses. In same position remainder of month.

September 30. – The command left camp on the Weldon railroad at 8 a. m; moved two miles to the left; assumed a new position on the Squirrel Level road.

October 27. – Moved several miles west of the Weldon railroad; formed in line of battle and advanced across Hatcher’s Run; charged the enemy’s skirmishers, drove them from their ground, and captured about 250 prisoners.

October 28. – Returned to camp. Nothing worthy of note has transpired since.

[November.] – The division has not moved since last return. In the First Brigade the regular infantry were ordered to New York City, and left the field on the 2nd instant. In the Second Brigade, Companies B and C, Purnell Legion, Maryland Volunteer Cavalry, 128 men, were permanently assigned as infantry to the Eighth maryland Volunteers, by Special Orders, Numbers 402, paragraph 27, November 17, 1864, War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, D. C. In the Third Brigade the Third and Fourth Regiments Delaware Volunteers left on furlough – Special Orders, Numbers 295, Army of the Potomac – on the 2nd and returned on the 17th. Colonel W. Sergeant, Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded this brigade during the absence of Colonel Grimshaw. Bvt. Brigadier General James Gwyn was assigned to the command of the brigade, Special Orders, Numbers 32, headquarters Second Division, and took command on the 21st instant, relieving Colonel A. H. Grimshaw, Fourth Delaware Volunteers.

First Brigade, Second Division.

August 18. – Moved to Weldon railroad; formed line of battle and advanced in direction of Petersburg, right and left of railroad, and engaged the enemy.

August 19. – The enemy attacked the troops on the right of the division, pierced their lines, and moved up in the rear and on the flank of brigade, capturing Brigadier General Joseph Hayes, U. S. Volunteers, and a number of prisoners.

August 20. – Remained in same position.

August 21. – At 1 a. m. fell back several hundred yards to a new position. At 8 a. m. same day the enemy attacked the left flank in heavy columns, but was repulsed with great loss. Remained in same position on the Weldon railroad the remainder of the month.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

August 2. – Moved to the front and entrenched; remained as support to Tilton’s brigade.

August 14. – Relieved from duty in front, and encamped two miles in rear.

August 18. – Moved at 4.45 a. m. toward Weldon railroad; formed near Yellow House and advanced to left of railroad in direction of Petersburg; drove the enemy some distance, when a general engagement ensued, in which the brigade sustained a considerable loss.

August 19. – All remained quiet, except some demonstration by the enemy upon our picket-line.

August 20. – Our skirmishers charged the enemy’s picket-line, capturing 1 commissioned officer and 13 men; during the night withdrew from our advanced position, and occupied the main works near Yellow House.

August 21. – Early in the morning the enemy made several successive charges, but were repulsed with severe loss. In this engagement we sustained the loss of our brigade commander, Colonel Dushane, with several line officers, and a number of men. Remainder of the month remained unmolested in the position of the 21st instant.

September 16. – About 8 a. m. the enemy advanced upon our picket-line, when a brisk skirmish ensued, in which the brigade sustained a loss of 1 commissioned officer and 60 enlisted men captured, 1 enlisted man killed and 5 wounded.

October 1. – The enemy assaulted our line, driving in a portion of the picket-line, but were finally repulsed and driven back with a loss to the brigade of 6 men killed and 8 wounded.

October 8. – Our skirmishers advanced, driving the enemy into his works and taking 2 prisoners of war. At night we retired to our original line, losing 1 man killed, 3 wounded, and 6 captured.

October 23. – The Purnell Legion, Maryland Volunteers, with an aggregate of 554, was mustered out of service, their term having expired.

October 27. – The brigade marched several miles west of Weldon railroad, formed in line, and advanced across Hatcher’s Run; charged the enemy’s skirmishers, drove them from the ground, and captured 233 prisoners of war.

October 28. – Returned to camp.

[November.] – Companies B and C, Purnell Cavalry, 128 enlisted men, were permanently assigned to the Eighth Maryland Volunteer Infantry as infantry by Special Orders, Numbers 402, November 17, 1864, War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, D. C.

December 7. – The brigade left the camp near the Yellow House, on the Weldon railroad, and went with the corps and part of the Second Army Corps and cavalry, all under the command of Major-General Warren, on the expedition for the demolition of the Weldon railroad as far as Hicksford, which having accomplished, returned on the 12th and encamped in rear of headquarters Army of the Potomac.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

August 14. – The brigade was massed in rear of its former position in front of Petersburg.

August 18. – Moved on the Weldon railroad; met the enemy near the Yellow House, just beyond the railroad; were engaged in action

and skirmishing with the enemy until the evening of the 21st, when they retired from our front; since then have been engaged in strengthening our position.

[September.[- The Third Brigade was organized September 14, 1864, and stationed in the works built by Colonel Hofmann’s command, near the Yellow House, on the Weldon railroad, and remained in the same position until September 30, when it moved toward the left. Headquarters changed to the field, and occupied a position on the Squirrel Level road. Earth-works were thrown up during the night.

October 1 and 2. – The brigade in the position occupied on the Squirrel Level road; was engaged, with a loss of 30 officers and men.

October 8. – Took part in the advance of the pickets and formed the supporting column, suffering the loss of 15 officers and men killed, wounded, and missing.

October 10. – The brigade moved to the right and encamped near the Yellow House in reserve.

October 27. – Took part in the movement of the corps to the left.

October 28. – Returned to the camp on the 27th, which position it occupies at present.

[November.] – The brigade has not moved during the month.

November 2. – The Third and Fourth Delaware Volunteers left for Washington, in compliance with Special Orders, Numbers 295, headquarters Army of the Potomac, dated November 1, 1864, and returned on the 17th.

During Colonel Grimshaw’s absence with his regiment Colonel Sergeant, Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded the brigade. Brevet Brigadier-General Gwyn, U. S. Volunteers, was assigned to the command of the brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 32, headquarters Second Division, Fifth Army Corps, dated November 20, 1864, and assumed command on the 21st instant.

[December.] – The brigade took part in the movement of the corps to Hicksford, on the Weldon railroad.

December 7. – Leaving the camp at which it was stationed at last report, the railroad track was torn up and destroyed at intervals, amounting in all to eight lengths of the brigade.

December 10. – The return was commenced.

December 11. – Crossed the Nottoway in the evening.

December 12. – Arrived at the position at present occupied in the afternoon.

The casualties during the reconnaissance were 1 man killed, 1 officer and 6 men missing. Colonel William Sergeant, Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assumed command of the brigade during the absence of General Gwyn, temporarily commanding Second Division since the 22nd instant.

Third Division.

August 18. – Moved from position on Jerusalem plank road to the Blick house, on Weldon railroad, five miles from Petersburg; engaged with the enemy; about 150 officers and men of the Sixteenth Maine captured.

August 19. – General Bragg’s brigade, of the Fourth Division, reported for temporary duty; engaged with the enemy, who captured about 1,500 officers and men of the division.

August 21. – The Second Brigade moved to the support of General Griffin, First Division. The remnants of the One hundred and ninetieth and One hundred and ninety-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, of the Third Brigade, were transferred to the First Brigade.

August 23. – Engaged in destroying Weldon railroad.

August 25. – Colonel Wheelock’s (Second) brigade moved to the left of General Griffin’s (First) division and the Weldon railroad, facing south, and threw up breast-works.

Division headquarters remain in same place as last month.

September 2. – One brigade went on a reconnaissance to support the cavalry one mile down the Halifax road, but soon returned to camp; no casualties.

September 6 to 13. – The troops were building breast-works in the rear and instructing themselves in the drill. The Seventh Indiana, of Bragg’s brigade, went home by reason of expiration of term of service, and the veterans and recruits belonging to it turned over to the Nineteenth Indiana Volunteers.

September 13. – The division paraded in front of corps headquarters to witness a medal presentation to three men who had captured rebel flags.

September 16. – The Second Brigade (General Baxter) was ordered to garrison Forts Dushane, Wadsworth, and Davison.

September 30. – The Third Brigade accompanied General Ayres, Second Division, Fifth Corps, on the movement toward the Pegram house and formed in line of battle.

October 27. – At 4 a. m. the division, with the exception of the Second Brigade, under Brigadier-General Baxter, which was left behind to hold the old works, covering an extent of some four miles, moved toward the South Side Railroad, and took part in the operations of the day, with an aggregate loss of 47, capturing a large number of prisoners, and relieving many of the Second Corps who had been captured.

October 28. – The reconnaissance being successful, the division returned to this place [Before Petersburg.] .

[November.] – The division remains in nearly the same position as last return. Nothing of consequence has occurred.

December 5. – The division moved from its position in the front line of works and bivouacked on the Jerusalem plank road about three miles from former position.

December 7. – The corps move on the Jerusalem plank road, this division taking the advance; crossed the Nottoway and marched to Sussex Court-House, where we bivouacked at 9 p. m.

December 8. – Moved forward again and toward night reached the Weldon railroad, which we commenced tearing up.

December 9. – Moved toward Hicksford and recommenced tearing up railroad, which was continued until near dark.

December 10. – Returned to camp, which was reached without serious interruption on the afternoon of the 12th. Since then the division has remained stationary, the men engaged in building huts and making themselves comfortable.

First Brigade, Third Division.

August 15. – The brigade was relieved from duty at Fort Warren, on the Jerusalem plank road, and encamped in rear of headquarters Third Division as reserve.

August 18. – At 4 a. m. struck tents and moved toward the Weldon railroad, arriving at Six-Mile House about noon; formed line of battle

facing north; advanced and engaged the enemy; the same night threw up a lie of earth-works on east side of the railroad, our left resting on the railroad.

August 19. – The enemy attacked in force and captured some officers and a large number of enlisted men as prisoners.

August 20. – We were withdrawn to the second line of battle, and participated in the battle of the 21st, which resulted in the repulse of the enemy. Since then we have been in reserve, encamped near the Yellow House.

September 1. – Independent Battalion Wisconsin Volunteers assigned to Bragg’s brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 251, headquarters Fifth Army Corps.

September 6. – The term of service of the seventh Indiana Volunteers having expired, that regiment left for Indiana; 107 men whose term had not expired were temporarily assigned to Nineteenth Indiana Volunteers. The First Brigade, Third Division, was organized by General Orders, Numbers 10, Third Division headquarters, September 13, 1864, from the old First Brigade, Fourth Division, with the addition of the following regiments, viz: One hundred and twenty-first, One hundred and forty-second, One hundred and forty-third, One hundred and forty-ninth, and One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

September 17. – The One hundred and twenty-first and One hundred and forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers were assigned to Third Brigade, Third Division, by Special Orders, Numbers 64, Third Division headquarters.

[October.] – This brigade has remained near the Weldon railroad since last return, being the greater part of the time in reserve.

October 13. – The Nineteenth Indiana Volunteers (15 officers and 393 men) reported to Second Corps, in compliance with Special Orders, No. 79, Third Division, of the 12th instant, having been transferred by Special Orders, Numbers 260, headquarters Army of the Potomac, September 27, 1864.

October 26. – The headquarters wagons were loaded and sent to City Point in the evening.

October 27. – at 4 a. m. the brigade moved toward the South Side Railroad, taking part in the operations of the day, with a total loss of 1 officer and 17 men, capturing from the enemy 227 prisoners, and releasing many of our own men who had been captured.

October 28. – Returned to camp.

November 3. – The First Battalion New York state sharpshooters was ordered to report at division headquarters by special Orders, Numbers 100, from Third Division headquarters.

December 2. – The transfer of the Independent Battalion Wisconsin Volunteers, with the Sixth Wisconsin Veteran Volunteers, was completed in compliance with War Department Special Orders, Numbers 411, of November 22, 1864.

December 6. – Broke camp and moved with Third Division outside the fortifications near the Jerusalem plank road.

December 7. – Moved down the plank road to Sussex Court-House.

December 8. – Reached railroad near Nottoway bridge and engaged in its destruction.

December 9. – Continued the destruction of the road and burned the bridge over Three-Mile Creek.

December 10 to 12. – Marched for old camp, which was reached on the evening of the 12th. On the 11th the brigade was rear guard.

December 16. – Moved across the Jerusalem plank road and were located in a new camp, where we have since been putting up winter quarters.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

August 1. – Brigade on picket on west side of Jerusalem plank road, near Jones’ house; remained until the 15th instant.

August 15. – Colonel R. Coulter, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, assumed command; brigade was relieved from picket duty by a portion of Fourth Division, Ninth Corps; marched two miles to the rear and went into camp.

August 18. – Broke camp at daylight; marched five miles to Weldon railroad, near the Yellow House; formed in line of battle; attacked the enemy’s skirmishers; drove them a mile with slight loss. Colonel Wheelock, Ninety-seventh New York Volunteers, relieved Colonel R. Coulter from command of the brigade by order of General Crawford; threw up temporary breast-works, skirmishing all night; connected our skirmishers on the right with Third Brigade and on the left with First Brigade, Third Division, Fifth Army corps. Five companies of Ninety-fourth New York Volunteers were sent to support the skirmish line of Third Brigade.

August 19. – Strengthened our works and extended them forty rods. At 1 p. m. enemy advanced in three lines of battle, drove in our skirmishers, turned our right and left flanks, and formed in line of battle in our rear; brigade was moved across our breast works, faced by the rear rank, and repulsed the enemy, capturing 1 flag and 60 prisoners. Our loss was quite heavy in prisoners; casualties few.

August 20. – Fell back half a mile; threw up works near the Blick house.

August 21. – Moved to the support of Fourth Division; took position in the breast-works near Yellow House.

August 23. – Moved at 8 a. m. to the Weldon railroad, and destroyed two miles of track.

August 25. – Moved at 2 p. m. about a mile to the left; built breastworks near the Perkins house.

August 29. – General Baxter resumed command of brigade.

August 30 and 31. – Sent a detail of 400 men to build a fort near Blick’s house.

September 1. – In camp near Weldon railroad.

September 2. – Brigade moved at 2 a. m. to support cavalry on a reconnaissance; marched about a mile on the Halifax road and halted until daylight; marched back to Yellow House and went outside the works about ten rods; remained there until 10 a. m., when the cavalry returned, then marched back to camp; no casualties.

September 6.- Moved out at 5.30 a. m. and built breast-works to connect with, the works of Ninth Corps at the Gurley house.

September 13. – Marched to corps headquarters to witness presentation of medal to Private Reed, Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

September 14. – First and Second Brigades consolidated. Formed line at 4 a. m. and went on a reconnaissance to the vicinity of Poplar Spring Church; found the enemy in force behind works; drove in their pickets and returned to camp with small loss.

September 16. – Ordered to garrison Forts Wadsworth and Dushane.

September 25. – Ninety-fourth New York Volunteers ordered to garrison Fort Davison.

September 29. – Made a reconnaissance at 3 p. m. to Poplar Spring Church with Eleventh, Eighty-eight, and Ninetieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Thirty-ninth Massachusetts, and One hundred and fourth

New York Volunteers; drove the enemy’s skirmishers more than a mile and advanced until we were opened on with artillery. The enemy attempted to turn our right flank with a heavy line of skirmishers, supported by a line of battle, but we withdrew to our works in good order and with no loss.

[October.] – This brigade had not marched during the month, but occupies nearly the same position as formerly in the works and entrenchments near the Weldon railroad, with entrenchments in the rear line.

October 27. – The Fifth corps moved to the left, with the exception of this brigade, which was left to hold the line, covering an extent of some four miles.

October 28. – The corps returned, when the brigade was partially got together.

[November.] – The brigade remains in same position. Nothing of importance has transpired during the month.

December 5. – Brigade moved from its position in the front line of works, east of the Halifax road, and bivouacked on the Jerusalem plank road, about three miles from its former position.

December 7. – The corps moved on the Jerusalem plank road, this brigade taking the advance; crossed the Nottoway and reached Sussex Court-House at 9 p.l m., where it bivouacked.

December 8. – Moved forward again and toward night reached the Weldon railroad, which we commenced tearing up.

December 9. – Moved toward Hicksford and recommenced tearing up railroad, which was continued until near dark.

December 10. – Returned to camp, which was reached without serious interruption on the afternoon of the 12th. Since then the brigade has remained stationary, the men being engaged in building huts and otherwise making themselves comfortable.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

August 18. – Moved to the Weldon railroad near Yellow House, six miles from Petersburg, and was engaged 18th, 19th, and 21st. On the 18th the Sixth Wisconsin lost 19 men killed and wounded; the other regiments were not engaged.

August 19. – The brigade, being deployed as pickets and skirmishers, its line extending over a mile, the enemy attacked in the center by column, and the left wing was broken and lost heavily in prisoners. All of the First Battalion New York Sharpshooters, that were present for duty (3 officers and 50 men) were captured; also a detachment of 2 officers and 50 men of the Seventh Indiana. The above detachments were on picket in pits on the extreme left.

August 21. – Mahone’s division attacked in force, and the brigade captured about 150 officers and men, including a colonel and lieutenant-colonel.

September 2. – Troops under arms at 5.30 p. m.; nothing done.

September 13. – Four regiments transferred to Third Division.

September 14. – Moved camp to rear of corps headquarters.

September 15. – Moved to works on left of line; returned at 7.30 p. m.

September 16. – Moved to camp vacated by General Baxter’s brigade.

September 17. – One hundred and twenty-first and One hundred and forty second Pennsylvania Volunteers reported for duty.

September 19. – Troops under arms at 5.30 a. m.; nothing done.

September 30. – Left camp at 8 a. m.; moved to Pegram’s house and formed in line of battle.

October 1. – The brigade at daylight occupied the advanced position near the Pegram house, tho which it had been assigned on the night of September 30. Being attacked by the enemy, in obedience to orders retreated to the main lie of the army and was then put into position on the right of General ayres’ division, being temporarily attached to it.

October 3. – Rejoined the Third Division and reoccupied the old camps near Yellow House.

October 6. – The brigade moved camp to the right of the division line, near Fort Alexander Hays.

October 27. – Moved with the division to Hatcher’s Run and advanced on the left of the run; a slight skirmish with the enemy’s skirmishers; moved in retreat during the night, reaching General Griffin’s left at daylight.

October 28. – Moved back to the old camp near Fort Alexander Hays.

December 5. – The brigade relieved by First Brigade, First Division, Sixth Army Corps, and moved from camp, massing near Smith’s house.

December 6 [7]. – Moved with division at 6 a. m.; moved down the Jerusalem plank road; crossed the Nottoway River, and encamped at Sussex Court-House at 8.30 p. m.

December 7[8]. – Moved at 4.30 o’clock in advance of the expedition; slight skirmish with enemy’s cavalry; encamped at 3 p. m. Moved at 6 p. m. and began destruction of Weldon railroad. At 11 p. m. rested for the night.

December 8[9]. – Moved forward at 8 o’clock and continued destruction of railroad near Belfield.

December 10. – Moved at 8 a. m. on return, and at 9 p. m. rested for the night.

December 11. – Moved at 8 a. m., crossing the Nottoway River and resting for the night near

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Church.

December 12. – Moved at 8 a. m. and reached camp near Smith’s house at 4.30 p. m.

December 14. – Moved to camp on Lee’s Mill road and commenced the erection of quarters.

Artillery Brigade.

[August.] – Nothing of importance occurred in the command during the early part or middle of the month.

August 18. – The command broke camp near the Avery house and marched to the Petersburg and Weldon Railroad. The command participated in the engagement around the Yellow Tavern, and still [August 31] remains at that place.

[September.] – No movement of importance transpired in the command up to the 30th instant. The attention of battery commanders has been devoted to drilling their men and strengthening their works. Most of the batteries have remained in their old positions of the Weldon railroad.

September 30. – Three batteries, H, D, and B, First New York, accompanied Griffin’s and Ayres’ divisions to the left, near Poplar Grove Church, and participated in the engagement at that point. The remaining batteries are still in position on the Weldon railroad.

[October.] – Nothing of importance transpired during the first and middle of the month. The command occupied its old position on and near the Weldon and Petersburg Railroad.

October 27. – Five batteries – B. Fourts U. S. Artillery; B and H, First New York; E, Massachusetts, and Ninth Massachusetts – accompanied the infantry divisions of the corps to Hatcher’s Run. They were not engaged and returned the next day without having fired a shot.

[November.] – The command has occupied the same position as reported last return. The batteries have been engaged in building winter quarters and stables. They at present occupy the following forts and batteries: Battery E, Massachusetts Artillery, Batteries Numbers 24 and 25; Battery B, First Pennsylvania Artillery, Battery Numbers 26 and Fort Howard; Batteries G and D, Fifth U. S. Artillery, and Battery E, First New York Artillery, Fort Wadsworth; Battery L, First New York Artillery, Fort Keene; Battery D, First New York Artillery, Fort Urmston; Battery C, First New York Artillery, Fort Conahey; Battery B, First New York Artillery, Forts Clarke and Siebert; Battery B, Fourth U. S. Artillery, Fort Dushane; Battery H, First New York Artillery, and Ninth Massachusetts Battery, in reserve.

SIXTH ARMY CORPS.*

December 1. – First Division broke camp near Kernstown; marched to Stephenson’s Station and took cars for Washington; arrived there on the 2nd and at once embarked on transports for City Point.

December 4. – Arrived at City Point; proceeded in cars to Parke’s Station; from thence marched to the line of works and relieved the Third Division, Fifth Corps. Remained in camp until the 9th instant.

December 9. – The division moved out to Hatcher’s Run as a support to a reconnaissance made by General Miles, of the Second Corps.

December 10. – Returned to camp, where they still remain.

December 1 to 9. – Second Division remained near Kernstown; broke camp on the 9th and marched to Stephenson’s Station and took cars for Washington.

December 10. – Arrived in washington and embarked on transports for City Point.

December 16. – Arrived in front of Petersburg and encamped.

Third Division remained in camp near Kernstown until the 3rd.

December 3. – Broke camp and marched to Stephenson’s Station; took cars for Washington.

December 4. – Arrived in Washington and embarked on transports for City Point.

December 6. – Arrived at City Point; moved to the line of works and relieved part of the Fifth Corps.

December 9. – Made a reconnaissance to the Vaughan road.

December 10. – Returned to camp.

December 11 to 31. – Remained there.

First Brigade, First Division.

December 1. – The brigade broke camp near Winchester, Va., and marched to Stephenson’s Station; from thence by rail to Washington and boat to City Point.

December 4. – Arrived at City Point.

December 5. – Left City Point and arrived at its present camp near Petersburg.

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*Commanded by Major General Horatio G. Wright.

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Third Brigade, First Division.

December 1. – The brigade left its camp near Kernstown; proceeded by rail from Stephenson’s Depot to Washington.

December 2. – Took transports.

December 4. – Shortly after noon reached City Point, where the command was debarked and proceeded by rail to Parke’s Station.

December 5. – Relieved the troops of General Baxter’s brigade, Crawford’s division, Fifth Corps.

December 8[9]. – Moved out to Hatcher’s Run, supporting Miles’ division, of Second Corps.

December 9[10]. – Returned to old camps. In the evening ordered to the position occupied by some of the troops of General Potter’s division.

December 10[11]. – Returned to former position.

First Brigade, Second Division.

December 1. – In camp three miles south of Winchester, Va.

December 9. – Broke camp and marched to Stephenson’s Depot.

December 10. – Marched to within two miles south of Charlestown, Va.

December 11. – Marched to Jefferson, Md., via Harper’s Ferry.

December 12. – Marched to Monocacy Junction, Md.

December 13. – Took cars for Washington; arrived there at 9 p. m. same day.

December 14. – Embarked on steam-boats for City Point.

December 16. – Debarked; took cars for Patrick’s station on the military railroad; arrived there the same night.

December 31. – In camp near Patrick’s Station, Va.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

December 9. – Broke camp near Winchester at 5 a. m.; marched to Stephenson’s Depot and took cars for Washington.

December 10. – Embarked at 5 p. m. on transports for City Point.

December 12. – Marched for Patrick’s station, where we are now encamped.

Third Division.

December 3. – The division broke camp near Kernstown, Va., and marched to Stephenson’s Depot;took the cars for Washington.

December 4. – Arrived at Washington and took passage on transports.

December 5 and 6. – Arrived at City Point.

December 7. – Went into camp near Warren’s station, Va., occupying the lie of works previously held by the Fifth Army Corps.

December 9. – The division made a reconnaissance to the Vaughan road.

December 10. – The troops returned to camp.

December 11 to 30. – No events of importance transpired.

December 31. – A party of the enemy made an attack on the picket-line of the division about 5 a. m., killing 2 men and capturing 21 men of the Ninth New York Artillery. The division was promptly under arms. The enemy, however, retired in a few moments, and the picket-line resumed its usual position.

First Brigade, Third Division.

December 3. – This command left its works near Winchester, Va., and marched to Stephenson’s Depot, and there took cars for Washington, D. C.

December 4. – Arrived in Washington at 7 a. m. and embarked on transports, and at 1.30 p. m. left for City Point, Va.

December 5. – Reached City Point at 9.30 a. m. and marched to Parke’s Station, and occupied camp left by Fifth Corps, where it is still encamped.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

December 1 and 2. – The brigade was encamped near Kernstown, Va.

December 3. – Broke camp at 8 a. m. and marched with the division to Stephenson’s Depot, where the troops were shipped on cars.

December 4. – Arrived in Washington and embarked on transports.

December 5 and 6. – The command reached City Point and were conveyed to the front by cars.

December 7. – Took position near Weldon railroad, occupying a portion of the works previously held by the Fifth Corps.

December 9. – Made a reconnaissance with the division to the Vaughan road.

December 10. – Returned to camp.

December 31. – Enemy made a demonstration on the picket-line in front of this brigade at 6 a. m. After a brisk skirmish the enemy retired to their own line of works. Our loss in the affair was 2 killed and 21 captured.

NINTH ARMY CORPS.*

August 15. – In the evening the First, Second, and Third Divisions moved from their position in the trenches before Petersburg to the left and relieved the Fifth Corps.

August 19. – The First, Second, and Third Divisions moved toward the Weldon railroad to the support of the Fifth Corps, the First and Second Divisions engaging the enemy near Blick’s Station and driving him.

August 21[25]. – In the afternoon the Third Division moved to Reams’ Station to the support of the Second Corps, which was then engaged with the enemy, but returned during the night. The Fourth Division moved from before Petersburg and took up position on the right of the corps. Since the 21st [25th] the corps has been in position between the Weldon railroad and Jerusalem plank road engaged in throwing up entrenchments and constructing redoubts.

August 27. – The Fourth Division was relieved by the Third Division and placed in reserve.

September 1 to 25. – The First and Second Divisions lay near the Weldon railroad entrenched, connecting with the Second Corps on the right and the Fifth Corps on the left.

September 25. – The Second Division moved to the right, in rear of the Second Corps, as reserve. The First Division, being relieved by the Third Division, moved to the rear and encamped.

—————

*Commanded by Major General John G. Parke.

—————

September 30. – In the morning a movement was made to the left and west of Weldon railroad; the First and Second Divisions of the corps marched to left of Fifth Corps, and engaged the enemy at Pegram’s farm without decisive result. At night these troops were retired to line of works near Peebles’ house, captured by Fifth Corps in the early part of the day; the Third Division meanwhile remaining on the old line, holding it from Fort Davis to near Weldon railroad.

October 1. – The First and Second Divisions withdrew during the night of September 30 from Pegram’s house to the vicinity of the Peebles house and threw up temporary breast-works; Third Division moved from near Jones’ house to the Aiken house.

October 2. – Advanced as far as Pegram’s house with General Mott’s division, of the Second Corps, on the left.

October 5. – The Third Division moved from the Aiken house and took up a position extending from Fort Cummings to near Fort Dushane, relieving Mott’s division, Second Corps, which was then ordered to rejoin the second Corps. The First and Second Divisions took up a position, extending from Fort Fisher, on the right, to the Squirrel Level road, on the left.

Troops were engaged during the month in throwing up breast-works and constructing redoubts until the morning of the 27th, when the corps broke camp and moved to the left toward Boydton plank road, in conjunction with the Second and Fifth Corps. Found the enemy in force behind his works near the Clements house. Connection was made on the left of corps with the Fifth Corps, and temporary breast-works were thrown up; skirmished with the enemy until the 28th, when the corps resumed its former position.

[November.] – The First and Second Divisions of this corps remained in the position occupied on the 31st ultimo until the morning of the 29th instant, when, in pursuance of orders from headquarters Army of the Potomac, these two divisions moved to the extreme right of the army, relieving the Second Corps, the First Division occupying the right from the Appomattox to Norfolk railroad, and the Second Division from Norfolk railroad to Battery Numbers 24, connecting with the right of Fifth Corps at that point.

November 18. – Two regiments of colored troops (Twenty-ninth and Thirty-first) were ordered to report to General Graham, at Point of Rocks.

November 26. – The remainder of the Third Division (colored troops) were ordered to the Army of the James, pursuant to orders from army headquarters. The Two hundred and seventh and Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers reported to this corps.

November 28. – The Two hundred and fifth, Two hundred and eighth, and Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers reported in pursuance of orders from Headquarters Armies of the United States. The Pennsylvania regiments were formed into a Provisional Brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 241, paragraph VI, headquarters Ninth Army Corps.

November 30. – The Provisional Brigade moved from vicinity of Peebles’ house to rear of this corps, and are held in reserve.

[December.] – The troops of this corps remained in position occupied on November 30 until the 9th.

December 9. – The late Provisional Brigade and portions of the First and Second Divisions moved about twenty miles to the left, in support of troops of the Fifth and Second Corps, engaged in destroying Weldon railroad.

December 11. – Troops returned and resumed their respective positions.

December 15. – The late Provisional Brigade was organized into two brigades, and designated Third Division, as per paragraph V, Special Orders, Numbers 256, from headquarters Ninth Army Corps.

From the 15th to 31st nothing of importance occurred along the lines of this corps, and the troops remained in position occupied at date of last report.

First Division.

August 1. – In the trenches before Petersburg, Va., on the right of the Ninth army Corps.

August 6. – Brigadier-General Ledlie went north on a twenty days’ sick leave, Brigadier General Julius White, assigned to the command of the division, relieving him. Captain D. R. Boice, acting aide-de-camp, First Lieutenant G. M. Randall and First Lieutenant William H. Powell, aides-de-camp, relieved.

August 14. – Moved to the extreme left of the army, relieving Third Division, Fifth Army Corps. The troops placed on a picket-line of some two miles and a half in extent. Remained in this position until August 19.

August 18. – Severe cannonade of two hours’ duration, beginning about 2 a. m., causing some casualties. Seventeen officers and 126 men of the Twenty-first Massachusetts Volunteers went to Washington for muster out, their term of service having expired. Captain S. Hovey, jr., division inspector; Captain E. R. Lewis, acting ordnance officer, and Captain G. C. Parker, provost-marshal, all of whom belonged to the above regiment, relieved from duty at these headquarters. In consequence, Captain E. E. Howe, Twenty-first Massachusetts Volunteers, and Captain W. N. Meserve, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, detailed inn place of latter officers, respectively; Second Lieutenant Greene Smith, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, detailed as acting aide-de-camp.

August 19. – The division was relieved by brigade of the Third Division, Second Army Corps, and at 3 p. m. started for the Weldon railroad, under orders to report to Major-General Warren, commanding Fifth Army Corps. When within half a mile of his position heard heavy firing; moved on at the double-quick; formed line on the right of the Third Division, Ninth Army Corps; advanced, and after half an hour’s fighting drove the enemy from our front, leaving his killed, wounded, and many small-arms.

August 20. – Took up position more to the rear and entrenched. Remained in this position until the 25th, when we were relieved by the Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, and remained ready to march to the assistance of the Second Corps, engaged near Reams’ Station, Va., but received no orders to march.

August 27. – Went into position farther to the right, relieving part of the Fourth Division, Ninth Army Corps, where the troops now remain.

August 28. – Brigadier-General White went away on the days’ sick leave. Brigadier-General Hartranft assigned to the command of the division, bringing with him Lieutenant Watts, aide-de-camp.

August 30. – The Provisional Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery was ordered to report to the commanding officer Eighteenth Army Corps. The Twenty-seventh New York Battery transferred to the Artillery Brigade, Ninth Army Corps. The Second Maine and Fourteenth Massachusetts Batteries transferred to the Artillery Reserve.

September 1 to 25. – In line near the same position taken on August 27, connecting with the Second Corps at Fort Hays on the right, and with Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, on the left. Fortifications and several redoubts were thrown up, much slashing done, and two lines of abatis constructed. The line held by this division was about 2,200 yards long.

September 25. – Troops relieved in the line by Third Division (colored troops).

September 29. – Moved to the vicinity of the Gurley house and bivouacked for the night.

September 30. – Marched to vicinity of Peebles’ house, following Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, and took position in line of battle. Moved farther north to the Pegram house in the afternoon, and was engaged with the enemy near the latter place. Loss in killed, wounded, and missing 345. The Third Brigade assigned to this division from old First Division, Ninth Army Corps, September 1, 1864, by paragraph I, Special Orders, Numbers 160, Ninth Army Corps. Designation of the division changed from Third to First, September 13, 1864, by General Orders, Numbers 39, headquarters Ninth Army Corps.

October 1. – During the night of September 30 withdrew from the Pegram house to the vicinity of the Peebles house, where temporary breast-works were thrown up.

October 2. – The division advanced in line of battle northward, connecting with Potter’s (Second) division, Ninth Army Corps, on the right, and Mott’s division, Second Army Corps, on the left, as far as the Pegram house, the right resting in the field in front of the Pegram house and extending westward. Here we skirmished with the enemy until nearly sunset, when the left of the line was withdrawn, forming nearly a right angle with Potter’s division at the Pegram house, and extending to the old line of the enemy’s rifle-pits near the Peebles house. Here a strong line of works was thrown up and a large amount of slashing done.

October 8. – This division made a reconnaissance to the left, in the vicinity of the Smith house, Hawks house, and Walker house. From this date to the 26th we strengthened our line connecting with the Third Division (colored) on the left, built redoubts, constructed abatis, and continued slashing of timber in our front.

October 27. – This division moved out to the left on a reconnaissance to beyond the Clements house, when we came up to the enemy’s works. Here we halted, formed connection with Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, on the right, and Fifth Corps, on the left; threw up temporary breast-works, and remained skirmishing with the enemy until the 28th, when we withdrew to our old position, where we are now encamped. The loss in killed and wounded on the 27th and 28th was 64.

November 1 to 29. – The division occupied the line on the left of the army between the Pegram house and the Cummings house.

November 29. – In accordance with orders from headquarters army of the Potomac, the division, being relieved by Miles’ division, Second Corps, moved to the extreme right of the army, and in the evening relieved the Second Division, second Corps, on the line. No other events of importance occurred during the month.

December 9. – In obedience to orders the Third Maryland, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin, One hundred and ninth New York, and Sixtieth Ohio were temporarily detached from the division, forming a Provisional Brigade, under command of Bvt. Colonel G. P. Robinson, Third Maryland, with orders to report to Brigadier General Robert B. Potter, remaining absent from the division five days.

First Brigade, First Division.

[September.] – The regiments of this brigade occupied the line they had been holding to the left of Fort Hays until the 25th, when they were relieved by the Third Division. The Fifty-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers and Seventy-ninth New York Volunteers were left as a garrison to Fort Hays. Until the 25th the command was constantly engaged in completing the line of works occupied, constructing abatis, felling timber, building corduroy roads, laboring on fortifications on other lines, and performing picket and trench guard duty.

September 29. – Moved to the Gurley house.

September 30. – Engaged the enemy near the Pegram house, with a los of 2 men killed, 50 wounded, and 30 missing.

General Orders, Numbers 39, from headquarters Ninth Army Corps, dated September 13, 1864, changed the designation of the Third Division, Brigadier General O. B. Willcox commanding, to the First Division.

October 1. – The command was engaged in throwing up earth-works near the Peebles house.

October 2. – Moved to near the position occupied on the 30th. Toward night took up a new position near the Pegram house and threw up entrenchments.

October 8. – A part of the brigade was engaged with the remainder of the division in a reconnaissance.

October 27. – The whole command, with the exception of the Eighth Michigan and a detachment of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, left to garrison forts, moved out toward the Boydton plank road and advanced to the rebel fortifications protecting the South Side Railroad. There was continued skirmishing with the enemy, with a total loss of 28 wounded.

October 28. – Withdrew in the afternoon, having attempted an assault upon the enemy’s works. The brigade returned to its old camp, where it now lies. The several regiments have been engaged in building entrenchments, felling timber, constructing abatis, and on picket, camp, and trench guard duty.

[November.] – The brigade occupied the trenches near the Peebles house, Va., until the 29th. During this time it was engaged in drill, perfecting the line of works, constructing abatis, and picket duty.

[November.] – The brigade occupied the trenches near the Peebles house, Va., until the 29th. During this time it was engaged in drill, perfecting the line of works, constructing abatis, and picket duty.

November 29. – The brigade moved down to opposite Petersburg, Va., relieving Colonel McAllister’s brigade, of the Second Corps, the left extending to the Norfolk railroad and the right to Battery B.

The Thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was transferred to the Second Brigade November 11, 1864.

[December.] – The regiments of this brigade have laid in the trenches in front of Petersburg during the month. The Thirty-seventy Wisconsin and One hundred and ninth New York Volunteers were temporarily detached on the 9th, and placed in the Provisional Brigade and moved to the left, in support of General Warren.

December 14. – They returned to brigade. The troops have been engaged in picket and trench guard duty, in repairing picket-lines and covered ways.

Second Brigade, First Division.

August 1 to 15. – In division line before Petersburg, Va., entrenching, picketing, and sharpshooting.

August 15. – Moved to the Fifth Corps redoubts and picketed the line of the Jerusalem plank road.

August 19. – Moved toward Weldon railroad; went into action near Yellow House.

August 21. – Again in action near Yellow House.

August 25. – Moved short distance to the left to support Hancock.

August 27. – Moved to the right and relieved Fourth Division.

September 1. – Occupied part of the line near the Aiken house, between the Jerusalem plank road and Weldon railroad; were engaged chiefly in fortifying and building corduroy roads.

September 7. – Moved camp to the Williams house, on the plank road, on our rear line of defenses, and continued the work already begun.

September 20. – Relieved the cavalry pickets in our front by details from our brigade; picketed on our front until the 26th, when the cavalry again occupied the line. Have been employed all the time since moving to this camp in work on the fortifications.

September 29. – Received orders about 1 a. m. to have brigade in line at 4 o’clock, ready to march; lay in line all day, and in the evening went into camp near the Gurley house, about one mile and a half from our former camp.

September 30. – Colonel Humphrey was relieved from command and mustered out of service, and Brigadier General J. F. Hartranft assigned to command. Moved about 9.10 a. m., following Second Division; moved slowly toward Poplar Spring Church; reached the Peebles house, near the works of the enemy just captured by the Fifth Corps, and formed in line of battle about 1 p. m. Brigade was moved from one position to another during the afternoon, and finally was engaged with the enemy near the Pegram house just before dark. Occupied the extreme left, and the line of troops on our right being forced back, we were compelled to retire, the enemy on both flanks and rapidly coming in our rear. Moved back a short distance and reformed, holding the line near the Pegram house. Established a picket-line, and about 12 midnight withdrew to the left of a newly established line and fortified. Left the Twenty-fourth New York (dismounted) Cavalry on picket where the line was first established. The loss of the brigade during the day was 1 commissioned officer and 5 enlisted men killed, 3 commissioned officers and 45 enlisted men wounded, 8 commissioned officers and 150 enlisted men missing; aggregate, 212. This number includes several captured early next morning from the picket-line, who were reported in the list of casualties for September 30, 1864.

October 1. – Were engaged in fortifying all day. Soon after daylight the Twenty-fourth New York Cavalry, on picket near the Pegram house, was driven in and a few men captured.

October 2. – The brigade advanced again to the Boisseau house in connection with the rest of the corps and the Fifth and one division of the Second Corps. After some skirmishing with the enemy a new line was established, extending to the Pegram house. This brigade held the left of the line connecting with the old works of the enemy; remained here fortifying until the 8th.

October 8. – Joined the Third Brigade in reconnaissance west on the Squirrel Level road; advanced about one mile and a half, meeting a strong line of the enemy’s skirmishers; returned to camp at dusk.

October 9. – General Hartranft was relieved, and Lieutenant-Colonel Newberry, Twenty-fourth New York Cavalry, assumed command.

October 16. – Lieutenant-Colonel Newberry received leave of absence, and the command devolved upon Lieutenant Colonel B. M. Cutcheon, Twentieth Michigan.

October 18. – The Twenty-fourth New York moved to City Point to be mounted.

October 27. – Broke camp at 3 a. m. and moved with the army in its advance to the Boydton plank road. The Forty-sixth New York was left to garrison Fort Cummings. The brigade had the advance of the Ninth Corps, and moved forward on the Squirrel Level road. The enemy’s pickets and skirmishers fell back to their works, and were followed to within a short distance of their main line. Erected temporary breastworks here.

October 28. – Remained until 11.30 a. m., skirmishing with the enemy, when orders were received to retire. Returned to the old camp, having lost 2 officers and 23 enlisted men wounded, and 1 officer and 4 enlisted men missing.

[November.] – The brigade participated in no movement of importance during the month. Remained in camp at Peebles’ farm until November 29, when it moved with the division to the extreme right of the line, relieving a brigade of the Second Corps.

[December.] – The brigade has not changed camp or engaged in any movement during the month.

December 13. – The Thirteenth Ohio Cavalry (dismounted) was detached from the command and ordered to City Point for the purpose of being mounted.

Third Brigade, First Division.

September 1 to 28. – Occupying various positions on the line from the Jerusalem plank road to the left.

September 29 [30]. – Marched across Vaughan road to the front, near the Pegram house. Went into action. At night retired near Peebles’ house and constructed breast-works.

October 1. – Built works near Peebles’ house, on Squirrel Level road.

October 2. – Advanced and engaged the enemy.

October 3 to 8. – Erected redoubts; slashed timber.

October 8. – Reconnoitered to the left near rebel Fort McRae, on Duncan road, and as far as beyond Hawks’ house.

October 27 and 28. – Reconnoitered toward Boydton plank road, returning to old position the latter day.

No severe engagement during the month.

First Lieuts. J. S. Stocking and J. L. Johnson, One hundredth Pennsylvania, wounded October 27.

November 29. – Moved from Pegram’s farm to camp in front of Petersburg, Va. No casualties during the month.

Second Division.

[August.] -Held line before Petersburg up to night of 14th.

August 15. – In the morning moved into position about one mile to the left, relieving Griffin’s division, of Fifth Corps.

August 19. – Relieved by Mott’s division, of Second Corps, and moved to re-enforce Fifth Corps, on Weldon railroad, at Blick’s Station; got up late in the afternoon during attack of enemy on Warren; sent in skirmish line on right of First Division, but did not participate in general engagement; entrenched position east of Weldon railroad, where the division lies at date of this report [August 31].

September 1 to 25. – The division lay near the Weldon railroad, one brigade holding line, the other in reserve.

September 25. – Moved to right; the whole division in reserve in rear of line held by Second Corps.

September 28. – Returned to near Weldon railroad; held in reserve.

September 30. – Moved out of entrenchments to westward with Fifth Corps in advance; Fifth Corps carried entrenched line near Peebles’ house. Division was went in and advanced beyond Pegram’s house toward Boydton plank road, driving enemy’s skirmishers. In advancing against enemy’s works was met by a countercharge and driven back to Pegram’s house in some confusion, losing severely in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Checked the enemy at Pegram’s house, and afterward retired to works carried in the morning.

[October.] – The Second Division occupied the line of works near the Peebles house until the morning of the 27th.

October 27. – Moved about one mile and a half to left, going into position near the Hawks house, connecting on the left with the Third Division, and on the right with pickets of the garrison holding the forts.

October 28. – Remained in line, when, after covering the retirement of the corps, it withdrew, and returned about 3 p. m. to the old position, which it now occupies.

[November.] – The division remained in position holding the line of works near Pegram’s house, Va., until the 29th instant, when, upon being relieved by troops of the Second Corps, it moved some four miles to the right, filling line vacated by the Third Division, Second Corps, where it has since been is position.

[December.] – The position of this division remains unchanged since last monthly return, holding the line of works before Petersburg, with right resting on Fort Meikel, and left occupying Battery Numbers 24.

December 10. – A part of the division, in connection with detachments from the corps, moving some twenty miles to the left, forming support for the Second and Fifth Corps, then engaged in destroying the Weldon railroad.

December 11. – Returned to old camps, which they now occupy.

First Brigade, Second Division.

[October.] – Engaged in siege operations before Petersburg, Va.

[November.] – Engaged in siege operation before Petersburg, Va.

[December.] – Engaged in siege operation before Petersburg, Va.

Third Division.

[August.] – The position of the troops of this division remained the same as on the 30th ultimo, one brigade relieving the other on the line.

August 19. – In the morning the division marched to Blick’s Six-Mile House, on the Weldon railroad, and when the enemy attacked the Fifth Corps in the afternoon it was moved forward. The First Brigade (Hartranft’s) successfully repulsed the first two attacks of the enemy, and the Second Brigade (Humphrey’s) gained possession of the line of works from which the troops of the Fifth Corps had retired. The whole division remained in the front line until the afternoon of the 20th, when it was withdrawn.

August 21. – In the morning the First Brigade took up a position and threw up a line of works in front of Blick’s house, crossing the railroad. The enemy attacked in the morning at 10.30, but was repulsed. In the afternoon the division was moved to the right and entrenched.

August 25. – Marched to Reams’ Station to support Second Corps, which was engaged; arrived there about dark, and withdrew to our old position during the night.

August 27. – Moved to right, relieving Fourth Division, and took position on the line fronting Petersburg; threw up new line of works.

August 31. – Division still on the line taken up on the 27th.

September 13. – The number of this division was changed from Fourth to Third by Special Orders, Numbers 39, headquarters Ninth Army Corps.

September 26. – The division moved and occupied the line of entrenchments from Fort Davis to Fort Howard.

September 30. – The division stretched out and occupied the line reaching from the Weldon railroad to Fort Davis, which position it now occupies.

October 1. – Moved from near Jones’ house to the Aiken house.

October 5. – The division moved from near the Aiken house to the Peebles house beyond Poplar Spring Church, occupying a position extending from Fort Cummings to near Fort Dushane.

October 27 and 28. – The division took part in the reconnaissance to Hatcher’s Run, losing in killed, wounded, and missing, and aggregate of 80.

October 28. – Returned to the position occupied previous to the reconnaissance.

[November.] – The troops composing this command joined the Ninth Army Corps from the Army of the James about November 28 at Poplar Grove Church, and were formed into a Provisional Brigade, under command of Brigadier General J. F. Hartranft.

November 30. – The brigade was moved to the right of the line of the army, and was encamped in support of the Ninth Army Corps line from the Appomattox to Fort Alexander Hays.

December 9. – The brigade was massed near Fort Stevenson, on the Jerusalem plank road, for movement; remained in this position until the evening of the 10th, when the brigade marched out on the Jerusalem plank road, with other troops of the Ninth Army Corps, as far as the Nottoway.

December 11. – Arrived there at 4 a. m. Here we halted until the return of the expedition toward Weldon under Major-General Warren, when the troops marched back to their respective camps.

December 13. – Arrived at camp about 2 a. m. At 7 a. m. the brigade was again massed on the Jerusalem plank road, and remained there until the night of the 14th, when it returned to camp.

December 15. – The Provisional Brigade was organized into two brigades and designated the Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, by paragraph V, Special Orders, Numbers 256, headquarters Ninth Army Corps.

First Brigade, Third Division.

[August.] – Part of the time this brigade lay in the trenches in their old position in front of Petersburg; a part of the time in reserve engaged in fatigue duty.

August 19. – Moved out to the support of General Warren, on the Weldon railroad. In the afternoon engaged with the enemy, in which the command suffered a loss of 16 killed, 82 wounded, and 5 missing.

August 21. – The brigade building a line across the railroad. The enemy made an assault and were repulsed with great loss; we suffered a loss of 6 killed, 16 wounded, and 62 missing; since which time the whole command has been constantly engaged in building works, roads, on picket, and in the trenches.

October 3. – The brigade was removed from its position in line near the Aiken house and took up a position in the refused portion of the line, then just established, near Poplar Grove Church. The troops have been engaged most of the month in fortifying this and adjacent positions.

October 27 and 28. – The command took part in the reconnaissance in force near Hatcher’s Run, losing during the operations an aggregate of 76 killed, wounded, and missing.

December 9. – The regiments that now compose this command, formerly known as part of the Provisional Brigade, Ninth Army Corps, left camp in the evening and bivouacked near Fort Stevenson that night.

December 10. – In the evening marched out on the Jerusalem plank road as far as Nottoway River. Remained there until General Warren’s command recrossed the Nottoway, then marched back to their respective camps. The movement was to support General Warren’s command while he was making a demonstration on the South Side and Weldon railroads.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

August 1. .- Occupied the trenches before Petersburg, Va., on the same ground which we occupied on July 31. Remained here until the 6th, when we were relieved by the First Brigade; moved to the rear and encamped in the field.

August 14. – Again moved to the front and relieved the First Brigade.

August 19. – At 4 a. m., having been relieved by troops from the Eighteenth Corps, marched with the division to re-enforce General Warren at the Yellow House, on the Weldon railroad. Arrived about 9 a. m., and participated in the engagement on that day. Loss in the brigade: 11 enlisted men killed, 1 commissioned officer and 37 enlisted men wounded, and 3 enlisted men missing; aggregate, 52.

August 21. – Were in reserve during the engagement on the Weldon road, excepting the Sixtieth Ohio Infantry, which was on picket. The loss in the brigade was 1 enlisted man killed, 1 commissioned officer and 4 enlisted men wounded, 1 commissioned officer and 60 enlisted men missing; aggregate, 67.

August 25. – Marched at 3 p. m. to re-enforce General Hancock at Reams’ station; did not arrive until after dark, when the fighting had ceased. Marched back the same night to the Williams house, and early next morning went into camp near the Gurley house.

August 27. – Relieved a portion of the Fourth Division on the line between the railroad and Jerusalem plank road, which we still occupy.

[September.] – This brigade was in position near Gurley’s house, on the extreme left of the line; entrenched and built forts at different points along the left of the line.

September 25. – Moved from near Gurley’s house, and reoccupied position between Forts Hays and Davis, the picket-line in close proximity with that of the enemy, with continual firing.

October 5. – This brigade moved from the position between Forts Davis and Alexander Hays, on the left of the Jerusalem plank road, and took position near Poplar Grove Church, Va.

October 27. – Moved out by daylight by Fort Cummings and occupied a line between the First and Second Divisions, Ninth Army Corps.

October 29. – We returned to the old encampment near Poplar Grove Church, with a loss of but 5 men wounded.

[December.] – The Second Brigade was organized December 15, 1864, by command of Brigadier-General Hartranft. Colonel J. A. Mathews, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was assigned to its command same date. Brigade composed of Two hundred and fifth, Two hundred and seventh, and Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. No movement of any importance has occurred since its organization.

Fourth Division.

[August.] – The division occupied the trenches on the left of the Ninth Corps line until the 19th instant.

August 21. – Moved toward the Weldon railroad and took up a position on the right of the Ninth Corps, connecting with Mott’s division, of the Second Corps. Remained until the 27th, when the division was withdrawn from the front and placed in reserve by the Gurley house, where it is now encamped.

Second Brigade, Fourth Division.

[August.] – This brigade was in the trenches on the left of the Ninth Army Corps until the 6th, when we moved to the rear.

August 9. – Moved into the trenches again, where we remained until the 19th. Colonel McAllister’s brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps, then relieved us. We moved to the rear and remained for the night.

August 20. – Moved into the former encampment of the Regular Brigade, Fifth Army Corps.

August 21. – Moved at 10 a. m. to the left, and occupied about a mile of the line, and commenced throwing up earth-works in front of the Aiken house, where we remained until the 27th, when the brigade moved to the Gurley house, in rear of Fifth Army Corps, where it lies [August 31] in the lines facing south.

Second Division, Cavalry Corps.

August 1. – General Gregg in command of corps; Colonel Gregg commanding division; Colonel William Stedman, Sixth Ohio, commanding First Brigade; Brigadier-General Davies received twenty days’ leave; Colonel M. Kerwin, Thirteenth Pennsylvania, commanding Second Brigade; brigades picketing left and rear of army.

August 2 and 3. – Quiet; headquarters near Prince George Court-House.

August 4. – Moved to Jerusalem plank road.

August 5. – Occupy line left by Third Division; right on infantry and left on General Kautz.

August 6. – Moved headquarters to Birchett’s, on Fort Powhatan road.

August 7. – Quiet.

August 8. – Moved headquarters; General Gregg resumed command of division.

August 9. – Broke camp and moved to near Prince George Court-House.

August 10. – Quiet.

August 11. – Second Brigade relieved on picket by First Brigade.

August 12. – Orders to move; General Kautz relieves division on left of the infantry.

August 13. – Division marched to Appomattox, and crossed at Point of Rocks, marching all night toward James River.

August 14. – Crossed to north side about 2 a. m., and moved out on the right of Second Corps on New Market road; skirmished with the enemy at Gravel Hill; drove him back and occupied Charles City road; Second Brigade had a severe skirmish with the enemy near Deep Creek, and drove them away, occupying their barricades; command bivouacked on Charles City road.

August 15. – A portion of the First Brigade skirmished with the enemy at intersection of Charles City and Quaker City roads.

August 16. – The command moved out at 4 a. m.; First Brigade left in position near New Market road; Second Brigade moved out and attacked the enemy on Deep Creek and drove him from his works, and, in conjunction with General Miles, made a reconnaissance to near White’s Tavern, driving the enemy to that point; in a charge by the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry the rebel General Chambliss was killed; reconnaissance successful; found the enemy in force; fight ensued in covering the rear of the infantry; returned to Deep Creek, fighting. The brigade of infantry under General Miles was relieved and returned to command; fought at Deep Creek; were driven across and took position on the right of infantry, and barricaded the various roads and placed dismounted men behind them.

August 17. – Picketing on right of infantry on Deep Creek and Charles City road; First Brigade at intersection of Charles City and White Oak Swamp roads. The enemy made an attack and were driven back. They attacked the First Brigade, which was driven back; retook the ground and re-established line; General Gregg authorized to communicate with General W. H. F. Lee about the burial of rebel General Chambliss.

August 18. – Quiet; picketing on right of infantry.

August 19. – Quiet; First Brigade ordered to report to General Meade on the south side of the river.

August 20. – Colonel Smith, First Maine, returned from sick leave and took command of the Second Brigade; enemy in front on Deep Creek. At 9 p. m. headquarters and Second Brigade moved to James River, leaving out pickets; marched all night. Reached camp near Prince George Court-House at daylight on the 21st and marched to Jerusalem plank road; thence to Weldon railroad, on the left of the Fifth Corps; roads very heavy; joined by First Brigade.

August 22. – Made a reconnaissance to Reams’ Station; covered left and front of infantry, who were destroying the railroad.

August 23. – Leaving a regiment on Wyatt road and one on Dinwiddie Court-House road, the remainder of the division took position at Reams’ Station; enemy reported advancing; division moved out, met and whipped him.

August 24. – Quiet; protecting infantry, who were at work destroying railroad.

August 25. – First Brigade took position at junction of Dinwiddie and Reams’ Station roads; Second Brigade picketing and in reserve on left of infantry, who formed in line of battle. The vedettes and pickets were driven in and the enemy (Hill’s corps of infantry and Hampton’s division of cavalry) advanced in line of battle; second Brigade was dismounted and placed behind works on left of infantry; the infantry were driven; cavalry was ordered to the rear and mounted and covered rear of infantry; formed picket-line on left of infantry from near Wood’s Shop and to Jerusalem plank road.

August 26. – Occupied old line on left of infantry, commencing at Weldon railroad and ending at the river.

August 27. – Line maintained; enemy’s cavalry picketing in front; General Gregg authorized to ask permission to bury our dead at Reams’ Station; not acceded to; General Hampton replies, “The dead will be buried and the wounded properly cared for.”

August 28. – The command between Gurley’s house and Jerusalem plank road.

August 29. – Quiet.

August 30. – Position unchanged; Second Brigade inspected by special inspector of cavalry.

August 31. – Quiet; division received re-enforcements; division headquarters near Williams’ house, on plank road. First Brigade, Colonel William Stedman commanding; Second Brigade, Colonel Smith commanding; all in vicinity of Jerusalem plank road; general court-martial in session.

September 1. – Quiet; division encamped in the vicinity of Williams’ house, on Jerusalem plank road. General Gregg in command of division; Colonel William Stedman, Sixth Ohio, in command of First Brigade; Colonel C. H. Smith, First Maine, in command of Second Brigade.

September 2. – Reconnaissance made beyond Yellow tavern, on Weldon railroad, successful; returned in the evening.

September 3 to 9. – Eight companies of First District of Columbia Cavalry transferred from Kautz’s division to the First Maine Regiment, of this division, by Special Orders, Numbers 283, Adjutant-General’s Office, War Department, September 8, 1864.

September 10 to 13. – General Davies returned from sick leave: in command of First Brigade.

September 14. – Quiet.

September 15. – General Gregg on leave; General Davies in command of division during his absence.

September 16. – Rebel cavalry made a dash in our rear and captured a herd of cattle (2,500); division moved out to intercept them, and endeavored to recapture the cattle, but found the enemy strongly posted and in much superior numbers.

September 17. – Returned to camp.

September 19 to 24. – Quiet; nothing unusual occurring.

September 25. – General Gregg returned from leave and resumed command of division.

September 26. – First Brigade arrived at Prince George Court-House to extend picket-line.

September 27. – Quiet.

September 28. – Quiet; received orders to be ready to move out at 4 a. m.

September 29. – Moved out on Wyatt road across the Weldon railroad to its intersection with Vaughan road; met the enemy’s cavalry in force and drove them.

September 30. – First Brigade made a reconnaissance to Armstrong’s house, on telegraph road; engaged and drove back Dunovant’s brigade of rebel cavalry, capturing among others his assistant adjutant-general.

October 1. – General Gregg in command of division; General Davies in command of First Brigade; Colonel C. H. Smith, First maine, commanding Second Brigade; division on Vaughan road. The First Brigade attacked by four brigades of rebel cavalry, which were gallantly repulsed; skirmishing kept up until dark.

October 2 and 3. – Quiet.

October 4. – The command returned to its old camp on Jerusalem plank road and re-established picket-line.

October 5 to 10. – Quiet; in camp. The Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry reported for duty and assigned temporarily to Second Brigade.

October 11 to 18. – A third brigade, organized by authority of major-general commanding Army of the Potomac, composed of the Twenty-first Pennsylvania and First Maine Cavalry, transferred from the First to the Third Brigade; Colonel C. H. Smith in command of the Third Brigade.

October 25. – Quiet.

October 26. – At 3 p. m. command moved out and concentrated in the vicinity of Perkins’ house and bivouacked.

October 27. – At 4 a. m. moved out on left of Second Army Corps on Quaker road; skirmished with the rebel cavalry and drove them back and joined the Second Army Corps, which was engaged with the enemy on Boydton plank road, at Hatcher’s Creek; division attacked in rear by the rebel cavalry in force. Our line held its ground. The enemy retired after darkness set in.

October 28. – Returned to old camp on Jerusalem plank road and re-established picket-line.

October 29 to 31. – Quiet;; nothing unusual occurred.

November 1. – General Gregg in command of division; Colonel M. Kerwin, Thirteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, commanding Second Brigade; Colonel C. H. Smith, First Maine Cavalry, commanding Third Brigade.

November 2 to 6. – Quiet.

November 7. – Division moved out at 8 a. m. on reconnaissance toward Stony Creek.

November 8 and 9. – Quiet.

November 10. – Quiet; Colonel J. I. Gregg, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, returned from absence on account of wounds received in action, and assumed command of Second Brigade.

November 11 to 20. – Quiet; scouting parties sent out almost daily.

November 21 to 30. – Quiet; nothing unusual occurred; pickets harassed very much by guerrillas and bushwhackers.

December 1. – At 4 a. m. the division moved out toward Stony Creek station via Lee’s Mill and Jerusalem plank road, and after the destruction of the station and a portion of the railroad the command started on return march, First Brigade in rear. The enemy’s cavalry made several attacks on the rear guard (First New Jersey), which were gallantly repulsed. Arrived in camp same night about 11 p. m.

December 2 to 6. – Quiet.

December 7. – At 4 a. m. the division, with the exception of two regiments, left to guard camp and picket, marched out on Jerusalem plank road in advance of the Fifth corps and bivouacked near Sussex Court-House.

December 8. – About daybreak the command resumed the march toward Jarratt’s Station, Weldon railroad, and bivouacked at that point.

December 9. – At 4 a. m., taking the Belfield road, the division marched to Three Creeks, First Brigade in advance, and found the enemy posted on the south bank of that stream, with two field pieces in position, with which they opined fire on our column. The Tenth New York Cavalry (First Brigade) was dismounted, crossed, and drove the enemy from their position, when the First New Jersey (First Brigade) crossed, mounted, and forced them to fall back on their works in front

of Belfield, from which they opened a heavy fire on our column. Skirmishing was kept up at this point until dark, when the command bivouacked.

December 10. – At 4 a. m. the command recrossed Three Creeks on the return march, the enemy harassing the rear.

December 11. – The division moved back in camp.

December 13 to 21. – General Gregg received leave of absence; General Davies commanding division.

December 22 to 31. – Quiet; command picketing left and rear from Jerusalem plank road to James River.

First Brigade, Second Division.

[August.] – The brigade was engaged in picket duty from the commencement of the month up to the 13th, when it moved across the James River in conjunction with the rest of the division, taking position on the left of the Second Corps; engaged the enemy near Malvern Hill, driving his cavalry from their breast-works, with but slight loss to the command; remained in position before the enemy for three days, being engaged each day. The division being relieved by the Tenth Corps, it (the First Brigade) recrossed the river and marched to the left wing of the army again, arriving and at once taking position on the left of the Fifth Corps, on the Weldon railroad.

August 20. – A heavy engagement ensued for the possession of the railroad held by us, but all the efforts of the enemy proved fruitless and he was driven back, with a heavy loss. The brigade was then engaged in working and protecting working parties in tearing up the railroad and rendering it perfectly useless for a considerable distance toward Reams’ Station.

August 25. – Advancing beyond the station, on the Darbytown road, met the enemy in force and drove him until obliged to fall back by the breaking of the line of a portion of the Second Corps, on the right; engaged in picket duty at the end of the month.

[September.] – The brigade was picketing around the left of the army at the beginning of this month, and continued doing that duty without a change of headquarters until the 15th [16th], when the command moved down the Jerusalem plank road after a raiding party of the enemy that had been capturing our cattle; had quite a sharp fight toward night, but were obliged to withdraw on account of the superiority of numbers of the enemy; again settled down in the old camp and did picket duty until September 26, when this brigade moved to Prince George Court-House to extend our picket-lines; remained there one day, when the brigade again moved across the Weldon railroad and up the Wyatt road as far as the intersection of it with the Vaughan road; there met the enemy and drove him.

September 30. – Secured the Vaughan road in the morning, and the night of the same day made a reconnaissance to Armstrong’s house, on the telegraph road, and there headed and turned Dunovant’s brigade of rebel cavalry, capturing his assistant adjutant-general. The brigade returned to its division about 2 a. m. of October 1.

October 1. – The brigade was lying on the Vaughan road, having been there about forty-eight hours, and skirmished almost continually. About 10 a. m. commenced skirmishing heavily with the enemy, and continued so until about 3 p. m., when four brigades of the enemy’s cavalry charged upon the brigade, and were gallantly repulsed. The

fighting continued until dark, and several other charges were made by the enemy, all of which were repulsed with heavy loss, while the loss of the brigade was slight.

October 2. – Established a picket-line beyond the field of the day before.

October 4. – The command moved back to its old camp on the Jerusalem plank road, and re-established the picket-lines previously held by this division, from the plank road to the James River. Continued doing picket duty until the 26th, when the brigade moved to the Weldon railroad; encamped for the night.

October 27. – Covered the rear of the division until arriving at the intersection of the Vaughan road with the military road, when at attack was made on our column by the enemy, but was easily repulsed by the First Pennsylvania and Tenth New York Cavalry. The brigade then followed on after the division, the First Pennsylvania Cavalry covering the rear and skirmishing with the enemy; crossed Gravelly Run and encamped near the Boydton plank road, and formed a picket-line covering the rear and left flank of the division.

October 28. – The command withdrew from its advanced position, this brigade covering the rear, and returned to its former camp without any event of importance, and resumed its old picket-line.

October 29. – The brigade broke camp near the Jerusalem plank road, and moved to the Norfolk railroad, about five miles from Petersburg, where it is at present [October 31] encamped.

November 1. – The brigade was encamped near McCann’s Station, on the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad.

November 7. – In connection with the division a reconnaissance was made down the Jerusalem plank road in the direction of Stony Creek, driving in the enemy’s pickets, capturing a few; the command returned to camp the same night, without loss.

November 17. – The brigade moved camp from McCann’s Station, about a quarter of a mile to the Westbrook house, where it is now encamped. The brigade has been engaged during the month in picket and scouting duty.

December 1. – The brigade broke camp and took up its line of march in rear of the Second Brigade, and moved toward Stony Creek Station via Lee’s Mill and Jerusalem plank road. The brigade arrived and massed at Duval’s Station, on the Weldon railroad. About 12 m., after the destruction of Stony Creek Station by the Second Brigade, the column commenced to fall back, this brigade taking the rear. The Tenth New York Cavalry skirmished with the enemy and then retired through the lines of the First New Jersey Cavalry, which covered the rear of the brigade, held in check and repulsed several charges of the enemy, while the remainder of the brigade recrossed the Nottoway River. The brigade then returned to camp without any further molestation of the enemy.

December 7. – The brigade again broke camp and massed with the other brigades of the division and a column of infantry under Major-General Warren, on the Jerusalem plank road, and marched in rear of the Second Brigade to Sussex Court-House, where it bivouacked for the night. At an early hour this morning the march was resumed, with this brigade in the advance and the First New Jersey Cavalry as the advance guard. The command arrived and encamped at Jarratt’s Station, on the Weldon railroad, about dark. At 4 a. m. the next day the column marched, taking the Belfield road, this brigade in the advance and the Tenth New York Cavalry in the extreme advance.

At Three Creeks the enemy were found posted on the southwest bank with two small pieces of artillery. The Tenth New York Cavalry were dismounted and directed to cross the stream and drive them from their position, which they did. The First New Jersey Cavalry were then sent across mounted to relieve the Tenth New York. This regiment, after relieving the Tenth New York, made a mounted charge and drove the enemy into their works in front of Belfield, from which they operated upon our column with artillery, the number of pieces being variously estimated from nine to fourteen. The First New Jersey, having been dismounted, were soon hotly engaged with the enemy. The First Pennsylvania and Twenty-fourth New York Cavalry were dismounted and sent in on the right, where they did excellent service. The First Massachusetts and Tenth New York Cavalry were dismounted and brought up to act as reserve. The brigade held its position until after dark, when it was ordered to retire and bivouac for the night, leaving one regiment, the Twenty-fourth New York Cavalry, to picket the front. At daylight the column retired across Three Creeks stream, the First brigade covering our rear. On our return the enemy were encountered at Jarratt’s Station, but were quickly driven away by the Tenth New York Cavalry. The next day the command retired to its camp near the Westbrook house, and continued doing picket and scouting duty the balance of the month.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

FIRST MAINE CAVALRY.

The work performed by the regiment during the month of August has consisted chiefly in picketing on the left and in rear of the army; the expedition across the James River in co-operation with the Second and Tenth Corps, and in scouting and picketing the roads from the left of the Fifth corps to below Reams’ Station, while the Second Corps was destroying the railroad. The regiment has done no very heavy marching, but its work has been constant and very wearing to men and horses. The regiment has been on picket ten days during the month, supporting a line from three to five miles in length. It has marched six days and been in camp fifteen. Much of the time spent in camp has been in close proximity [to the enemy],

requiring the horses to be saddled and allowing but little rest to the officers and men. It has been actively engaged six times during the month, involving a loss to the regiment of 49 men killed and wounded, and 1 missing, and 21 horses killed, 44 wounded, and 10 lost. The following are the most important movements in which the regiment has been engaged during the month:

August 13. – Broke camp near Prince George Court-House at 4 p. m., with four days’ rations and two days’ forage; marched all night, crossing the Appomattox at Point of Rocks and the James river near Deep Bottom.

August 14. – Took position on the right of the infantry, and were employed during the day in scouting the country between New Market and Charles City roads. A small reconnoitering party advanced within half a mile of White’s Tavern. The regiment had a slight skirmish on the Charles City road this afternoon; captured 1 officer and 5 men.

August 16. – Regiment moved out on Charles City road with the brigade; was slightly engaged with the enemy in the advance to White’s Tavern; brought up the rear in falling back; suffered severely in men and horses.

August 18. – Regiment went on picket as support to Second Pennsylvania Cavalry; picket-line was attacked at 5 p. m. before it was fairly established and was drawn in; lost a few men and horses killed and wounded.

August 20. – At 6 p. m. regiment withdrew from picket and crossed the James and Appomattox Rivers; marched all night to near Prince George Court-House; halted a few hours and resumed the march to the Temple house on the Jerusalem plank road. At 10 p. m. marched to Gurley’s house, one mile from Weldon railroad.

August 22. – Took the advance of brigade down the railroad; had a slight skirmish with the enemy on the Dinwiddie Court-House road; moved to Reams’ Station, and in the afternoon were heavily engaged with the enemy on mile west of Reams’ Station.

August 25. – Regiment engaged in battle at Reams’ Station; loss slight; retired from Reams’ Station during the night to Jerusalem plank road.

August 26. – Went on picket on plank road.

August 29. – Went into camp.

September 1. – In camp near Jerusalem plank road.

September 2. – Went on a reconnaissance, passing through the infantry lines at Yellow Tavern, driving in the enemy’s pickets on the Vaughan road, and then turning to the right, taking Poplar Spring road, finding nothing more than pickets until within half a mile of Boydton plank road, where the enemy was posted with artillery; withdrew and returned to camp same day.

September 3. – Went on picket on plank road.

September 6. – Relieved from picket; returned to camp; moved camp same p. m.

September 12. – Went on picket on the left of plank road.

September 15. – Relieved from picket; returned to camp.

September 16. – Went in pursuit of rebel cavalry with the rest of the brigade as far as Stony Creek, on the opposite side of which they were found posted in a strong position, having taken up the bridge, so that it was impossible to cross the creek; made an unsuccessful attempt.

September 17. – Returned to camp.

September 19. – One battalion went on scout to Lee’s Mill; drove in pickets of the enemy and re-established former picket-lines.

September 24. – Went on picket near Norfolk railroad.

September 27. – Relieved from picket; returned to camp.

September 29. – Broke camp; marched to Yellow Tavern and from there to Wyatt’s house, where the enemy’s pickets were found and driven in. The regiment went on a reconnaissance to the Vaughan via Wyatt road, but were obliged to retire, as the enemy drove the line on our left back to the Wyatt road.

September 30. – The regiment advanced on the Wyatt road and made a connection with the First Brigade, on the Vaughan road. No force was found in our immediate front; regiment picketed on flank of division during the night.

The regiment has marched 100 miles during the month [September].

SECOND PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

August 1. – Moved east of Prince George Court-House three miles, on the road to Fort Powhatan, and encamped; picketed the country and road in vicinity.

August 2. – Marched to north side of Prince George Court-House and encamped.

August 3. – Broke camp and marched to Temple’s house, on the road to Lee’s Mill. At 4 p. m. moved back to railroad; relieved by Sixth Ohio Cavalry, and marched to camp near Jordan’s Point.

August 5. – In camp.

August 6. – Went on picket on left of infantry front, on Jerusalem plank road.

August 9 and 10. – On picket.

August 11. – Relieved by First Brigade; returned to camp.

August 12. – In camp at Prince George Court-House.

August 13. – Moved across James River.

August 14 and 15. – Encamped at Deep Bottom.

August 16. – Met the enemy; loss, 2 men killed, 4 officers and 24 men wounded.

August 17. – Went into temporary camp until the 18th, when we attacked the enemy, losing in the engagement 4 officers and 28 men.

August 19. – Went on picket on Charles City road.

August 20. – On picket. At 9 p. m. withdrew pickets; crossed James and Appomattox Rivers; encamped near Prince George Court-House.

August 21. – Marched toward Reams’ Station and encamped near the Weldon railroad.

August 22. – On the Weldon railroad.

August 23. – Encamped at Reams’ Station; made a scout; engaged toward evening; 1 officer and 3 men wounded, 3 men killed, and 2 missing; encamped near the station during the night.

August 24. – On picket; was relieved by infantry.

August 25. – On picket near Wood’s Shop; fell back during the night to Jerusalem plank road.

August 26. – Relieved by the First Maine Cavalry.

August 27. – In camp.

August 28. – Picketed the roads and country between the Jerusalem plank road and Weldon railroad.

August 29. – On picket.

August 30. – Relieved and went into camp near Temple’s house, on Jerusalem plank road.

August 31. – In camp.

[September.] – In camp on Jerusalem plank road until September 2, when, at 2 a. m., moved to Weldon railroad, in front of Fifth Corps; regiment made a scout; no casualties; returned to railroad and remained in open field in rear of infantry until 5 p. m., when we returned to camp on the Jerusalem plank road.

September 3 to 5. – In camp.

September 6 to 8. – On picket.

September 9. – Moved camp on Jerusalem plank road relieved from picket.

September 10 to 14. – In camp.

September 15 to 17. – On picket.

September 18. – Regiment relieved from picket.

September 19. – In camp.

September 20. – In camp; regiment inspected.

September 21. – In camp; six companies went on picket.

September 22. – Went on picket.

September 24 to 28. – In camp.

September 29. – Broke camp and moved to Weldon railroad, on extreme left of infantry, about four miles from Reams’ Station; toward evening engaged the enemy on west of railroad. About 9 p. m. fell back on plank road and encamped.

September 30. – Moved down the plank road and picketed both flanks of the road until the morning of October 1.

October 1. – Relieved from picket by the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry; supported First Brigade near Wyatt’s house.

October 2. – Encamped near Wyatt’s house.

October 3. – In camp on the Vaughan road until the 4th, when, at 3 p. m., the regiment went on picket on the left of infantry.

October 5. – On picket.

October 6. – Relieved from picket and returned to camp on the Jerusalem plank road.

October 7 and 8. – In camp.

October 9. – Regiment went on picket.

October 12. – Regiment relieved from picket.

October 13 and 14. – In camp.

October 15. – Regiment went on picket.

October 26. – At 8 p. m. withdrew pickets and proceeded toward Weldon railroad; remained during the night near the Yellow House.

October 27. – At daylight moved down the Weldon railroad; thence to the Boydton plank road; engaged the enemy; 1 killed and 4 wounded; in the night fell back on the Weldon railroad.

October 28. – On the Weldon railroad near the Gurley house; returned to former camp on the Jerusalem plank road.

October 29 and 30. – In camp.

October 31. – Went on picket.

November 1 to 6. – On picket and in camp.

November 7. – Regiment went on scout, and returned the same day at 7 p. m.

November 8 to 30. – In camp and on picket.

December 1. – Started on raid to Stony Creek; returned to camp same day.

December 7. – Marched all day and encamped at Sussex Court-House.

December 8. – Marched at 4 a. m., had a slight skirmish with the enemy; 5 men captured.

December 9. – Marched to Belfield Station and encamped.

December 10. – Marched at 4 a. m.; on return encamped at Sussex Court-House.

December 11. – Marched at 11 a. m; encamped at Proctor’s house.

December 12. – Returned to camp; one battalion on picket until 11 p. m.

December 14 and 15. – In camp.

December 16. – Moved camp to east side of Jerusalem plank road.

FOURTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

August 1. – In camp near Prince George Court-House.

August 4. – Moved to a point on the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad with the Twenty-first [Pennsylvania] Cavalry and went on picket.

August 5. – Relieved, and moved to near Light-House Point, marching nearly all night.

August 7. – Went on picket near the Jerusalem plank road, and returned to camp, near Prince George Court-House, August 10.

August 11 and 12. – In camp.

August 13. – Broke camp; took up line of march at 4 p. m.; crossed

the Appomattox and James Rivers, marching all night.

August 14. – Advanced toward Malvern Hill; went on picket until night.

August 15. – On picket; returned, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry being engaged with the enemy all day, and remained on picket, occupying the former position.

August 16. – Advanced on the enemy dismounted and drove him on a charge to some distance, at which place Colonel J. Irvin Gregg, commanding brigade, while leading his command, was wounded in the right arm. Being supported by the infantry, the command mounted, driving the enemy across the swamp; remained there under a most desperate fire, holding the enemy for some time; the infantry being our support fell back so rapidly that we were compelled to endure great hardships to hold the enemy, and finally had to fall back a short distance, losing 2 men killed, 1 officer and 19 men wounded, 2 men missing, and a number of horses. The regiment then went on picket, and was relieved at dark the same day.

August 18. – Went on picket; attacked by the enemy; loss, 2 men wounded. Crossed James River on the night of August 20; the Appomattox the same night; marched all night; halted near Prince George Court-House.

August 21. – Moved at 11 a.m. to the Jerusalem plank road, relieving Third New York Cavalry; went on picket.

August 22. – Were relieved, and joined the brigade near Weldon railroad.

August 23. – Advanced toward Weldon, being on picket duty with the brigade; slightly engaged with enemy; Captain Parke and 2 men wounded; went on picket.

August 24. – Relieved by the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry; returned to brigade camp.

August 25. – Engaged with the enemy all day; on picket at night; relieved from picket.

August 26. – Joined the brigade at Temple’s house; remained in camp until August 30, when ordered on picket until the 31st.

During the month of September the regiment was doing picket duty near the Weldon railroad.

September 13. – Regiment, accompanied by the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, was on a scout to Poplar Spring Church; drove in the enemy’s pickets a respectable distance.

September 15. – Regiment was on a scout to Falls Church, being severely engaged with the enemy; Sixteenth Pennsylvania Regiment returned to camp.

September 29. – Marched toward Reams’ Station; were attacked by the enemy toward night and drove us; Major Peale taken prisoner; Captain D. P. Smith killed; Lieutenant John Harper wounded.

September 30. – Remained on battle-field.

[October.] – The command during the month was encamped on Jerusalem plank road doing picket duty, picketing the ground between the Halifax road and Jerusalem plank road.

October 26. – Broke camp and marched in the direction of Weldon railroad, and encamped that night at a point near the Yellow House.

October 27. – Marched at an early hour, being engaged with the enemy, and the division of the Second Army Corps, on Boydton plank road, being sharply engaged with the enemy, having but few casualties.

October 29. – Returned to formed camp near Jerusalem plank road.

[November.] – The regiment was doing principally picket duty with occasionally a little scouting.

November 7. – The regiment was ordered to join the division, which marched in the direction of Reams’ Station; returned same day; no casualties. During the remainder of the month the regiment was doing picket duty.

During the month of December the regiment participated in the engagement of Stony Creek Station; also in the late operations against the Weldon railroad. Average distance marched [in December], 200 miles.

EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

August 1. – Regiment went on picket near Davenport Church; four miles.

August 2 to 4. – On picket.

August 5. – Moved to Light-House Point and went into camp; ten miles. The Eighth Regiment went on picket near Lee’s Mill; thirteen miles.

August 11. – Relieved by First Pennsylvania Cavalry, and moved to Prince George Court-House; ten miles.

August 13. – Broke camp and crossed the Appomattox and James Rivers; eighteen miles.

August 14. – Regiment moved out by way of Willis’ Church to Malvern Hill; captured 10 prisoners. Regiment then joined the brigade; moved out to Charles City road, near Deep Bottom; went on picket; twenty miles.

August 15. – Enemy followed reconnoitering party and attacked the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, driving it across the swamp; Companies L and H the regiment deployed as skirmishers. The enemy advanced in force with infantry and artillery, and compelled us to fall back one mile and a half; threw up an abatis and checked their advance. At 4 p. m. the infantry moved out in front of the Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry; the Eighth and Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry charged the enemy, compelling them to fall back in confusion. At 8 p. m. the regiment fell back and went into camp.

August 16. – Command moved to Muddy Bottom; crossed and moved rapidly to White’s Tavern, supported by infantry. At 4 p. m. attacked by enemy in force and compelled to retire; moved back and encamped.

August 18. – Relieved by Thirteenth Pennsylvania and moved back to camp. At 3 p. m. command moved out toward Charles City road; the enemy attacked our lines; regiment dismounted and engaged the enemy, but was compelled to retire. At 10 p. m. went on picket.

August 19. – Relieved and went to camp.

August 20. – 9 p. m. moved; crossed James River.

August 21. – Crossed Appomattox; moved to plank road near McCamm’s house, fifteen miles; regiment on picket on Lee’s Mill road; one battalion moved to Gurley’s house, five miles.

August 22. – Moved to Gary’s Church; on picket.

August 23. – Relieved and moved out to Reams’ Station; dismounted and engaged the enemy; six miles.

August 24 and 25. – On picket. At 12 p. m. regiment withdrawn and moved to Temple’s house and encamped; twelve miles.

August 26. – Regiment moved out to Wood’s Shop on picket; six miles.

August 27 and 28. – On picket.

August 29. – Relieved and moved into camp; seven miles.

September 1. – In camp near Petersburg, Va.

September 2. – Moved out and made reconnaissance toward Petersburg and returned to camp same day, having discovered nothing of any consequence; marched nineteen miles; in camp until the 4th.

September 4 to 6. – On picket.

September 7 to 11. – In camp.

September 12 to 16. – On picket.

September 16. – Engaged the enemy dismounted.

September 17. – Engaged the enemy on Stony Creek road and returned to camp same night.

September 18 to 24. – In camp.

September 24 to 26. – On picket on Jerusalem plank road.

September 26 to 29. – In camp.

September 29. – Moved camp to Weldon railroad; crossed and moved to Wyatt’s house; went on picket near carter’s house; withdrew from picket and engaged the enemy; returned to Weldon railroad; encamped for the night; twenty-three miles.

September 30. – On picket near Carter’s house.

October 1. – Engaged the enemy on Vaughan road; on picket at night.

October 2. – Regiment moved out and skirmished with the enemy on Vaughan road; fell back during the night and encamped.

October 4. – Relieved by the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry and went into camp.

October 5. – Moved camp and marched to Light-House Point.

October 6. – On picket in the neighborhood of Sycamore Church; relieved by the Sixth Ohio Cavalry, and returned to plank road.

October 8 to 11. – In camp.

October 12. – Regiment went on picket.

October 15. – Relieved by the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

October 16 and 17. – In camp.

October 18. – Went on picket.

October 21. – Relieved by the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

October 24. – Went on picket.

October 27. – Regiment broke camp and marched to within six miles of Stony Creek; commenced skirmishing, which soon became a general engagement; lost 15 horses killed and 2 wounded; 1 man wounded and 1 missing; fell back during the night.

October 28. – Marched to Yellow House and joined brigade; went into camp on plank road.

October 29. – Changed camp.

November 1 to 3. – In camp near Petersburg.

November 3. – Regiment on picket on Lee’s Mill road; 1 man wounded by guerrillas.

November 6. – Regiment relieved.

November 7. – Regiment ordered on scout to Stony Creek and Reams’ Station; returned at night; met nothing but a few pickets, most of whom were captured by the First Brigade.

November 9. – Regiment on picket on Lee’s Mill road; a scouting party sent outside the lines were fired on by a party concealed in the swamp; 2 men wounded and 2 missing.

November 12. – Relieved.

November 18. – Went on picket.

November 21. – Relieved and returned to camp; received ten recruits from dismounted camp.

November 22. – Brigade reviewed by Major-General Meade.

November 24. – Went on picket.

November 27. – Relieved.

December 1. – Division on raid; captured and destroyed Stony Creek Station.

December 2 and 3. – On picket; reserve attacked at night; 2 men killed and 8 wounded.

December 4. – On picket.

December 5. – Relieved and returned to camp.

December 7. – Started on raid and encamped near Sussex Court-House.

December 8[11].- Crossed Meherrin River; 2 men killed, 1 wounded; marched toward Jarratt’s Station and encamped; crossed river at Mill-Dam Ford; drove the enemy; 1 man captured; marched to Three Creeks; 1 man killed and 1 wounded; returned and encamped at Proctor’s house.

THIRTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

August 1 to 13. – On picket with other regiments of the brigade in rear of army; encamped at Prince George Court-House.

August 13. – Broke camp at 5 p. m.; marched toward Charles City Cross-Roads; went to Charles City Cross-Roads with the First Maine in rear of the enemy’s pickets; Second Pennsylvania Cavalry appeared in front; attacked and captured 3 prisoners; killed 5; loss, 1 killed and 4 wounded. Picketed that road at Deep Run, supported by Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry; captured 1 prisoner; received 11 refugees and 12 contrabands.

August 15. – Attacked and drove in our regiment at 7 a. m. across Deep Run to the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and fell back skirmishing to support of brigade; advanced at 1 p. m. to cross-roads, driving enemy; loss, 1 killed, 6 wounded, and 5 missing.

August 16. – Moved out with brigade to cross-roads; advanced to near White’s Tavern; compelled to return again to old position at p. m. by force; loss, 10 wounded and 5 missing; relieved and went into camp.

August 17. – Inspected by Major Taylor.

August 18. – Relieved the Eighth Pennsylvania, on picket at Nelson’s farm; line attacked and forced back to brigade headquarters at p. m.; picketed Malvern Hill at 9 p. m., out Quaker road to Nelson’s farm; loss, 3 wounded and 5 missing.

August 18 and 19. – On picket.

August 20. – Picket withdrew at dark; crossed James and Appomattox Rivers; marched all night and encamped near army headquarters.

August 21. – Moved out to headquarters Fifth Army Corps, near Weldon railroad.

August 22. – On picket with the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry from plank road to brigade, near Reams’ Station; picket headquarters at Wood’s Shop.

August 23 and 24. – On picket.

August 25. – Relieved by Second Pennsylvania Cavalry; remained as support; at night moved with brigade to Temple’s house.

August 26 and 27. – In camp.

August 28. – Relieved Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, on picket on plank road.

August 29 and 30. – On picket; relieved, went to camp.

August 31. – In camp.

September 1. – In camp near Williams’ house.

September 2. – Moved with brigade across Weldon railroad at Yellow Tavern out to Vaughan road; fond the enemy in entrenchments; returned to Yellow Tavern and to camp in the evening.

September 3. – In camp; doing picket three days out of nine on the Jerusalem plank road until the 29th; then broke camp and moved with division to Weldon railroad; thence by Wyatt road out to Vaughan road and two miles toward Dinwiddie Court-House; First Battalion, driving the enemy’s pickets ahead, captured 7 prisoners; fell back across Vaughan road and remained until 4 o’clock, when the brigade was attacked and fought until dark, regiment losing 500 yards of ground, after two dismounted charges, losing 2 officers and 30 men killed, wounded, and missing; division encamped on Weldon railroad.

September 30. – Moved out in reserve to Wyatt’s supporting First Brigade.

October 1. – On picket on the Halifax road.

October 2. – Was relieved and marched to Vaughan road, near Squirel Level.

October 5. – Went on scout to Reams’ Station and returned same day.

October 6. – Moved to old camp near Williams’ house and went on picket on Jerusalem plank road.

October 9. – Was relieved and went into camp.

October 11. – Started toward Stony Creek Station and went to Leonard’s house; captured 13 prisoners and 2 teams.

October 15. – Went on picket on Jerusalem plank road.

October 18. – Was relieved and went to camp.

October 21. – Went on picket to Vaughan road.

October 24. – Was relieved.

October 26. – Broke camp and moved to Halifax road.

October 27. – Moved to Boydton plank road; engaged with enemy in the afternoon, having 2 men killed, 5 wounded, and 2 missing; returned to Halifax road at daylight.

October 28. – Moved to old camp on Jerusalem plank road.

October 30. – Went on picket on Jerusalem plank road.

November 1. – In camp on Jerusalem plank road.

November 6. – Relieved Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry on picket on Lee’s Mill road.

November 9. – Returned to camp.

November 28. – Scouted toward Stony Creek Station via Lee’s Mill road to Proctor’s house, plank road to Stony Creek Station road, and thence to Leonard’s house, driving the enemy’s pickets.

November 30. – Relieved Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry on picket on Lee’s Mill road.

December 1. – Marched to Stony Creek Station, taking the advance of the brigade at 3 a. m.; found the bridge at Lee’s Mill burned; repaired it and moved on to Rowanty Creek via Jerusalem plank and Stony Creek Station roads, finding the enemy picketing at Dunn’s house, with reserve at bridge over Rowanty Creek, which, after a few shots, retired, and the regiment moved on to Dunlap’s Station, about two miles north of Stony Creek, when the advance was taken by another regiment. The regiment then moved to Stony Creek Station by the Halifax road, remaining in support during the attack; 1 officer wounded.

December 7[8].- Moved to Hatcher’s Run, on the Vaughan road, with the Sixth Ohio and Third Pennsylvania Cavalry, Colonel M. Kerwin in command; found the enemy’s pickets at Cummings’ house; found their reserve at the run, strongly posted on the north side. The creek was

filled on either side of the ford with fallen trees and deep holes dug in and about the ford, making the position impracticable to mounted and almost so to dismounted men; had slight skirmish with the enemy, in which 2 officers and 5 men were wounded; the command returned to camp.

December 8[9]. – Moved to Hatcher’s Run with First Division, Second Army Corps, in command of Brigadier-General Miles, and after some skirmishing crossed and scouted to near Boydton plank road; returned at sundown to Cummings’ house.

December 9[10]. – Returned to camp.

December 10[11]. – Moved to Old Tavern, on the Jerusalem plank road; returned to Proctor’s at night.

December 11[12]. – Returned to camp.

December 14. – Went on picket near Zion Church.

December 17. – Relieved and returned to camp.

SIXTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

August 1. – In camp at Prince George Court-House, Va.

August 2. – Went on picket to Mount Sinai Church.

August 5. – Relieved and marched to Light-House Point.

August 6 to 8. – In camp.

August 9. – Marched to Prince George Court-House.

August 10 to 12. – In camp.

August 13. – Crossed Appomattox and James Rivers.

August 14. – Skirmish near Malvern Hill; on picket at same place.

August 15. – Relieved by the Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

August 16. – Moved on Charles City road; met the enemy; captured General Chambliss, C. S. Army, who afterward died of wounds received; heavily engaged.

August 17. – In camp.

August 18. – On picket.

August 21. – Crossed James and Appomattox Rivers; moved to the left wing of the army.

August 22. – In camp near Weldon railroad.

August 23. – Marched to Reams’ Station; went on a reconnaissance; discovered the enemy in considerable force; had considerable fighting; brigade ordered out; held line until dark.

August 24. – On picket one mile west of Reams’ Station, on battle-ground of 23rd instant.

August 25. – Picket driven in; enemy charged us; we countercharged and drove them; they returned with infantry; we fell back inside breast-works; acted as provost guard to infantry; loss, 2 killed and 5 wounded.

August 26. – Encamped near plank road.

August 27. – In camp.

August 28. – Moved camp one mile farther north.

August 29. – In camp.

August 30. – General inspection at 8 a. m.; relieved Thirteenth and Second Pennsylvania Cavalry on picket two miles and a half south of camp.

August 31. – On picket two miles and a half from McCann’s; reserve near plank road.

September 1 to 3. – On picket on Jerusalem plank road.

September 9 to 11. – Regiment on picket.

September 12. – Relieved by the First Maine Cavalry.

September 13 and 14. – In camp.

September 15. – Made a reconnaissance on the left of infantry via Poplar Spring Church toward Dinwiddie Court-House; had a slight skirmish; no casualties; returned to camp at 11 p. m.

September 16. – At 9 a. m. went with division on raid some ten or twelve miles outside our lines, on Jerusalem plank road; thence toward Stony Creek Station to railroad; returned to old camp at 7 p. m. of 17th; had no casualties.

September 18 to 27. – In camp; daily drill in manual of arms.

September 27 to 30. – On picket on Jerusalem plank road.

October 1 to 6. – Regiment on picket; enemy almost constantly scouting along picket-line.

October 7 to 26. – In camp and on picket.

October 26. – Regiment broke camp and marched with division to Yellow Tavern.

October 27. – Took and active part in engagement on Boydton plank road; loss, 5 men killed, 2 officers and 22 men wounded.

October 28 to 31. – In camp and mustered for pay.

November 1 to 30. – In camp, on picket, and building winter quarters.

December 1. – Regiment, with division, marched to Stony Creek Station; engaged the enemy; captured the station, with a number of prisoners and a large amount of commissary stores; returned to camp same day.

December 6. – Relieved from picket and prepared to march.

December 7. – Marched with division to Sussex Court-House, fighting; no casualties.

December 8. – At 4 a. m. marched to Jarratt’s Station, Weldon railroad; brigade engaged the enemy; regiment in reserve, supporting.

December 9. – Regiment on picket on Meherrin River.

December 10. – Returned to Sussex Court-House and encamped.

December 11. – Marched to Proctor’s house and encamped.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

FIRST MAINE CAVALRY.

October 1. – Regiment fell in the rear of First Brigade, which was moving from left to right on the Vaughan road, and acted as rear guard; were attacked by the enemy; the First Brigade withdrew across ice pond and formed; First Brigade was then ordered back and the regiment reported to Second Brigade; went into camp near Wyatt road.

October 2. – Moved out on the Squirrel Level road two miles; came back to camp.

October 8. – Nine companies went on picket under Major Thaxter.

October 9. – Returned to camp near Petersburg.

October 12. – Part of the regiment went on picket on Lee’s Mill road.

October 21. – Received orders to move at 2 p. m.; marched to near Yellow Tavern and encamped for the night.

October 27. – Marched at daylight, taking the Dinwiddie Court-House road to the military road; then followed the military road to Gravelly Creek; found the enemy in position with artillery; regiment dismounted and charged with Twenty-first Pennsylvania, mounted, on the flank; drove the enemy from the hill through their camp and took some prisoners; then fell in rear of brigade and marched to Boydton plank road, where a junction was made with the Second Corps. At 4 p. m. the

enemy attacked our division on the left and rear. The regiment dismounted and formed on the right of our lines and checked any farther advance of the enemy. At 12 m. received orders to move back to camp on the same road; arrived near Yellow Tavery on the morning of the 28th; regiment went on picket on the Wyatt road.

October 30. – Returned to camp near Petersburg.

October 31. – Mustered for pay.

Total loss during the month: 9 killed, 59 wounded, 12 missing. The regiment has marched 128 miles during the month.

[November.] – The regiment has been on picket three times during the month; has marched twenty-five miles.

December 1. – Companies C, D, F, G, H, and I (200 men), under the regimental commander, marched with the division via the McCann, Lee’s Mill, and Jerusalem plank roads toward Stony Creek Station; at the bridge across the Rowanty halted with the brigade, while the First and Second Brigades went to the station and accomplished their work. The enemy followed them on their return. The Firs Maine covered their crossing of the bridge; kept the enemy at ba until the pioneers destroyed the bridge and the division was well on their return. The duty of guarding the rear was then turned over to the Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry, but afterward, the rear being severely pressed, the First Maine was again ordered to protect it, which was again ordered to protect it, which was then turned over to the Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry, but afterward, the rear being severely pressed, the First Maine was again ordered to protect it, which was successfully done.

December 7. – At 6 a. m. moved with the division via the McCann, Lee’s Mill, and Jerusalem plank roads; forded the Nottoway near Freeman’s Bridge and bivouacked near Sussex Court-House.

December 8. – Moved at 5 a. m.; burned the railroad bridge across the Nottoway and the neighboring barracks; tore up and destroyed three-quarters of a mile of the railroad; advanced near Jarratt’s Station.

December 9. – Moved at 6 a. m.; advanced slowly along the railroad, guarding the infantry in their work of destruction; forded Three Creeks about 3 p. m., losing 3 horses; from 5 to 7.30 engaged in tearing up and destroying the railroad within range of the enemy’s guns at Belfield.

December 10. – Moved at 5 a. m. on the return march. After crossing Three Creeks halted until the infantry and cavalry were well on the road, when, with the Twenty-first Pennsylvania, acted as rear guard. Three or four miles below Jarratt’s Station the enemy pressed us with artillery; regiment formed this side of a shoal stream until the Twenty-first moved by, then checked the enemy and destroyed the bridge. Captain Heald’s battalion here took the rear; the rest of the regiment was ordered to close up the gap between the Third and First Brigades at Jarratt’s Station; relieved the Tenth New York and held the crossing until all the brigade passed. The enemy opened on the regiment sharply with artillery, but was successfully held in check, and did not afterward trouble the rear; bivouacked near Coman’s Well; marched to camp; the remainder of the month on picket.

SIXTH OHIO CAVALRY.

October 1. – Regiment was engaged in the action on the Vaughan and Squirrel Level roads, and met with considerable loss in men captured, owing to our dismounted skirmishers not being properly supported. Two officers and 44 men were captured by a mounted charge

of three regiments of the enemy. Three men were killed in this engagement, and it is quite probable that several of those captured were wounded.

The regiment, together with one squadron of the First U. S. Cavalry, the whole under orders from Captain Mason, of General Grant’s escort, were on a three days’ reconnaissance in the rear of the army. Scouting parties penetrated as far as Jamestown, Raccoon Castle, and Blackwater. The object of this movement seemed to be to drive from the country the enemy’s scouts and small parties, who were continually cutting the telegraph between Fort Powhattan and Jamestown; captured several wagons, negroes, citizens, & c. The duty of the regiment has been picketing the line extending from James River to left of army.

October 24. – The regiment was relieved from duty in the First Brigade, and ordered to report to commanding officer Third Brigade, Second Cavalry Division.

October 27. – Were on the advance of the cavalry in the advance of the army. Were in the action on the Boydton plank road, losing 1 officer and 2 men killed and 13 wounded. Returned to our old camp, and the end of the month finds the regiment picketing across the Vaughan road, connecting with infantry on right.

[November.] – No events of importance have occurred in this period; the regiment was with the division on the reconnaissance of the 7th instant; since that time no marching has been done.

December 8 to 10. – The regiment was engaged on the reconnaissance across Hatcher’s Creek, having a brisk fight with the enemy.

December 11. – Was with the expedition under Generals Warren and Gregg, going out to Hawkinsville, on the Jerusalem plank road, and returning to camp the same day.

SECOND NEW YORK MOUNTED RIFLES.

November 30. – Regiment was mounted and ordered to report to commanding officer Second Cavalry Division; assigned to Third Brigade, Second Cavalry Division, same date.

[December.] – The regiment participated in raid to Stony Creek, Va., the first duty done mounted; also the raid to Belfield. On returning formed the rear guard for Fifth Corps; was twice attacked by rebel cavalry, but successfully repulsed them. At Nottoway River three companies (B, E, and K), under Lieutenant Numan, Company K, were ordered back to pick up stragglers from the infantry column and guard them to army headquarters. The 10th this detachment was, with other forces, orderes on a reconnaissance; met the enemy at Hatcher’s Run; had a slight engagement. Number of miles marched by this command during the month, 150.

TWENTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

October 1. – Regiment was ordered to report to dismounted camp to be remounted; was remounted, and on the 17th reported to the commanding officer cavalry division.

October 26 to 28. – Participated in scout in the direction of the South Side Railroad; was engaged with the enemy on Boydton plank road October 27.

October 28. – Returned to camp near Petersburg.

November 7. – The regiment participated in a scout in the direction of Stony Creek; returned to camp same night.

December 7 to 11. – The regiment participated in raid to Stony Creek; also the raid to Belfield.

ARMY OF THE JAMES.

TENTH ARMY CORPS.*

August 14. – Leaving First Brigade, Second Division, on line at Bermuda Hundred, crossed the James, drove the enemy from his rifle-pits near the Kingsland road; crossed Bailey’s Creek and took a battery of four 8-inch howitzers.

August 15. – Moved to Deep Run.

August 16. – Battle of Deep Run.

August 18. – Moved on Long Bridge road to Ruffin’s; attack made by the enemy repulsed.

August 20. – Recrossed the James to entrenchments at Bermuda Hundred.

August 23. – Commenced exchange of place with the Eighteenth Corps, Tenth Corps taking position before Petersburg and Eighteenth Corps in entrenchments at Bermuda Hundred and Deep Bottom.

September 24. – Corps withdrawn from the lines in front of Petersburg.

September 28. – Marched to Deep Bottom.

September 29. – Crossed the James; carried the enemy’s lines at New Market Heights, and, advancing on the New Market road, took their line of entrenchments near the junction of the New Market and Mill roads; made reconnaissance within three miles of Richmond; returned to Laurel Hill and entrenched.

October 1. – Reconnaissance made in vicinity of Richmond by entire command, advancing on the Darbytown road to within two miles of the city and retired to our line of works at night.

October 7. – The enemy vigorously assaulted the lines in the night, causing the Cavalry Division to fall back. They were timely re-enforced by the First Division of this command, and the enemy repulsed with loss.

October 13. – A portion of the command made a reconnaissance, advancing on the Darbytown road about two miles, where the enemy were found in force, and were driven back into a newly constructed line of works, some three miles from our lines; skirmishing, & c.

October 27. – A third reconnaissance was made on the Darbytown road, the right of the column resting on the Charles City road; found the enemy strongly entrenched as before.

October 29. – Returned within our works.

[November.] – The corps holds the same position as per last return. The troops have been well drilled and are in a state of efficiency.

First Division.

August 13. – The First and Second Brigades left the entrenchments in front of Bermuda Hundred at 11 p. m. for Deep Bottom

August 14. – Arrived in the morning and joined the Third Brigade, already there. Attacked the enemy near the Kingsland road just after

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*Commanded by Major General David B. Birney to October 11, 1864; then by Bvt. Major General Alfred H. Terry.

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daybreak and carried the rifle-pits and entrenchments, taking 71 prisoners. in the afternoon a portion of the division again successfully attacked the enemy and captured a battery with four guns. At night moved to Strawberry Plains.

August 15. – Advanced beyond Long Bridge road to Deep Run.

August 16. – Attacked and carried the enemy’s works at Deep Run, capturing about 300 prisoners and 6 battle-flags.

August 18. – Attacked near Deep Run by the enemy, who were repulsed with loss.

August 20. – During the night the First and Second, Brigades recrossed James River and returned to the entrenchments in front of Bermuda Hundred, the Third Brigade returning to Deep Bottom.

August 23. – The First and Second Brigades moved over the Appomattox to the lines in front of Petersburg.

August 27. – The Third Brigade joined the division.

September 1 to 24. – During this period the division occupied the line in front of Petersburg between the Hare house and the Norfolk railroad, and was constantly employed in defending and strengthening the works.

September 24. – The Second corps having relieved the Tenth Corps in the works before Petersburg, the division encamped about one mile from the front on City Point road.

September 25 to 28. – Engaged in completing the equipment of the corps.

September 28. – The Tenth Corps marched from their encampment near Petersburg to Deep Bottom.

September 29. – The division took part in the successful movement against the enemy’s lines on the New Market Heights in the morning, and in the afternoon pushed forward in support of Kautz’s cavalry to a point three miles from richmond, on the Central road, whence it was withdrawn at sundown, by order of the corps commander, to the enemy’s lines on the New Market road near Laurel Hill.

September 30. – Defensive works thrown up in front of the camp.

October 1. – A reconnaissance was made by the entire command toward Richmond, Va., on the Darbytown road, advancing to within about two miles of that city, from which the inner line of defenses was distinctly visible, with small loss.

October 7. – The cavalry on our right having been driven in by the enemy, this command was ordered to their support, and repulsed a determined attack to turn our right flank with comparatively small loss.

October 13. – The division made a second reconnaissance on the Darbytown road, meeting the enemy in force two miles out, and driving him into a newly constructed line of works some three miles from our entrenchments. An unsuccessful attempt was made to carry the rebel line, and after heavy skirmishing until late in the afternoon the command returned to camp; casualties about 300.

October 27. – The division left camp before daylight and moved out on the Darbytown road for a third time, and met the enemy’s skirmishers to the right, and on the continuation of the line unsuccessfully assaulted on the 13th instant, early in the forenoon. The division line was gradually extended through the day to the right until it reached the Charles City road. By this disposition our right rested on the Charles City road. Heavy skirmishing with some artillery fire was continued throughout the day, but the line was not materially advanced. The enemy having a strong line of works in our front, which the plan

of operations did not contemplate our attacking, our line was maintained until early in the forenoon of the following day, when the command slowly retired without molestation on the part of the enemy and marched to camp. The casualties during this affair were about 80.

During the remainder of the month the division occupied their intrenched line without any event of note transpiring.

[November.]-The division occupies the same position as per last return, without having engaged in any offensive or defensive operations as regards the enemy.

November 1.-Six regiments of this command, together with a force from the Eighteenth Army Corps, constituting a provisional division, under the command of Brigadier General J. R. Hawley, Second Brigade, embarked for New York, reporting to Major General B. F. Butler, and were assigned by him to duty at various points about the city, for service in suppressing any disturbance that might arise on the day of presidential election (November 8). Happily, their services were not required.

November 15.-General Hawley’s troops embarked for their return, and reported for duty to their respective commands on the 17th.

First Brigade, First Division.

October 1.-Went on a reconnaissance toward Richmond, Va. Advanced nearly to the last defenses of the city. Returned without loss.

October 7.-Assisted in resisting an attack of the enemy on our works. Loss, 4 killed and 28 wounded.

October 9.-The One hundred and ninety-night Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers reported to the brigade.

October 13.-Went on a reconnaissance toward Richmond, Va. Met the enemy on the Darbytown road and drove in the pickets. Assaulting his works, was repulsed, with the loss of 9 killed, 153 wounded, 18 missing. The Eighty-fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers left for Jamestown Island.

October 27.-Went on a reconnaissance. Drove in the enemy’s skirmishers across the Darbytown road. Remained in front of these works until next day, and then withdrew to camp, with a loss of 4 killed, 30 wounded, and 2 missing.

[November.]-The brigade has been laying in works near Richmond, Va., on the New Market road, performing picket and fatigue duty. The brigade during this month has received 491 recruits, volunteers, substitutes, and drafted men; all as yet unarmed.

Second Brigade, First Division.

[August.]-At the beginning of the month this brigade held and picketed the right of Bermuda Hundred entrenchments on the James River.

August 12.-In the evening the brigade received orders to prepare every available man to march at a moment’s notice, with knapsacks and two days’ rations. Six hundred of the Sixteenth New York Heavy Artillery being engaged on the canal at Dutch Gap, the remainder of that battalion relieved the garrison of the Sixth Connecticut in Redoubt Carpenter.

August 13.-In the evening the brigade, accompanying the First Brigade of this division, marched to Deep Bottom, crossed the James there, and before daylight took position near the picket-line of the Third Brigade, which had been holding Deep Bottom.

August 14.-At daylight the division, under command of Brigadier General A. H. Terry, moved forward, the First and Third Brigades, driving in the enemy’s skirmish line, driving them out of their rifle-pits, this brigade supporting. The Sixth Connecticut was detailed to assist the Third Brigade, and, supporting the One hundredth New York, crossed Bailey’s Creek to the right and took a battery of the enemy containing four 8-inch siege howitzers. A portion of the Seventh Connecticut, in throwing out skirmishers to protect two light batteries, lost 5 or 6 killed and wounded. The division remained on the Kingsland road until 9 o’clock at night. It the moved by the right flank to the New Market road, and down to Strawberry Plains to a position in the rear of the Second Corps.

August 15.-It moved to the right of the Second Corps to a position mear the mill pond at Deep Run.

August 16.-Reconnoitering for an advance in the morning, the brigade found in its front an impassable mill pond and ravine. General Foster (Third Brigade) then undertook to advance on our right, executing a gradual left wheel to turn the enemy’s left, and drove him from his rifle-pits and picket-lines. This brigade followed in reserve and found the Third Brigade near the enemy’s breast-works, and the First Brigade massed (column of battalion in line), formed on the right of the Third Brigade line, immediately behind; charged over breast-works and into fields and woods beyond, partially wheeled to the left, and held position for an hour; the Seventh New Hampshire was halted at the works and used to protect the right. The Thirty-ninth Illinois was on our right, Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania on our left, and Craig’s brigade, of the Second Corps, came up on our left to help. After losing half the officers and about one-third of the men out on this fled, and finding that all our friends had fallen back to the breast-works, we fell back there also, then farther to the rear, finally throwing up breast-works about on the picket-line seized in the morning, and remained through the night. Lost in the fight of the 16th (battle of Deep Run), 233.

August 18.-At night went back to and up on the Long Bridge road to Ruffin’s. Held road until night of the 20th, when whole force (Second and Tenth Corps) recrossed the James.

August 24.-Started with the First Brigade (the Third Brigade and the rest of the Tenth Corps to follow) to relieve the Eighteenth Corps before Petersburg. Took to hold about 700 yards of the line, our left resting on the Suffolk railroad. Here remained through the month, losing some daily.

September 1 to 24.-The brigade held a portion of the line before Petersburg and participated in the labors of the siege.

September 24.-It was relieved by the Second Corps and bivouacked near Tenth Corps headquarters, where the corps was massed.

September 28.-It moved with the rest of the corps and formed part of the column which carried the enemy’s works at Deep Bottom.

September 29.-In the afternoon it marched with the division (Terry’s) to a point near Richmond, in support of General Kautz’s cavalry.

September 30.-The brigade day bivouacked at Laurel Hill, on the New Market road.

October 1.-The brigade, commanded by Colonel J. C. Abbott (Brigadier-General Hawley having gone to Connecticut with discharged men of the Sixth and Seventh Regiments Connecticut Volunteers and to get recruits if possible), led a reconnaissance of the Tenth Corps toward Richmond on the Darbytown road. When within about three miles of

the city the entire brigade deployed as skirmishers and advanced under a heavy artillery fire to within two miles of the rebel capital. Loss about —. Returning to its position in reserve on and rear the New Market road, in rear of the right flank of the Tenth Corps (which was on the right of the Eighteenth Corps), the Seventh Connecticut only being deployed in line on the right, it remained until the 7th, when the rebel divisions of Hoke and Field drove back General Kautz’s cavalry and attempted to turn the right flank. The First Division, Tenth Corps, was thrown as a refused line to meet them and the weight of onset fell on this brigade. After a close and hot fight, in which the brigade did not recede an inch, a portion of the enemy’s line coming within fifty yards, the rebels were signally repulsed. The brigade lost 137. This refused line was then strongly fortified with a good breast-work and two redans.

October 12.-Brigadier-General Hawley returned and resumed command.

October 13.-The First and Third Divisions reconnoitered on the Darbytown road a mile or two above Johnson’s or Timberlake’s house. This brigade had its left on that road and pressed the enemy into his works, the Seventh Connecticut as skirmishers, the Sixth Connecticut and Sixteenth New York [Heavy Artillery] in the first line, deployed, the Third and Seventh New Hampshire in the second line reserved. After holding the enemy in his works all day and skirmishing sharply (the Third New Hampshire going to the First Brigade as a reserve for its assault) we returned to our entrenchments with a loss of 51.

October 20.-The command of the Third Division fell on Brigadier-General Hawley and Colonel Abbott took command of the brigade.

October 27 and 28.-The command took part in a reconnaissance on the right of the lines on the Darbytown and Charles City roads, the skirmishers of the brigade resting their right on the last-named point. It remained during the two days, returning on the evening of the latter date. The fighting was entirely on the skirmish line. Loss in killed, wounded, and missing, 28.

October 29.-Brigadier-General Hawley resumed command, and until the end of the month the brigade remained in the entrenchments.

November 1 and 2.-In camp just on the right of the New Market road, Henrico County, Va., on the precise ground on which the brigade repulsed the enemy on October 7.

November 2.-At night Brigadier-General Hawley received orders to break camp and report by daylight on the river at Deep Bottom, leaving only the detachment of the Sixteenth New York Heavy Artillery in camp; reported as ordered. General Hawley being put in command of additional forces-comprising the Provisional Division-four other regiments from this division (First Division, Tenth Corps), and five from the Eighteenth Corps. Colonel Abbott assumed command of one brigade in the temporary organization, and Colonel Rockwell of the other.

November 3.-Embarked, changing vessels at Fort Monroe.

November 6.-Reported, as ordered, to Major-General Butler, at New York. The infantry (this brigade included) disembarked at Fort Richmond; the artillery at Fort Hamilton.

November 7.-At night, and 8th, in the morning (election day), all the troops embarked again. Colonel Abbott, with the Seventh New Hampshire and Seventh Connecticut, on the armed transport Augusta, took post off Catharine Street Ferry, East River. Colonel Rockwell, with the Sixth Connecticut and others, on the John Romer, off the foot of West Twenty-sixth street, North River, and Lieutenant-Colonel

Randlett, with the Third New Hampshire (under Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, One hundred and twelfth New York), on the ferry-boat Westfield, off West Forty-second street, North River. The other troops were similarly disposed about the city, Brigadier-General Hawley commanding the whole. Major-General Butler’s headquarters were at the Hoffman House. The troops remained thus until November 11, when they disembarked again at Forts Richmond and Hamilton, retaining sufficient transports for use in case of an emergency.

November 14 and 15.-Re-embarked on sea-going transports; the artillery were later.

November 17.-The troops of this brigade disembarked at Deep Bottom, and returned to their former and present position, as above. General Hawley resumed the command of the brigade.

November 30.-Was passed in rebuilding their utterly destroyed huts, receiving, equipping, and drilling recruits, road building, and other ordinary picket and fatigue duty.

Third Brigade, First Division.

October 7.-Repulsed a determined attack of the enemy to turn our right flank.

October 13 and 27.-Made successful reconnaissance on the Darbytown road. On the latter date recaptured and re-established the vedette and picket-line.

November 1.-The Eleventh Maine and Tenth Connecticut Volunteers were detached from this brigade and assigned temporarily to the command of Brigadier-General Hawley, and accompanied the expedition to New York Harbor.

November 17.-Rejoined the brigade. The Sixteenth New York Heavy Artillery was temporarily assigned to this brigade on the 1st and relieved on the 18th. The Two hundred and sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers was assigned to the brigade on the 1st instant.

Second Division.

August 1.-Division went into camp near Hatcher’s, Va.

August 13 to 21.-The Second and Third Brigades at Deep Bottom, Va., and participated in the different engagements during that time.

August 21.-The Second and Third Brigades returned to camp near Hatcher’s, Va.

August 28.-Division was relieved by General Ames’ division, Eighteenth Corps, and came to the entrenchments near Petersburg, where it had remained up to the present time [August 31.]

[September.]-This division was on duty near Petersburg up to the 28th of the month, at which time it took up the line of march for Deep Bottom, on the James River.

September 29.-Battle at Chaffin’s farm; division engaged; loss quite heavy. The remainder of the month manned the line of works near Chaffin’s farm.

[October.]-This division had during the month been guarding the line of works near Chaffin’s farm, on the north side of the James River.

October 27.-Battle of Darbytown road; loss in division, 311.

[November.]-The division during the month has been guarding the line of works near Chaffin’s farm, Va., on the north side of the James River.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

The monthly return for July left this brigade in the entrenchments at Bermuda Hundred, Va. Here it remained until August 13, when it received marching orders.

August 14.-Reached Deep Bottom after a night’s hard marching; crossed the pontoon and immediately took position in the front, doing picket duty throughout the night.

August 15.-At daylight moved to the right of the Second Corps, where the brigade rejoined the division to which it belongs.

August 16.-Occupied the works captured by General Terry’s division, doing picket duty throughout the night.

August 17.-Moved to Deep Bottom, relieving detachment of General Birney’s division.

August 21.-Relieved by General Foster’s division and ordered back to old position in the works at Bermuda Hundred, which was reached same day.

August 25.-A little before daylight firing commenced among the pickets, which finally ended in a charge, the enemy capturing some 200 yards of our works, which were handsomely retaken by a gallant charge of 100 men of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, with 1 commissioned officer and 22 men as prisoners.

August 26.-Colonel Barton reported from sick leave, and on the 27th resumed command of the brigade, relieving Lieutenant Colonel W. B. Coan, Forty-eighth New York Volunteers.

August 28.-Left Bermuda Hundred for Petersburg, which was reached at 10 p.m., taking the position recently held by the Eighteenth corps, where the brigade remains at the end of the month.

[September.]-The monthly return for August left this brigade in the entrenchments before Petersburg, Va., where it remained until the night of the 24th, when it moved back to the right and rear of the Tenth Corps headquarters, where it remained until the 28th.

September 28.-The brigade left at 3 p.m. and proceeded to Deep Bottom, where it arrived at 1 o’clock after a fatiguing night’s march.

September 29.-At about 7 a.m. the Seventy-sixth and Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and the Forty-eighth and Forty-seventh New York Volunteers, moved with the division and proceeded to the front on the New Market road toward Richmond. At about 12 m. the brigade was ordered to support Colonel Daggett’s brigade, which was about to charge a position of the enemy’s works, which was held near Chaffin’s farm. The brigade was then ordered to take a position on the right of the division and to assist in the assault on Chaffin’s farm. The assault was unsuccessful. At dusk the brigade was ordered to fall back about one mile, near where it remains at the present time [September 30.]

[October.]-The monthly return for September left this brigade in the entrenchments near Chaffin’s farm, Va., where it remained until the 7th, when, at about 8 a.m., the enemy made an attack on our right, driving in the pickets, but were handsomely repulsed by our troops. This command was moved a few hundred yards to the right, where it remains at present [October 31.]

October 27.-This morning the brigade was formed into line in obedience to orders in light marching order at 5 a.m.; moved out on Darbytown road and formed line of battle. A strong line of skirmishers was sent forward, which succeeded in driving the enemy from and holding another line of rebel works. The position was held until 2

p.m. of the 28th, when, in obedience to orders, the brigade moved back to camp and occupied its old position, where it remains at the time of forwarding this report [October 31.]

Third Division.

October 13.-Division took part in reconnaissance on Darbytown road.

October 27 and 28.-In reconnaissance near the Kell house, Va.

In both reconnaissance only the skirmish lines of the division were engaged with the enemy.

[November.]-This division has been stationed near the New Market road, near Richmond, Va., since last return.

First Brigade, Third Division.

September 24.-The brigade was withdrawn from the trenches in front of Petersburg, Va.

September 28.-Moved across the Appomattox and James River to Deep Bottom, Va.

September 29.-Moved out from Deep Bottom. In the afternoon participated in an assault on Fort Gilmer, a rebel earth-work near Chaffin’s farm, which was unsuccessful.

September 30.-Took part in engagement at Fort Harrison, Chaffin’s farm, in which the enemy were repulsed, with loss. The loss of the brigade in these two engagements amounted to 434 officers and men.

[October.]-Engaged in two reconnaissance to the right.

October 13.-Darbytown road: 1 officer-Second Lieutenant J. G. Kribs, Ninth U. S. Colored Troops-wounded, 2 enlisted men killed and 10 wounded. Returned to camp same day.

October 27 and 28.-Kell’s house:Brigade slightly engaged in skirmishing. Losses, 1 officer-Captain A. H. Cheney, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops-slightly wounded and 1 enlisted man killed and 32 wounded.

Remainder of time have been engaged in regular routine of camp life.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

October 6.-The brigade was formed and commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Armstrong, Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, who was relieved, in accordance with Special Orders, No. 16, headquarters Third Division, by Colonel U. Doubleday, of the Forty-fifth U. S. Colored Troops, October 8, 1864, and he in turn was relieved by Colonel E. Wright, Tenth U. S. Colored Troops, who assumed command in compliance with Special Orders, No. 27, headquarters Third Division, Tenth Army Corps, October 29, 1864.

October 12.-The brigade, under Colonel Doubleday, with the rest of the corps, went on a reconnaissance a short distance beyond the Kell house, but returned without doing anything.

October 13.-Went on a reconnaissance on the Darbytown road in company with most of the corps. At night, after skirmishing all day, fell back in good order, having lost during the day in killed and wounded, 55.

October 27.-This brigade, with the First Brigade, was on the left of the Tenth Corps and occupied the woods in front of the Kell house. Skirmished all day and all night, when relieved by the First Brigade. Lost during the day about 70 killed and wounded.

October 28.-In the afternoon fell back to camp which it has occupied since formation.

[November.]-The brigade has been engaged during the month in repairing roads, fortifications, and building camps.

November 2.-The Forty-first U. S. Colored Troops and One hundred and twenty-seventh U. S. Colored Troops joined the brigade per Special Orders, No. 31, headquarters Third Division, Tenth Army Corps. By the same order the Twenty-ninth Connecticut Colored Volunteers were transferred to First Brigade, Third Division, Tenth Corps.

EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS.

[August.]-In obedience to orders of date August 24, 1864, from department headquarters (Special Orders, No. 232), the Eighteenth Corps was relieved from the trenches in front of Petersburg, Va., by the Tenth Corps. The corps removed to the west side of the Appomattox, taking up positions along the line of works extending from the Appomattox to the James, the headquarters being established at Hatcher’s farm, near Bermuda Hundred, Va.

October 1 to 26.-The corps occupied the position gained by them in the engagement of September 29.

October 27.-In the morning the corps made a demonstration on the enemy’s left, the object being to prevent their sending troops across the James River to re-enforce their right, which demonstration being highly successful, the corps returned and occupied their former position on the 29th, which position it now [October 31] occupies.

First Division.

August 26.-The division left the trenches in front of Petersburg at night and moved to its present camp, near Bermuda Hundred. Nothing of importance occurred in the division during the month.

First Brigade, First Division.

[October.]-The command has been stationed at Fort Burnham (lately known as Fort Harrison) until October 26, when it moved, taking the advance of the Eighteenth Army Corps in the march to Seven Pines, on the Williamsburg turnpike.

October 27.-Participated in the operations of that movement.

October 28.-Returned to Fort Burnham in the evening.

October 30.-Moved to the right of Fort Burnham, the left of the brigade now resting at the right of that fort.

The command has been actively employed working on earth-works, &c., near this place.

November 3.-The Eighty-first and Ninety-eighth [New York] Regiments of this brigade marched to Deep Bottom, Va., embarked that day and proceeded to New York with other forces of the department. Remained in New York Harbor until the night of the 14th, when they sailed for Deep Bottom, Va.

November 17.-Arrived at Deep Bottom and marched to camp at this place and resumed position in the front line, where, with the remainder of the brigade, they are at present [November 30.]

The command is in a good state of efficiency, but, being very much reduced in numbers, requires many recruits to make it fully effective as a brigade.

First Brigade, Second Division.

August 26.-Command moved from the front before Petersburg to near Point of Rocks.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

[August.]-The brigade lay in the trenches before Petersburg (participating in the engagement of the 5th instant) until the 25th, when it moved across the Appomattox and now [August 31] lies encamped near Point of Rocks, Va. It has become during the campaign much reduced in numbers.

September 1 to 28.-This brigade was stationed on the line of trenches between the James and Appomattox Rivers.

September 29.-In the morning took up our line of march, crossing the James River at Jones’ Landing, where we soon met the enemy and participated in the assaults and carrying of the enemy’s works on that day, and the repulse of the enemy’s charges on the 30th.

The colonel commanding takes pleasure in saying that he cannot bestow too much praise upon the officers and men of this brigade for their courage and fidelity.

[October.]-This brigade has for the last month been stationed in the trenches on the north side of the James, upon the left of Fort Burnham.

October 26.-The brigade was withdrawn from the line.

October 27.-Took up their line of march, crossing at the head of White Oak Swamp, striking the Williamsburg turnpike at Fair Oaks, where we met the enemy. A portion of the Eighth Maine, deployed as skirmishers and led by Lieutenant-Colonel McArthur, charged the enemy’s works, losing over 50 men and 1 officer. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the gallant McArthur and the men and officers under him.

Third Division.

August 3.-Brigadier-General Paine relieved General Carr in command of the division, and the division was reorganized same date by orders from headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, as per report of organizations on the back of this return.

The Second Brigade remained on duty before Petersburg until the 25th, when, with division headquarters, it was removed to Deep Bottom, Va. The headquarters of the First Brigade are near Petersburg, the Thirty-seventh Regiment, of the First Brigade, is on detached service at Wilson’s Wharf. The headquarters of the Third Brigade is at Deep Bottom. The brigade is on detached service-the Tenth Regiment at City Point, and the Fourth and Sixth Regiments at Dutch Gap. The headquarters of the Second U. S. Colored Cavalry is at Deep Bottom. The First U. S. Colored Cavalry was ordered to Fort Monroe, Va., by the order reorganizing the division.

September 29.-The entire division, with the exception of the Tenth U. S. Colored Troops, moved from Deep Bottom, and was successfully engaged in the assault on the enemy’s works, losing heavily in officers and men.

The division now [September 30] occupied the left of the line held by the Eighteenth Army Corps, near Chaffin’s Bluff.

[October.]-The division occupies the extreme left of the line on the north side of the James.

October 27.-The First and Second Brigades of the division moved to the right with a portion of the Eighteenth Corps. The Second Brigade was temporarily attached to the Second Division. The First Brigade, under command of Colonel J. H. Holman, engaged the enemy in their works on the Nine-Mile road. The command withdrew from their advanced position on the evening of the same day, and on the following day returned to their former position, which it now [October 31] occupies.

[November.]-The division occupies the same position on the line as at last report.

First Brigade, Third Division.

August 3.-The division reorganized and announced in General Orders, No. 90, headquarters Third Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, the First Brigade to consist of the First, Twenty-second, and Thirty-seventh U. S. Colored Troops. The First and Twenty-second went into camp near the signal tower on General Butler’s line, and the Thirty-seventh was on picket on the south side of the Appomattox River, headquarters near the signal tower.

August 25.-Brigadier General William Birney assumed command of the Third Division, Tenth Army Corps, and designated the First and Twenty-second Regiments as his Second Brigade. He crossed the Appomattox and the regiments lay in the trenches near the mine until the 28th, when they were relieved and went into the trenches near the Hare house.

The Thirty-seventh was ordered to Wilson’s Wharf, and on the night of September 1 the brigade headquarters were moved with the First Regiment to Harrison’s Landing.

September 1.-Brigade headquarters, with the First U. S. Colored Troops, were ordered to Harrison’s Landing, James River, Va., by orders from headquarters Third Division, Tenth Army Corps. General Birney, having assumed command of the Third Division, Tenth Army Corps, designated the First and Twenty-second Regiments U. S. Colored Troops as his Second Brigade, leaving the Twenty-second Regiment U. S. Colored Troops behind in General Birney’s command. The Thirty-seventh remained at Wilson’s Wharf, Va., until the 28th, when it joined the First U. S. Colored Troops at Harrison’s Landing, and, with brigade headquarters, proceeded to Deep Bottom, arriving on the morning of the 29th, where the Twenty-second U. S. Colored Troops, having been previously relieved from duty with the Third Brigade, Tenth Army Corps, joined us, and our brigade formed in line on the right and participated in the fight all day. At night the First Brigade was ordered to the left and worked all night, throwing up works in rear of the fort on Chaffin’s farm.

September 30.-In the morning the enemy charged our line and the fort. Our loss was slight.

[October.]-The troops of this brigade remained in the trenches in their old position on the left until the morning of the 26th, when they were withdrawn and marched to the rear some two miles, for the purpose of getting rations and ammunition.

October 27.-Starting at 5 a.m., marched for the enemy’s works in front of Richmond in rear of the column. Arriving at the Williamsburg road, we found the head of the column already engaged. The brigade was soon ordered to proceed to the right across the York River Railroad, and advanced up the Nine-Mile road until within sight of the

enemy’s fortifications, which we found about one mile above Fair Oaks Station. We attacked and carried a redoubt, but were unable to hold it and soon fell back to the Williamsburg road.

October 28.-Marched back to our old position on the left and still remain there [October 31.]

Second Brigade, Third Division.

[September.]-The entire brigade has been encamped at Deep Bottom, Va., during the month.

September 29.-It advanced, assaulting the works of the enemy at New Market Heights, carrying them.

September 30.-Occupied a position on Chaffin’s Bluff during the attempt of the enemy to retake that position, but took no immediate part in that action. In the afternoon moved to a position below Chaffin’s Bluff and intrenched.

[October.]-The brigade has occupied the same position during the entire month, excepting an absence of three days on the reconnaissance of this corps on the 26th, 27th, and 28th at Seven Pines and Fair Oaks, Va., during which it took part in no engagement.

[November.]-The brigade has occupied the same position in the trenches since last return, without any new operations.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

August 3.-The brigade was relieved in trenches in front of Petersburg; marched to and encamped near Point of Rocks.

August 16.-The Fourth and Sixth Regiments U. S. Colored Troops ordered to Dutch Gap, Va.

August 25.-The Tenth Regiment U. S. Colored Troops marched across the Appomattox, and was assigned to position in trenches in front of Petersburg; brigade headquarters moved to south side of Appomattox, near Petersburg front.

August 26.-Brigade headquarters moved to Deep Bottom.

August 27.-The Tenth U. S. Colored Troops ordered to City Point.

August 31.-Brigade headquarter remain at Deep Bottom. The Fourth and Sixth U. S. Colored Troops remain at Dutch Gap. The Tenth U. S. Colored Troops remain at City Point.

September 1.-The Fourt and Sixth U. S. Colored Troops at Dutch Gap, Va.; brigade headquarters at Deep Bottom, Va.

September 10.-Brigade headquarters moved to Dutch Gap.

September 28.-The Fourth and Sixth U. S. Colored Troops moved to Deep Bottom on transports.

September 29.-The Fourth and Sixth U. S. Colored Troops moved out of the works at Deep Bottom and advanced toward the New Market road; met the enemy at daylight; drove in his pickets and charged his line of rifle-pits at New Market Heights; advanced to Laurel Hill Church; then marched to Chaffin’s Bluff and bivouacked.

September 30.-Moved into the works on the right of Fort Harrison. In the afternoon moved down the Varina road and bivouacked on Chaffin’s farm, about a quarter of a mile east of Fort Harrison; threw up breast-works during the night. The Tenth U. S. Colored Troops was at City Point during the month, doing provost guard duty.

[October.]-The Fourth and Sixth U. S. Colored Troops were on duty in the entrenchments on Chaffin’s farm, Va.; during the month.

The Tenth U. S. Colored Troops were on duty at City Point, Va., during the month.

[November.]-The Fourth and Sixth U. S. Colored Troops were in the entrenchments on the left of the line of the Eighteenth Army Corps until the 4th, at which time they went into camp in reserve near the center and a short distance in the rear of the line of the Eighteenth Army Corps. The Tenth U. S. Colored Troops have been doing provost duty, &c., at City Point, Va., during the month.

Provisional Brigade.

November 3.-Sent the One hundred and seventh Regiment U. S. Colored Troops to the front at Fort Brady.

November 7.-Left camp at Cox’s field and occupied the new line in front of Deep Bottom with two regiments by order of Major-General Weitzel, commanding Eighteenth Army Corps.

November 27.-Assigned command of post at Deep Bottom, with detachments of 150 men and 3 officers of the Two hundred and third Pennsylvania Volunteers, on provost duty, and with the One hundred and ninth U. S. Colored Troops, on duty in the lines in front of the post, by order of Major-General Terry, commanding Tenth Army Corps.

TWENTY-FOURTH ARMY CORPS.*

First Division.

December 4.-The First Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, organized under instructions from department headquarters.

December 10.-The enemy made a reconnaissance in force on the right of this division, but retired without any serious attack after driving in the pickets.

First Brigade, First Division.

[December.]-The brigade has been lying in works near Richmond, Va., on the New Market road, performing picket and fatigue duty.

Second Brigade, First Division.

[December.]-During this month the brigade has remained in its position at the angle of the line of entrenchments just on the right of the New Market road, near Cox’s, where it fought October 7, without any incident in its history, save the going done home of the men of the Seventh New Hampshire, whose three years’ term had expired, and the arrival of a moderate percentage of the substitutes sent from home. Building huts and corduroy road, picket duty, and drill occupied the time.

Fourt Brigade, First Division.

December 10.-Field’s division, of Longstreet’s corps, of the enemy, appeared in our front on a reconnaissance. After the cavalry pickets were driven in the Eighth Maine became slightly engaged, and slight skirmishing continued during the day, during which Captain Henry E. Tozier, Eighth Maine Volunteers, and 6 enlisted men of that regiment were killed and 4 wounded. The enemy retired after dark.

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*Organized by the consolidation of the white infantry troops of the Tenth and Eighteenth Army Corps, in accordance with General Orders, No. 297, War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, December 31, 1864; commanded by Major General E. O. C. Ord.

—————

Second Division.

December 1 to 7.-This division was encamped at Chaffin’s farm, when it received marching orders; marched to Bermuda Hundred.

December 8.-Embarked on transports for Fort Fisher, N. C.

December 28.-The expedition proving unsuccessful, the division returned to its old camp at Chaffin’s farm, where it now [December 31] remains.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

[December.]-The monthly report for November left this brigade in the entrenchments near Chaffin’s farm, Va., where it remained until the 7th.

December 7.-About 4 p.m. the brigade was formed into line and proceeded to Bermuda Hundred.

December 8.-Reached Bermuda Hundred at 8 a.m. and immediately embarked on board the steamers Perit, Eliza Moore, and Idaho, and proceeded down the James River to Fort Monroe, where the fleet remained at anchor until the 13th, when the vessels were got under way and proceeded up the Potomac River to Matthias Point; then turned back and proceeded to sea and sailed southward.

December 15.-Arrived off Wilmington, N. C., and remained there until the morning of the 19th, when the vessels were ordered to Beaufort, N. C., for the purpose of taking in coal and water.

December 24.-Got under way and steamed back to old position off Wilmington, and at about 12 m., while the gun-boats were bombarding the fort, a part of the brigade was landed, but was ordered to re-embark before engaging the enemy.

December 27.-Started for Fort Monroe; arrived there about sunset on the 29th.

December 30.-Proceeded up the James and landed at Deep Bottom at 7 p.m., and marched back to old position near Chaffin’s farm, Va., where the brigade remains at the present time.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

December 7.-The brigade broke camp, excepting the Ninth Maine Volunteers, and marched to the Bermuda Hundred front; bivouacked for the night.

December 8.-Marched to Bermuda Landing; embarked on board transports and sailed for Fort Monroe. After being on board the transports about one week, and suffering the usual hardships incident thereto, received orders to get under way and put to sea; sailed for the coast of North Carolina. Disembarked on the beach on Federal Point, N. C., about two miles from the rebel work Fort Fisher.

December 25.-Commenced to advance on that work; when within about one mile received orders to re-embark immediately; commenced the work at once, but owing to the very heavy surf on the beach did not complete the re-embarkation until the 27th instant.

December 27.-Sailed for Fort Monroe, Va.; thence up the James River to Jones’ Landing; disembarked and marched to our old camp, arriving there on the 30th.

First Division, Department of West Virginia (attached).

December 19.-The division left Camp Russell, near Winchester, Va.; went to Washington by cars; thence to this point by transports.

First Brigade, First Division, Department of West Virginia (attached).

December 19.-Left Opequon Crossing, Va., by cars, at 12 m., en route for Washington.

December 20.-Took transports at Washington in the morning.

December 23.-Arrived at City Point, Va., at 6 p.m.

December 24.-Formed camp here by order of Brigadier-General Terry, and temporarily attached to the Twenty-fourth Army Corps, Army of the James.

Second Brigade, First Division, Department of West Virginia (attached).

December 19.-The Fourth West Virginia Volunteer Infantry was permanently detached from this brigade, and the Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry and Twenty-third Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry added to it, all by order of Major-General Crook, commanding Department of West Virginia. The same day the brigade moved via Washington, D. C., to the camp of the Twenty-fourth Army Corps, Army of the James.

Distance traveled, 260 miles.

Third Brigade, First Division, Department of West Virginia (attached).

December 1.-The command-comprising the Tenth, Eleventh, and Fifteenth West Virginia Volunteers, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Twenty-third Illinois Veteran Volunteers-was encamped at Camp Russell, Va., in the Army of the Shenandoah, until the morning of the 19th.

December 19.-Broke camp and took up line of march via Winchester to Stephenson’s Depot, on the Harper’s Ferry and Winchester Railroad. Before embarking on the cars the Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania and Twenty-third Illinois Volunteers were transferred from this brigade to the Second Brigade of the division. The command then proceeded by rail via Summit Point, Charlestown, and arrived at Harper’s Ferry at night; from thence via Sandy Hook, Monocacy, and Relay House, arriving in Washington on the morning of the 20th.

December 20.-Embarked on board transports at Washington and left the city at night, proceeding down the Potomac; the weather very cold and rainy, subjecting the men to some exposure. After crossing a portion of the Chesapeake Bay the command proceeded up the James River.

December 23.-Arrived at Bermuda Hundred in the morning, a portion of the command not arriving. The same day Colonel Milton Wells, Fifteenth West Virginia Volunteers, then in command, reported with that portion of his command which had arrived to General Ferrero.

December 24.-The remainder of the command arrived, when we went into camp and commenced building winter quarters. Remained until the end of the month.

Distance traveled during the month, 480 miles.

TWENTY-FIFTH ARMY CORPS.*

[December.]-The Twenty-fifth Army Corps was organized per General Orders, No. 297, War Department, dated December 3, 1864.

—————

*Organized by General Orders, No. 297, War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, December 3, 1864, and composed of the colored troops of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina; commanded by Major General Godfrey Weitzel.

—————

The larger portion of the First Division, commanded by General C. J. Paine, formed a part of the expeditionary corps that sailed from Fort Monroe, Va., on December 10, under command of Major-General Butler, contemplating an assault on Wilmington, N. C.

December 30.-The troops returned, having suffered little or no loss. Major General G. Weitzel was in command of the infantry force of the expedition. The infantry troops of the corps have performed the usual fatigue, picket duty, &c.; have been instructed in company, battalion, and skirmish drills, and are rapidly improving in discipline and efficiency.

This corps holds the line of works near Chaffin’s farm, Va., which has been heretofore held by the Eighteenth Army Corps.

First Division.

[December.]-The division was organized, by confidential order from headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, December 1, 1864.

December 7.-The division headquarters, the Second Brigade, with the Thirtieth Regiment of the First Brigade, temporarily attached, left camp before Richmond, and accompanied the expedition to Fort Fisher.

December 23.-Returned to camp before Richmond.

First Brigade, First Division.

[December.]-The brigade was organized on the 2nd instant. During the month a portion of the command (First and Thirtieth Regiments) has been absent with the expedition against Wilmington, N. C.

Second Brigade, First Division.

December 7.-The brigade being part of the expeditionary force against Wilmington, N. C., left camp at Chaffin’s farm, Va.

December 8.-Embarked on transports at Bermuda Landing at night.

December 25.-About 150 officers and men of the Fourth U. S. Colored Troops landed above Fort Fisher and immediately re-embarked. On the return of the expedition the brigade disembarked at Bermuda Hundred.

December 30.-Reached its old camp at Chaffin’s farm.

The Thirtieth U. S. Colored Troops was temporarily attached to the brigade for the purposes of the expedition, joining December 7.

Third Brigade, First Division.

December 31.-Moved from the defenses of Bermuda Hundred to a point on the left of Fort Burnham, across the James River.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

[December.]-The Twenty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops on detached duty at City Point, Va.

The Thirty-first U. S. Colored Troops on an expedition between the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers, for the purpose of driving out guerrillas. They left camp on December 14 and returned on the 24th without any casualties.

December 30.-The brigade left the defenses of Bermuda Hundred, and arrived at present camp, near Bailey’s house, Va., same day.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

[December.]-The Second Brigade was organized on December 5, and has occupied the line of breat-works between Fort Burnham and Battery No. 3 since that date.

December 10.-Captain E. C. McFarland and one private of the Forty-first U. S. Colored Troops were wounded on the picket-line in front of the Forty-first.

CAVALRY DIVISION.

First Brigade.

[August.]-This brigade has been doing picket duty during this month from Petersburg and Weldon Railroad toward Fort Powhatan, on the James River.

Second Brigade.

The brigade performed picket duty in neighborhood of Lee’s Mill from July 31 to August 2.

August 3.-Marched from Lee’s Mill to the line of Mount Sinai Church and Cocke’s Mill, Prince George County, Va.

August 4 to 18.-Performed picket duty on that line.

August 18.-Left the picket-line and reported to Major-General Warren, Fifth Army Corps, near Reams’ Station, on the 19th.

August 21 to 25.-The brigade participated in the following engagements: 21st, on Weldon railroad and skirmish with cavalry on Vaughan road; 22d, skirmish on Vaughan road; 23rd, cavalry action at Reams’ Station; 24th, skirmish with cavalry on the Weldon railroad below Reams’ Station; 25th, battle of Reams’ Station, under command of Major-General Hancock, Second Corps.

August 26 to 31.-Brigade doing picket duty on line from Mount Sinai and Sycamore Churches, Va., until September 16, when the line was broken by a dash of rebel cavalry, resulting in the killing and capturing of 216 officers and men from this brigade; pursued the enemy until the morning of the 17th, when the brigade, returning, established a new line from Rollins’ house to Cocke’s Mill, Va.

[September.]-The brigade performed picket duty on the in of Mount Sinai and Sycamore Churches, Va., until September 16, when the line was broken by a dash of rebel cavalry, resulting in the killing and capturing of 216 officers and men from this brigade; pursued the enemy until the morning of the 17th, when the brigade, returning, established a new line from Rollins’ house to Cocke’s Mill, Va.

September 26.-Changed picket-line; established a new line, extending from Bland’s house to Coggins’ Point, Va., on the James River.

September 27.-Were relieved from picket-line by Brigadier-General Davies, Second Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and moved to Jones’ Neck, Va., via Prince George Court-House and pontoon bridge across the Appomattox River.

September 30.-Established headquarters near Johnson’s house, Va.

[October.]-The brigade has been constantly on picket duty for the last month; engaged the enemy at Johnson’s far, Va., October 7 and 13, and on the Williamsburg pike on the 27th; brigade constantly on hard and arduous duty.

[November.]-The brigade has been performing arduous picket duty for the past month in the face of the enemy on the line north of the James.

[December.]-The brigade has performed picket duty during the month on the line designated by the division commander.

December 10.-In the morning the enemy made their appearance in front of the line, and after a slight skirmish was driven away; all quiet since.

Third Brigade.

October 13.-The brigade marched out to the Darbytown road, where they became engaged with the enemy and where they suffered a loss of 24 killed and wounded.

October 27.-The brigade marched out to the Charles City and Williamsburg roads, and returned with a loss one officer wounded, Captain J. K. Buckley, Company C, First Maryland Cavalry, shout through the head.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 41-116

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