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Ship Information (from DANFS)1,2:

Name: USS Rose Type: Screw Steamer Tonnage: 96
Length: 84’ Beam: 18’2” Draught: Not listed.
Speed: Not Listed. Complement: Not Listed. Class: Not Listed.
Armament: December 31, 1865: 1 20-pounder Parrott rifle, 1 heavy 12-pdr. Smoothbore
Namesake: A flower.

Images:

Image Needed

 

Captain(s):
Captain 1
Captain Image

Captain 2
Captain Image

Captain 3
Captain Image

 

First Offensive Order of Battle (June 13-18, 1864): James River, Va. | North Atlantic Blockading Squadron | Union Navy (June 17, 1864)3

  • Captain:
  • Crew Strength:
  • Armament:
  • Note: On June 17, 1864, this ship is noted as a “tug; temporary torpedo boat, tender and ram to ironclads” and was located “above Wilson’s Wharf” on the James River.4

Second Offensive Order of Battle (June 19-30, 1864):

  • Captain:
  • Crew Strength:
  • Armament:
  • Note: Eutaw, Tecumseh, Tritonia, Pink, Rose, and Althea were ordered to leave the front for Hampton Roads on June 23, 1864. The latter four vessels, all tugs, were to be repaired by Captain Gansevoort prior to being sent on to their destinations.5

Third Offensive Order of Battle (July 1-31, 1864):

  • Captain:
  • Crew Strength:
  • Armament:
  • Note: Rose departed Hampton Roads on July 26, 1864 and arrived in Mississippi Sound on August 5, 186 She would never return to the Siege of Petersburg.6

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle (August 1-31, 1864):

  • Not Present

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle (September 1-October 13, 1864):

  • Not Present

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle (October 14-31, 1864):

  • Not Present

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle (November 1-December 31, 1864):

  • Not Present

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle (January 1-February 28, 1865):

  • Not Present

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle (March 1-April 2, 1865):

  • Not Present

 

Siege of Petersburg Battles:

  • TBD

 

Siege of Petersburg Involvement:7

The wooden screw steamer Ai Fitch was purchased by the Navy on 12 December 1863 from Laurence Fitch, New York; fitted out for service as a tug; and commissioned on 8 February 1864, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Pennington in command.

Ordered to New Orleans to join the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, she departed New York soon after commissioning and proceeded to Hampton Roads where she was detained to support General McClellan’s army during the Peninsular Campaign. On 5 May [1864] she got underway to tow the monitor Tecumseh up the James River to support Army forces converging on Petersburg. Remaining on the river well into June, she performed towing duties, tender services, and carried ammunition and powder up from City Point. On the [June] 24th [1864] she returned to Hampton Roads and prepared to resume her cruise to the Gulf of Mexico.

Rose departed Hampton Roads on 26 July [1864] and arrived in Mississippi Sound on 5 August [1864]…

Rose was struck from the Navy list on 3 March 1883 and sold on 20 September 1883.

 

Bibliography:

    Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

      Sources:

      1. “DANFS.” Naval History and Heritage Command, www.history.navy.mil/content/history/nhhc/research/histories/ship-histories/danfs.html.
      2. Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Series 2, Volume 1, p. 195
      3. Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Volume X, pp. 157158
      4. Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Volume X, pp. 157158
      5. Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 10, p. 197
      6. “Rose I (Screw Steamer).” Naval History and Heritage Command, https://www.history.navy.mil/research/histories/ship-histories/danfs/r/rose-i.html.
      7. “Rose I (Screw Steamer).” Naval History and Heritage Command, https://www.history.navy.mil/research/histories/ship-histories/danfs/r/rose-i.html.

      ***



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