13th Massachusetts Infantry

   

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in Massachusetts Infantry

Editor’s Note: Do you have information on this unit’s role at the Siege of Petersburg?  Please contact us using the Contact button in the menu at the top of the screen.  We are happy to exchange information with other researchers.

Muster In: Organized at Fort Independence June 16, 1861.1
Muster Out: August 1, 18642

Commander(s):
Major Elliot C. Pierce
Commander Image

Commander 2
Commander Image

Commander 3
Commander Image

First Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army3,4

Second Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army7,8

Third Offensive Order of Battle: First Brigade | Third Division | V Corps | Army of the Potomac | Union Army (July 1-13, 1864)13

  • Commander: Major Elliot C. Pierce (July 15, 1864)14
  • Unit Strength: 80 officers and men PFD (July 14, 1864)15
  • Weapons:
  • Note: Left the front lines on the evening of July 14.16  Enlisted men whose terms of service had not expired were transferred to the 39th Massachusetts on July 13. 17,18,.19

Fourth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Was no longer in existence.20

Fifth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Was no longer in existence.21

Sixth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Was no longer in existence.22

Seventh Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Was no longer in existence.23

Eighth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Was no longer in existence.24

Ninth Offensive Order of Battle:

  • Was no longer in existence.25

Dyer’s/Sifakis’ Compendium Info:
Siege of Petersburg Battles1:

  • Before Petersburg June 16-18.
  • Siege of Petersburg June 16-July 14.
  • Mustered out August 1, 1864.

Bibliography:

    Siege of Petersburg Documents Which Mention This Unit:

    Links

    Sources:

    1. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    2. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    3. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), p. 224
    4. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    5. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    6. Volume 13 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 13th Massachusetts Entry, Page 83; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    7. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), p. 224
    8. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    9. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 2 (Serial Number 81), p. 546
    10. Pierce, Elliot C. June 18, 1864 Diary Entry. Unknown Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society: Pierce mentions Colonel Leonard was sick in the hospital.  Brad Forbush provided his transcription of the diary.  Brad runs the 13th Massachusetts web site and also blogs about the 13th Massachusetts: “6/18:  Went to Burnsides’s left and by 9A.M.  moved forward in line of battle after skirmishing the Enemy withdraw towards Petersburg full two miles during the day.  13th Mass. detailed as Picket.  Our pits were 200 yards from the enemy.  Colonel Leonard sick at hospital.”
    11. Pierce, Elliot C. June 20, 1864 Diary Entry. Unknown Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society: Pierce mentions that he went back to see Lt. Colonel Hovey in the hospital, and that the Hovey intended to leave for Washington the next day.  Peirce does not mention Hovey in the week prior in his diary, so presumably Pierce was in command the entire time the regiment was at the Siege of Petersburg.  Brad Forbush provided his transcription of the diary.  Brad runs the 13th Massachusetts web site and also blogs about the 13th Massachusetts: “6/20:  (Lay?)(Are?)  quiet and very low in the works.  Fire pretty warm.  I went back to see Lt. Col. Hovey at Hospital.  He expects to leave tomorrow for Washington.  His leg is bad.  About 11 p.m. ordered to report to Col. Carle of Pa. Res.  (Pennsylvania Reserves) We cross railroad and form on left joining Cutler’s Division. We are in Pits.”
    12. Volume 13 (Ordnance Returns for the Second Quarter, April-June, 1864); 13th Massachusetts Entry, Page 83; Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-1867, 1870-1876. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1281, Roll 7); Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 1797-1969, Record Group 156; National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
    13. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 256
    14. Pierce, Elliot C. July 15, 1864 Report on the Number of Officers and Enlisted Men ready to go home. Unknown Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society: Pierce sigsn the report as “Major Commanding.”  This item was provided by Brad Forbush as an addendum to his transcription of Elliot’s diary for 1864.  Brad runs the 13th Massachusetts web site and also blogs about the 13th Massachusetts.
    15. 13th Mass History 1864. Forbush, Brad. 2008. 29 September 2012 <http://www.13thmass.org/1864/1864.html>. Siege of Petersburg June 16th – July 14th, 1864: “July 14th  – Time is up, Finally!  80 men leave the trenches in the front lines and move to the rear.  The officers had been busy all night updating the regimental books.  All day the men are joined by old comrades who have been away on detached duty.  At 6:00 P.M. they start stepping lightly to City Point 5 miles away, singing the old songs with a joy they hadn’t felt in months.  They reach the river at 1 A.M.”
    16. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    17. Davis, Charles E., Jr. Three Years in the Army: The Story of the Thirteenth Massachusetts Volunteers from July 16, 1861 to August 1, 1864 (Estes and Lauriat: 1894), p. 379: “No. 69. / Headquarters Fifth Army Corps,  July 13, 1864.  (Extract.)  4. The officers and enlisted men of the Thirteenth Massachusetts Volunteers whose term of service expires on the 16th instant will proceed on that date to Massachusetts and report to the General Superintendent of recruiting service for that State for muster-out and discharge.  The Assistant Commissionary of Muster of the Third Division will accompany the command to the place of embarkation and see that no officers or enlisted men leave the army except those entitled to discharge by reason of expiration of time.  5. The enlisted men of the Thirteenth Massachusetts Volunteers whose term of service does not expire on the 16th instant will be transferred to the Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers. Their late officers will not be permitted to leave the army until they have furnished the descriptive lists and necessary transfer papers of the men so transferred.  By command of  MAJOR-GENERAL WARREN.”
    18. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 256
    19. Vautier, John D. History of the 88th Pennsylvania Volunteers in the War for the Union, 1861-1865. Philadelphia: Printed by J.B. Lippincott, 1894, p. 196: “The 13th Massachusetts, another gallant regiment that had been closely identified with our brigade, went home on the (July?) 14th, its three years arduous service having expired.”
    20. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    21. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    22. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    23. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    24. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    25. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)
    26. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer (Part 3)

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