Number 73. Siege of Petersburg Report of Lieutenant Colonel Nathan H. Vincent, Eighty-sixth New York Infantry, of operations March 25

   

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in Siege of Petersburg Reports (95)

No. 73. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Nathan H. Vincent, Eighty-sixth New York Infantry, of operations March 25.1

HDQRS. EIGHTY-SIXTH Regiment NEW YORK VETERAN VOLS.,
Near Hatcher’s Run, Va., March 26, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my command in the action of yesterday:

At about 4 p.m. I left the breast-works, following the First Maine Heavy Artillery, and moved to the front passing, the old picket-line near the reserve of the First Brigade, to the road between our line and the rebels. Before my regiment had got fairly across the swamp, the enemy opened a brisk fire of musketry from ahead and commenced shelling from the right, when, by direction of the general commanding brigade, I moved my regiment by the rear rank to the right of the road, swinging to the left, in order to keep the connection, and moved forward to the edge of the woods, halting within about sixty yards of the rebels’ old line of picket-pits, and commenced constructing defenses. After remaining a short time I advanced to the pits, connecting with the First Maine Heavy Artillery on the left, and the Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers on the right. After remaining in this position a short time the enemy advanced and took possession of the line of picket-pits one the left, and commenced a sharp fire on my flank and rear. At

the same time the forces on the right fell back into the woods, leaving both my flanks exposed, when I was obliged to fall back into the woods to make the connection, where I immediately reformed and placed my regiment on the line, connecting with the First Maine Heavy Artillery on the left, and the Fortieth New York Veteran Volunteers on the right. At about 8 p.m., the First Maine Heavy Artillery having been relieved, I moved to the left and occupied their works, connecting with the One hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers. After remaining there about two hours, most of the time under a sharp fire, was relieved, and returned to camp.

My losses during the engagement were, 2 first lieutenants wounded severely, 1 captain, slightly; 1 enlisted man killed, and 6 wounded.

I am, very respectfully,

N. H. VINCENT,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

Captain J. M. LINNARD,
Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade.

Sources:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pages 232-233

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