190th Pennsylvania Infantry

   

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Editor’s Note: Do you have information on this unit’s role at the Siege of Petersburg?  Please contact us using the Contact button in the menu at the top of the screen.  We are happy to exchange information with other researchers.

Muster In: Organized in the field from Veterans and Recruits of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps May 31, 1864.1
Muster Out: June 28, 18652

Commander(s):
Bvt. Colonel Joseph B. Pattee
Commander Image

Major John A. Wolff
Commander Image

Captain Richard M. Birkman
Commander Image

Captain Neri B. Kinsey
Commander Image

Captain Peres L. Norton (191st PA)
Commander Image

Commander 6
Commander Image

First Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army3,4

Second Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army9,10

Third Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army15,16

  • Commander: Major John A. Wolff (July 31, 1864)17
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle:

Third Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army (August 1-21, 1864)18,19

First Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army (August 21-31, 1864) 20

  • Commander:
    • ? (August 1-19, 1864)
    • Captain Richard M. Birkman (at least August 19-21, 1864)21
    • Captain Neri B. Kinsey (August 31, 1864)22
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:
  • Note: Was combined with the 191st Pennsylvania after Globe Tavern (exact time needs to be researched) and they acted as a single battalion for the rest of the war.23

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Second Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union24,25

  • Commander: Lieutenant Colonel Joseph B. Pattee (starting from around September 1, 1864)26
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Second Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union27,28

  • Commander: Lieutenant Colonel Joseph B. Pattee (October 31, 1864)29
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Second Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union30,31

  • Commander: Brevet Colonel Joseph B. Pattee (December 31, 1864)32
  • Unit Strength: >400 officers and men present for duty (early November 1864)33
  • Weapons:
  • Note: This regiment participated in Warren’s Stony Creek, or “Apple Jack” Raid to Belfield and Hicksford, Virginia from December 7-12, 1864.34

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Second Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union35,36,37

  • Commander:
    • Captain Richard M. Birkman (190th PA)(January 31, 1865)38
    • Captain Peres L. Norton (191st PA)(January 31, 1865)39
    • Brevet Colonel Joseph B. Pattee (combined regiment)(at least February 5-7 and 28, 1865)40,41
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:
  • Note: This unit is listed in the casualty returns for the Battle of Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865, implying it was present during the Eighth Offensive and the battle.42
  • Note: Were the 190th/191st Pennsylvania combined or weren’t they?  Most of my research indicates they were permanently combined by this point, but the Official Records lists separate commanders for each in January and February 1865.  More research is needed.

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle: Third Brigade | Second Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army43,44

  • Commander: Brevet Colonel Joseph B. Pattee (at least March 31-April 9, 1865)45,46,47,48
  • Unit Strength:
  • Weapons:
  • Note: On March 21, 1865, the 157th Pennsylvania was added to this combined unit.  The three regiments were never formally combined, but acted in the field together as one unit.49,50,51,52

Dyer’s/Sifakis’ Compendium Info:
Siege of Petersburg Battles53:

  • Before Petersburg June 16-18.
  • Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865.
  • Weldon Railroad June 21-23, 1864.
  • Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve).
  • Weldon Railroad August 18-21.
  • Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2.
  • Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run, October 27-28.
  • Warren’s Expedition to Weldon Railroad December 7-12.
  • Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865.
  • Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9.
  • Lewis Farm, near Gravelly Run, March 29.
  • White Oak Road March 31.
  • Five Forks April 1.
  • Appomattox Court House April 9.
  • Surrender of Lee and his army.

Bibliography:

    Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

    Sources:

    1. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    2. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    3. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), p. 225
    4. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    5. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “The evening of the 18th found them on that part of the line near where Fort Haskell was located later, from which the spires of Petersburg were plainly visible, so close to the main works of the enemy that rifle-balls dropped far to their rear. They lost one officer and 20 men killed, nine officers and 85 men wounded. Lieut.-Col. Pattee was severely wounded, and was brevetted Colonel for gallant conduct.”
    6. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 190th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 61; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    7. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 190th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 61; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    8. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 190th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 61; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    9. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), p. 225
    10. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    11. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    12. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 190th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 61; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    13. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 190th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 61; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    14. Volume 14 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 190th Pennsylvania Entry, Page 61; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    15. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 256
    16. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 733
    17. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 3 (Serial Number 82), page 733
    18. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 124: “Return of Casualties in the Union Forces (August 1864)”
    19. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 372: “Special Orders, No. —. Hdqrs. Third Division, Fifth Corps, August 21, 1864. The One hundred and ninetieth and One hundred and ninety-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, heretofore composing the Third Brigade, are hereby transferred to the First Brigade, and the Third Brigade will be discontinued until further orders. By command of Brigadier-General Crawford: GEO. MONTEITH, Assistant Adjutant-General.
    20. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 615: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
    21. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “About 300 men were left from this disaster. Of the officers who escaped were Capt. Birkman…….On the 21st the Reserves assisted in repulsing a stubborn attack of the enemy near the Yellow House, and had a chance to even matters up a little by inflicting heavy loss on their assailants. This was the only time they fought from behind intrenchments, except skirmish-pits. Capt. Birkman was in command.”
    22. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 2 (Serial Number 88), page 615: “Organization of the Army of the Potomac…August 31, 1864”
    23. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “Lieut.-Col. Pattee, though still suffering from the wound received June 18, and also one received May 30, returned about Sept. 1 and took command of the two regiments, which acted as a single battalion from this time till the close of the war.”
    24. Sommers, Richard J. “Grant’s Fifth Offensive at Petersburg: A Study in Strategy, Tactics, and Generalship.  The Battle of Poplar Spring Church, the First Battle of the Darbytown Road, the Second Battle of the Squirrel Level Road, the Second Battle of the Darbytown Road (Ulysses S. Grant, Virginia).” Doctoral Thesis. Rice University, 1970. Print. p. 1300.
    25. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 140: “Return of Casualties in the Union Forces (September-October 1864)”
    26. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “Lieut.-Col. Pattee, though still suffering from the wound received June 18, and also one received May 30, returned about Sept. 1 and took command of the two regiments, which acted as a single battalion from this time till the close of the war.”
    27. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 461: “Organization of the Union Forces” (October 31, 1864)”
    28. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 156: “Return of Casualties in the Union Forces…Boydton Plank Road, Va., October 27-28, 1864”: This source lists the units separately.
    29. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 461: “Organization of the Union Forces” (October 31, 1864)”
    30. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 1118: “Organization of the Union Forces” (December 31, 1864)
    31. Calkins, Chris. “The Apple Jack Raid: For This Barbarism There Was No Real Excuse.” Blue & Gray Magazine Summer 2005: 18-25 (OOB on page 60).
    32. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 3 (Serial Number 89), page 1118: “Organization of the Union Forces” (December 31, 1864)
    33. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “This was the year of the Presidential-election, and the Pennsylvania soldiers voted. The ballot of the Reserves was as follows: Lincoln, 272; McClellan, 125. Total, 397. On the somewhat violent supposition that none of the boys who were under the legal age did any of the voting, the command must have numbered well beyond 400 at this date.”
    34. Calkins, Chris. “The Apple Jack Raid: For This Barbarism There Was No Real Excuse.” Blue & Gray Magazine Summer 2005: 18-25 (OOB on page 60).
    35. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 328: “Organization of the Union Forces” (January 31, 1865)
    36. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 742: “Organization of the Union Forces” (February 28, 1865)
    37. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 96), page 66: “Return of Casualties in the Union forces at Hatcher’s Run (otherwise known as Dabney’s Mill, Armstrong’s Mill, Rowanty Creek, and Vaughan Road)… (February 5-7, 1865)”
    38. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 328: “Organization of the Union Forces” (January 31, 1865)
    39. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 328: “Organization of the Union Forces” (January 31, 1865)
    40. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “The Reserves, under Pattee, came up at a double-quick, and when about opposite the Perkins buildings were ordered to file right and deploy skirmishers. ”
    41. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 2 (Serial Number 96), page 742: “Organization of the Union Forces” (February 28, 1865)
    42. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 96), page 66: “Return of Casualties in the Union forces at Hatcher’s Run (otherwise known as Dabney’s Mill, Armstrong’s Mill, Rowanty Creek, and Vaughan Road)… (February 5-7, 1865)”
    43. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 570: “Organization of the Union Forces” (March 31, 1865)
    44. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 585: “Return of casualties in the Union Forces commanded by Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, March 29-April 9, 1865”
    45. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 570: “Organization of the Union Forces” (March 31, 1865)
    46. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “About 10 a. m. on the 31st the Reserves were relieved by men of the Third Division, and moved toward the left to rejoin the brigade. Before this was accomplished the flank and rear attack began. Col. Pattee promptly grasped the situation. He halted his command and brought it to a front, thus facing toward the picket-pits which his men had held the past 21 hours.”
    47. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “At 1 p. m. Gen. Sheridan gave the order for the corps to be brought forward and formed for the attack. The Second Division, on the left of the Third, was formed near the Methodist Church; the Third Brigade on the right, the Second on the left, the first in reserve close behind the others. Of the Third Brigade, the 4th Del., Capt. W. H. Mc Cleary, was on the left; next was the 3d Del., Capt. J. H. Cade; then the 191st Pa., Capt. Perez L. Norton, and the 157th Pa., Maj. E. T. Tiers. This whole line was under command of Lieut.-Co. L J. B. Pattee, of the 190th Pa. The 190th Pa. was deployed as skirmishers, under Capt. R. M. Birkman. The 210th Pa., Lieut.-Col. E. L. Whitman, formed the second line of the brigade, their right reaching to the road leading north past the church, and a little south of the church.”
    48. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “Gen. Ayres, who was-in advance, led his division to the sound of the firing. Pattee’s command was at the rear of the division. Gen. Ayres ordered him forward to skirmish, while he formed the rest of the division in two lines-of-battle.”
    49.  A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    50. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “The 157th Pa. was added to Col. Pattee’s command in the latter part of March, giving him in all about 500 men. The three fragments were never actually consolidated, but acted together as a regimental unit.”
    51. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), page 570: “Organization of the Union Forces” (March 31, 1865)
    52. McBride, R. E. “Pennsylvania Reserves. Career of These Veterans from Cold Harbor to Appomattox.” National Tribune 10 November 1898. 1:1-6 and 2:3-4: “The 157th Pa. was added to Col. Pattee’s command in the latter part of March, giving him in all about 500 men. The three fragments were never actually consolidated, but acted together as a regimental unit.”
    53. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)

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