Number 131. Siege of Petersburg Report of Lieutenant Colonel Charles M. Cornyn, One hundred and twenty-second Ohio Infantry, of operations March 25

   

0 comments

in Siege of Petersburg Reports (95)

No. 131. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Charles M. Cornyn, One hundred and twenty-second Ohio Infantry, of operations March 25.1

HEADQUARTERS 122nd OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
April 16, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that on the 25th of March last I received orders to have my regiment fall in and march out in rear of the One hundred and tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Colonel Binkley, and form line on their right, in rear of the reserve picket-post of the Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, which was immediately in front of the camps of the Second Brigade, of that division and within gunshot of the enemy’s picket-line. Arriving there with my regiment in heavy marching order, I learned that these regiments were to charge the enemy’s picket-lines. I had my men unsling knap-sacks and pile them on the field and prepare for the charge, with bayonets fixed. The ground over which we had to charge was marshy, and covered with brush, which impeded much the rapidity of the advance. Receiving the order from Colonel Binkley to forward, march, a triumphant shout went up from the whole line, and all started on the double-quick for the enemy’s works, from behind which heavy volleys of musketry were poured into the line as it advanced. Arriving at a point over half way between our our and the enemy’s picket-line, a check was given to the advance by the increased fire from the enemy, and the opening of their artillery, and an immediate fall-back took place. Many soldiers, securing themselves as well as possible behind stumps and other obstructions, remained in their advanced positions rather than expose themselves to the enemy’s fire in endeavoring to get to the rear. Being reorganized after the fall-back, we were re-enforced by the One hundred and twenty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Ninth New York, Sixth Maryland, and Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania; formed for the second charge, which was to commence the advance at the waving of the Second Brigade flag from the reserve post. At the given signal all started with a a yell, fully determined this time to go through, and nothing but the natural obstructions could or did impede our advance, and I take pleasure in saying that the colors of the One hundred and twenty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry were the second planted on the enemy’s works; this, considering the ground over which we charged, is creditable to the color bearer of this regiment (Sergt. Peter Mast).

A list of casualties has already been forwarded.*

The officers and men of the regiment did their parts nobly, and maintained their character as good soldiers of the Second Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army Corps.

Respectfully, yours,

C. M. CORNYN,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

[Captain WILLIAM L. SHAW,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.]

—————

*Shows 1 man killed and 23 men wounded.

—————

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 313

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: