Number 4. Siege of Petersburg Itineraries of the Army of the Potomac, Sheridan’s Cavalry Command, and the Army of the James (January-April 1865)

   

0 comments

in Siege of Petersburg Reports (95)

No. 4. Itineraries of the Army of the Potomac, Sheridan’s Cavalry Command, and the Army of the James.*1

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

Engineer Brigade.

January 7.-Lieutenant O’Keefe, with 150 men of the Fifteenth [New York] Engineers, embarked on steamer George Chase, with engineering and siege material, for Fort Fisher.

January 22.-Company I, Fiftieth [New York] Engineers, Captain Folwell, left for Major-General Sherdian’s army.

January 29.-Companies B and D, Fifteenth Engineers, started, with 620 feet of bridging, animals, &c., on transports for the South; destination unknown.

Troops engaged in drill and work on the fortifications around City Point.

February 5.-A train of thirty boasts arrived from Washington. The whole command, 1,900 strong-composed of the Fifteenth New York Volunteers Engineers, Sixty-first Massachusetts Volunteers (leaving the pickets on Bailey’s Creek), Eighteenth New Hampshire, First Maine Sharpshooters (two companies), and Michigan Sharpshooters-started, via railroad, for the front, at about 5 p. m., with orders to report ot Major-General Parke, commanding Ninth Corps. Bivouacked near the Avery house.

February 6.-Received orders from General Parke to move the brigade up to the Aiken house. The troops of the command occupied the line between Batteries Numbers 24 and 26, the right resting on Battery 24; headquarters of the brigade in rear of Fort Howard. A detail of 187 men from Engineer Brigade relieved the First Division, Sixth Corps, from picket duty.

February 7.-Troops under arms at 5 a. m. until 8 a.m.

February 8.-The Fifteenth Engineers and Michigan Sharpshooters occupied that portion of the line between Battery 24 and the marsh; the Eighteenth New Hampshire and Sixty-first Massachusetts, battery 25 (Fort Howard). Three hundred and eight men on picket duty.

February 9.-The command occupied the line from Battery 24 to Fort Howard, doing the picket duty.

February 10.-Troops in same position as yesterday.

February 11.-The Engineer Brigade relieved this morning by General Griffin’s troops of the Ninth Corps, and ordered to return to City Point and occupy their old camp at that place. Column started at about 10 a. m., reaching City Point during the afternoon.

February 12 to 15.-Troops occupied in drill, camp duty, and work on fortifications.

February 15.-General Benham returned from duty in New York.

February 16.-A raft of thirty-two boats received from Captain Lubey at Deep Bottom, being part of the bridge at Aiken’s Landing-replaced by a pile bridge.

February 16 to 28.-troops occupied in drill, camp duty, and work on fortifications of City Point.

March 12.-Hall’s Independent Battalion Sharpshooters, Michigan Volunteers, ordered to report to headquarters Ninth Corps, with a view of being consolidated with the First Michigan Sharpshooters; started via railroad same day.

—————

*From returns of the commands indicated for January, February, March, April, May, and June, 1865.

—————

March 17.-The Eighteenth New Hampshire Volunteers ordered to report to commanding officer Ninth Corps, to be consolidated with another regiment from the same State. The First Maine Sharpshooters ordered to the Fifth Corps, to be consolidated with another regiment from same State. The Sixty-first Massachusetts Volunteers ordered to report to General Collis, commanding post. General Benahm to hold the outer defenses City Point with the Fifteenth Engineers.

March 18.-The Sixty-first Massachusetts Volunteers relieved from picket duty on Bailey’s Creek by the Fifteenth Engineers, and moved camp to City Point.

March 24.-Captain Lubey, with Company C, Fifteenth Engineers, arrived at City Point from Deep Bottom, having been relieved from duty with pontoon bridges on the James River.

March 25.-Captain Dibbell, Fifteenth Engineers, with his company, ordered to the fortifications from this camp. The troops ordered out to meet an anticipated attack from the enemy. Captain Farr, assistant quartermaster, reported for duty. Captain T. Lubey, Fifteenth Engineers, with his company and a raft of twenty-four boats, started, via river, at 11 p. m., for the purpose of laying a bridge across the James River at Deep Bottom, below Four-Mile Creek.

March 26.-Captain Lubey completed his bridge across the James at 6.30 a. m. At 6 p. m. General Sheridan’s command had cross to the south side of the river.

March 27.-Captain Lubey, with his company and brigade, returned to City Point at 3 p. m.

March 29.-At 10 p. m. the whole command, including the four regiments of General Collins’ brigade, ordered to the defenses of City Point at 3 p. m.

March 29.-At 10 p. m. the whole command, including the four regiments of General Collis’ brigade, ordered to the defense of City Point to meet an expected emergency.

March 30.-Troops returned to camp at daylight.

April 1.-Engineer Brigade in camp at City Point, Va.

April 2.-Moved the command, composed of the Fifteenth New York Engineers, Sixty-first Massachusetts, Sixty-eighth and One hundred and fourteenth Pennsylvania, and Twentieth [Eightieth] New York Volunteers, and dismounted cavalry, and reported to General Parke, commanding Ninth Corps, the brigade of infantry being ordered up under Colonel Tippin, Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania, as General Collis could not be found. Reached Fort Rice between 1 and 2 p. m., and all but the Fifteenth New York Engineers were almost immediately ordered to charge the enemy’s works, which they did at the most critical moment, thereby saving the works of the enemy from recapture.

May 1.-The brigade having completed its duties at Roanoke Station in repairing the Richmond and Danville Railroad bridge across the Staunton River, Borke camp and moved toward Manchester. Marched to Keysville and bivouacked for the night.

May 2.-Reached Burkeville Junction this p. m.

May 3.-Troops sent via Amelia Court-House, and general commanding took the cars for City Point, with a detachment of the Fiftieth, to ship the engineer material at that place to Washington.

May 5.-Troops reached Manchester; passed in review through Richmond. Troops ordered to march overland to Alexandria, under command of Colonel Brainerd. The general commanding went to

Washington, by may of City Point, to complete the arrangements for shipping pontoon and siege material.

May 7.-Headquarters of the brigade reached Washington.

May 12.-The Fifteenth Regiment reached Alexandria.

May 16.-Headquarters of the brigade moved to near Fort Berry, Va.

May 21.-The Fiftieth Regiment arrived, having been delayed in constructing the necessary bridges on the route.

May 25.-Participated in the grand review through Washington.

Remained in camp at Fort Berry, Va. (about four miles from Washington), the remainder of the month, making preparations for the muster-out of a portion of the volunteer troops. The engineer trains and pontoon property were turned in to the proper department at Washington.

June 4.-Received special orders to muster out all the volunteer troops in the Engineers Brigade.

Siege Train.

Captain B. P. Learned returned from absence with leave on April 5, and joined company on the 6th.

Captain J. M. Twiss absent on thirty days’ leave since April 17, Special Orders, Numbers 97, headquarters Department of Virginia, April 10.

Upon the movement of the Army of the Potomac six companies of the First Connecticut Artillery were assigned to the command of Major-

General Parke, commanding Ninth Corps, and were engaged in the action of April 2 before Petersburg.

Since the capture of Richmond and Petersburg the entire command has been engaged in shipping the siege train and dismantling the rebel works before Richmond and Petersburg.

SECOND ARMY CORPS.

January.-No changes in the disposition of the troops of this command during the month.

February 5.-7 a. m., the Second and Third Divisions, with Battery K, Fourth U. S. Artillery,. and the Tenth Massachusetts Battery, advanced to the crossing of Hatcher’s run, on the Vaughan road, and ant Armstrong’s Mill. The enemy in small force were driven across the run at 9.30 a.m. by the skirmishers of the First Brigade, Third Division. The First and Second Brigades, Third Division, took position on the south side of the run, while the Third Brigade took position in the vicinity of the tucker house, [near] the Vaughan road; the Second Division was posted with its left on the run and the right near Armstrong’s Mill. At 5.15 p. m. the enemy in strong force attacked the right at Smyth’s division and the left of Mcallister’s (Third) brigade, Third Division, and were finally repulsed, the action having been continued until after 7 p. m. Fourth Brigade, First Division, was formed in line at 4.30 p. m., near the Tucker house, to relieve McAllister’s right, the First, Second, and Third Brigades of First Division remaining in charge of the old line of entrenchments.

February 6.-Reconnaissances were sent out by the Third Division without finding any forces except the enemy’s pickets, who were driven inside their main line of works. At the same time all three divisions of the corps were held in readiness to attack the enemy if found outside his works.

February 11.-The Second Division was assigned a position on the new line of works along Hatcher’s Run, which position the corps now [

February 28] holds, with headquarters near the site of the Wilkinson house.

March 1 to 25.-In camp, as last return.

March 25.-Enemy broke through at Fort Stedman on Ninth Corps front. The Second and Third Divisions of the corps, in afternoon, attacked enemy’s entrenched picket-line, capturing it with many prisoners.

March 26 to 29.-In camp.

March 29.-Broke camp at 6 a.m.; crossed Hatcher’s Run at Vaughan road; formed line, with right resting on run at Vaughan crossing, and left connecting with right of Fifth Corps, near the Quaker road. Fifth Corps attacked by the enemy on the Quaker road.

March 30.-Troops advanced; connecting on the right with a division of the Twenty-fourth Corps, and on the left with Fifth Corps. Line formed, with right resting at Crow house, and left on the Boydton road, near the Mrs. Rainey house. Skirmishing with enemy all day.

March 31.-Relieved part of the line held by the Fifth Corps on the left of the Boydton roads. Miles’ division sent in the assist the Fifth Corps, and captured one color. Skirmishing by the Second and Third Divisions. Miles sent to report to General Sheridan. Line formed, with right resting at Mrs. Butler’s, on Boydton road, and left at Crow house.

April 1.-The left of the line of the corps rested on Gravelly Run. At dusk the First Division moved to make a connection with General Sheridan, the remainder of the corps connecting with Miles by men in single rank with intervals. Our left now rests near the Claiborne and White Oak roads. A great deal of skirmishing during the night. The front of the Crow house at daylight; afterward order countermanded.

April 2.-The enemy evacuate their works in our front at 9 o’clock. Received news from the Second Division that they had carried the redoubt near Crow house, taking 280 prisoners and 3 guns. Miles’ division returns from Sheridan, strikes the enemy on Claiborne road and follows them, and at 3 o’clock attacks their position near Sutherland’s Station; drives them out, taking 2 guns, 400 prisoners, and 1 battle-flag. Second and Third Divisions follow the Boydton plank road, crossing Hatcher’s Run, and take position within one mile and a half of Petersburg. General Humphreys takes the Second Division and moves down the Cox road to relieve Miles, who reported the enemy too strong. Upon the arrived of the Second Division Miles is found all right.

April 3.-Corps again together, and moves on River and Namozine roads to Nomozine Church.

April 14.-Marched down Namozine road and encamped near Deep Creek.

April 15.- Left camp at 1.30 a.m., with slow progress, on account of the cavalry occupying the road. Issued rations and resumed the march, passing through Dennisville, and reached the Richmond and Danville Railroad at Jetersville Station. Hatled in line of battle with two divisions, First and Second, on left of Fifth Corps, with

Third on the right, which was afterward relieved by Sixth Corps, and was placed on the left of the corps.

April 6.-Moved at 6.30 in direction of Amelia Court-House, in three columns, with deploying distance-Second Division on right, First in center, Third on left. At 9 o’clock discovered the enemy moving past Amelia Sulpher Springs. 9.30 o’clock Mott’s division moved down the Jetersville and Deatonsville road; cross Flat Creek and skirmish with their rear guard. At Deatonsville they made a stand; we charged and

drove them 2 p.m. At 4.40 o’clock connected with Sixth Corps and moved down the Farmville road to Sailor’s Creek, where the enemy made a stand; drove them, taking 250 wagons, 75 ambulances, several battle-flags, and between 600 and 700 prisoners. The enemy’s route was strewn with wagons, camp and garrison equipage. The enemy’s route was strewn with wagons, camp and garrison equipage. General Barlow reported early in the morning and was assigned to the command of the Second Division.

April 7.-Marched to High Bridge and found the enemy on the high ground on other side of Appomattox River in line of battle; they retired and we followed. The bridge was set on fire, but was saved. The corps captured 18 guns and 400 prisoners. Barlow moved down the railroad, and First and Third [Divisions] took a road two miles from the bridge, turning to the right, leading to the Farmville and Lynchburg stage road, striking it some miles above Farmville. Here the enemy was found in strong force, and we failed to find their flank, so no attack was ordered. Barlow forced them and destroyed 150 wagons. General Smyth, commanding Third Brigade, Second Division, was mortally wounded.

April 8.-Left capt at 7 a. m.; marched down the Farmville and Lynchburg stage road one mile and a half toward the right, on the road leading to Buckingham Court-House. At Coalpit turned to the right and marched on a road running parallel to plank road, and marched through New Store. Rested two hours and a half. Received orders to march until we had the enemy on our immediate front. Left at 9.30 o’clock; marched until 12.30 o’clock. The men were so exhausted for want of smothering to eat that a halt was ordered; went into camp and rations were issued.

April 9.-Left camp at 9 o’clock and marched to within five miles of Appomattox Court-House halted. At 4 o’clock received new that General Lee had surrendered his army.

April, 10.-Remained quiet.

April 11.-Left camp at 10.30 o’clock; marched to New Store, and encamped for the night.

April 12.-Left camp at 6.30 o’clock; marched one mile and a half; struck plank road; marched through Curdsville; crossed Little Willis River, passing through Farmville; encamped near Bush River.

April 13.-Left camp at 8 o’clock; moved to burkeville. Remained at Burkeville during the remainder of the month.

May 1.-At burkeville.

May 2.-Moved from Jetersville, via Amelia Court-House, across the Appomattox at Goode’s Bridge.

May 4.-Moved from Goode’s Bridge to Two-Mile Creek, five miles from Richmond.

May 5.-Moved to Manchester.

May 6.-Moved through Richmond by Brook road to Brook Creek.

May 7.-Moved across Chickahominy at Winston’s Bridge via Hanover Court-House; across Pamunkey at Littlepage’s Bridge.

May 8.-Moved pass Concord Church, Chesterfield Station, Old Chesterfield, Mount Carmel Church, by telegraph road, to vicinity of Golansville.

May 9.-Moved by telegraph road across Pole-Cat, Mat, Ta, Po, and Ny to Massaponax Church.

May 10.-Moved through Fredericksburg across Rappahannock; passed Washington, Oder’s, Cockley Store, to Old Tavern.

May 11.-Passed Tusculum to Middle Run.

May 12.-Marched to vicinity of Wolf Run Shoals, on Occoquan.

May 13.-Marched ot Bailey’s Cross-roads and encamped, remaining here during the rest of the month.

[June.]-No change of station during the month.

First Division.

February 5.-The Fourth Brigade of this division was ordered to Hatcher’s Run, and formed in line on the right of the Third Division.

February 9.-It returned, not having been engaged. On the same day the division moved to the left, its right resting at Fort Gregg, its left at the chimneys of the Westermoreland house, and threw up a line of works.

[March 25.]-The division remained in camp in the breast-works, near Squirrel Level road, until the morning of this date, when attacking parties were sent out form the First and Fourth Brigades to occupy the enemy’s picket-line. This was done, and the movement was followed by the advance of the entire command to the new position gained. During the afternoon three determined attacks were repulsed. A strong picket-line was left upon the ground occupied, when the division returned to its formed camp behind the entrenchments.

March 20.-The division marched by the left flank across Hatchers’ Run, and formed line on the left of the Third Division. Advanced in line to Dabney’s Mill road the next day, with the left resting at the Boydton plank road.

March 31.-Moved to the left, relieving the Fifth Corps from the position held by them. At 12.30 p. m. the division advanced to the relief of the Fifth Corps, then engaged with the enemy. The Third and Fourth Brigades, striking the rebels in flank and driving them to their session of the White Oak road. Subsequently moved to the right, entrenched the line, and bivouacked.

First Brigade, First Division.

February.-This brigade broke camp on the morning of the 9th, and moved about one mile and a half to the left, in the direction of Hatcher’s Run, to a new position, which we [have] since occupied.

March 9.-This brigade was reviewed by Brevet Major-General Miles,with the rest of the division.

March 23.-This brigade was reviewed, with the rest of the corps, by Major-General Humphreys.

March 25.-At 6 a. m. this brigade was ordered to be ready to move. Two hundred men of the Sixty-first New York Volunteers marched out of our entrenchments, with orders to attack the enemy’s picket-line and break it if possible. They made the attack, but were repulsed, with a small loss, owing to the dense undergrowth and swamp in their front. They then moved half a mile to the left and renewed to assault, driving the enemy from their strong entrenched picket-line and holding the same. The brigade now moved out to their support and was deployed on the line. The enemy made two different assaults to regain their lost position, but were each time handsomely repulsed. At 12 midnight the brigade was withdrawn, and returned to camp.

March 29.-At 6 a. m. the brigade moved down the Vaughan road, crossing Hatcher’s Run, and bivouacked about five miles from the run, near Brown house.

March 30.-We advanced our line a short distance.

March 31.-We crossed the Boydton road, relieving part of the Fifth Corps, and became heavily engaged with the enemy, though with comparatively small loss.

April 1.-The brigade, with the division, moved at 4.30 p. m. from a position near the junction of the White Oak and Boydton roads, and rested near the Butler house until 5 p. m., when we advanced, struck the quarter road, marching down the same about two miles, and bivouacked.

April 2.-The brigade moved at 7 a. m. Were then ordered back, on intimation that the enemy were evacuating their main works. marched through them, following the retreating enemy, and found them in temporary works near Sutherland’s Station, South Side Railroad. Charged them and captured about 600 prisoners, and bivouacked near that place.

April 3 to 5.-Continued the pursuit of the fleeing enemy on the Namozine road, and bivouacked near the Danville railroad at 8 p. m. April 5, marching about twenty-four miles.

April 6.-Moved at 5 a. m. toward Amelia Court-House. At 10 a. m. observed the enemy’s wagon train, and advanced rapidly in pursuit, chasing them all day. At 5 p. m. the brigade charged, making large captures in prisoners, artillery, wagons, horses, flags, &c., and bivouacked near Monkey Run.

April 7.-Moved at 6 a. m.; crossed the Appomattox River at High Bridge; found the enemy in light works near Cumberland Church. The brigade was ordered to charge them at 5 p. m., but were repulsed, on account of overwhelming numbers, losing heavily in officers and men.

April 8.-Continued the pursuit of the retreading enemy, marching down the Lynchburg road about sixteen miles; bivouacked at 11 p. m. April 9.-At daylight resumed the pursuit of the fleeing enemy. At 11 a. m. came upon the enemy’s pickets. The brigade was halted and formed in line, awaiting negotiations of peace. At 2 p. m. again advanced a short distance, but were again halted. At 4 p. m. the welcome news of the surrender of Lee’s entire army was announced to the troops.

April 11.-The division moved at 10 a. m. (except this brigade, which remained to guard the surrendered and captured ordnance and ordnance stores) to Burkeville Station. Remained there until 6.30 on the morning of April 13.

April 13.-We moved up the old Lynchburg road, the train arriving at New Store at 6 p. m.

April 14.-Moved at 7.30 a. m. with the train, and arrived at Farmville, Va., at 5 p. m., and bivouacked two miles from that place.

April 15.-Marched at 7 a. m. to Burkeville Station; joined the division about 5 p. m., and went into camp.

April 17.-Colonel John Fraser, One hundred and fortieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assumed command of the brigade, relieving Colonel G. W. Scott, Sixty-first New York Volunteers.

April 18.-Broke camp and moved about one mile and a half, and went into camp near the Agnew house, where we still remain (May 1).

May 1.-In camp near Burkeville Station, Va.

May 2.-Received orders to march at 1 p. m. by direct route to Manchester.

May 5.-Arrived there at 10 a. m.

May 6.-Took up our line of march for Fredericksburg, passing through Richmond and halting about seven miles from the city for the night, near the branch of the Chickahominy River.

May 7.-Marched about twenty miles, crossing the Pamunkey River,and encamped near it for the night.

May 8.-On the march; crossed the Pole-Cat River, and encamped about seven miles from it for the night.

May 9.-On the march; crossed the Mat, Po, and Ta Rivers, and encamped for the night near the old battle-ground, Spotsylvania.

May 10.-Passed through Fredericksburg, crossing the Potomac Creek, and encamped near it for the night.

May 11 and 12.-On the march, nothing of importance occurring during the day.

May 13.-Crossed the Occoquan Creek at Wolf Run Shoals, and crossing the Orange and alexandria Railroad at Burke’s Station, encamped for the night near Mason’s Hill, about seven miles from Alexandria, and remaining encamped until the morning of the 15th.

May 15.-Marched about four miles, and encamped near Fourth-Mile Run, where we still remain.

May 23.-Participated in grand review of the Army of the Potomac at Washington.

May 31.-took part in the review of the Second Army Corps at Ball’s Cross-Roads, and remain still encamped, with the division, at Fort-Mile Run.

Second Brigade, First Division.

February.-Remained in camp employed in drill, and furnished various details until the 9th; then, from orders from division headquarters, moved camp to the left about two miles, and established in rear of First, Third, and Fourth Brigades. Since then remained in camp furnishing ordinary details. Regimental and brigade drill have been held when weather and circumstances would permit.

[March.]-The brigade remained in camp, furnishing details for picket, &c.; also employed in drill and military instruction until the 25th instant, when it broke camp and advanced, capturing the picket-lines of the enemy, who made repeated attempts to regain it, but were handsomely repulsed. The action lasted about three hours, when the brigade was relieved by a portion of the Fifth corps and was ordered to return to camp. The losses in the action were 16th enlisted men killed, 7 commissioning; total, 178.

The brigade remained in camp until the 29th instant, when it broke camp and marched, with the division, to the left, across Hatcher’s Run and toward the South Side Railroad, occasionally skirmishing with the enemy.

March 31.-Still continuing the advance.

[April.]-This brigade took a prominent part in the campaign, being in the charge at Sutherland’s Station and in the advance through the entire campaign, capturing many prisoners, 2 battle-flags, and losing in killed, wounded, and missing 147 men.

April 11.-Joined the division in the march to Burkewille, where it remains [April 30], engaged in drill and military instruction.

Third Brigade, First Division.

March 29.-Broke camp, crossed Hatcher’s Run, formed in line of battle; One hundred and twenty-sixth [New York] deployed as skirmishers.

March 30.-Resumed march in line of battle; One hundred and eleventh [New York] relieved the One hundred and twenty-sixth as skirmishers at 11 a. m. At noon met the enemy, drove them across Boydton plank road; line of battle advanced to within view of the enemy; constructed breast-work and bivouacked.

March 31.-Changed positions at about 1 p. m.; advanced, charged the enemy with much enthusiasm, driving [him] in confusion; captured one battle-flag and many prisoners.

April 1.-Changed position at 11 p. m.; the One hundred and eleventh ordered to reconnoiter and find if an assault on the enemy’s works were practicable; found it doubtful, and withdrew; marched to the left until 4 a. m. April 2; rested.

April 1.-Changed position at 11 p. m.; the One hundred and eleventh ordered to reconnoiter and find if an assault on the enemy’s works were practicable; found it doubtful, and withdrew; marched to the left until 4 a. m. April 2; rested.

April 2.-Returned three miles; again advanced and found the enemy; advanced under a fire of artillery and musketry; the enemy falling back before our skirmishers. Continued march toward South Side Railroad, driving the enemy, causing them to destroy caissons, baggage, &c. Again found the enemy in strong position; charged their works, and [were] repulsed. General Madill wounded, and sent to the rear. General MacDougall assumed command; a second charge ordered; again repulsed. General MacDougall wounded, but retained command. Artillery placed in position; enemy leave the works; follow in pursuit and take possession of railroad.

April 3.-Continued the pursuit.

April 4.-Repairing roads.

April 5.-Assisting the advance of train and artillery.

April 6.-Continued attacks on enemy’s rear; charged on a battery which covered the retreat of the enemy’s train. Captured some prisoners, drove the enemy, captured 140 wagons, and bivouacked.

April. 7.-Moved in view of High Bridge; found the enemy strongly entrenched; Thirty-ninth and Fifty-second [New York] deployed as skirmished: drove the enemy; advanced across the river; took up line of march toward Farmville; found the enemy again in position; bivouacked.

April 8.-Enemy evacuated during the night. Continued the advance; One hundred and eleventh; One hundred and twenty-fifth, and One hundred and twenty-sixth as skirmishers.

April 9.-Received the news of General Lee’s surrender, which was received with great enthusiasm. Returned [11th] by way of Farmville, with banners flying, to our present position near Burkeville Junction, Va.

May 2.-The brigade broke camp with the corps near Burkeville Station, Va., and moved over the direct route to Manchester, Va.

May 5.-Arrived at that place about noon, resting one day.

May 6.-The command moved across the James River in the morning, passing through Richmond, and encamping for the night near Yellow Tavern, from which point, after marching easy marches of from fourteen to eighteen miles a day, moving by way of Fredericksburg, Va., the column arrived opposite Washington, D. C., on the afternoon of the 13th, and the command went into permanent camp near Bailey’s Cross-Roads on the morning of the 15th, where the troops still remain.

Fourth Brigade, First Division.

February 5.-The brigade, under command of Bvt. Brigadier General John Ramsey, received orders to march in the afternoon, moving toward Hatcher’s Run. The command formed in line of battle near the Tucker house, connecting with General McAllister’s brigade of the Third Division, Second Army Corps, on the left, and the right resting near as swamp. The brigade remained in this position, and at the same time throwing up earth-works, until the 9th, when it returned to its formed camp. The command was not engaged, yet still held an important part of the line. All this without the loss of an officer or a man.

Since that time no movements have taken place.

[March.]-During the month the command remained undisturbed in camp until the morning of the 25th, when marching orders were received, and the command was held in readiness to move. At 3 p. m. the brigade advanced and moved under cover of a wood one mile in advance of our main line of works. At 5 p. m. the brigade was ordered forward, and formed line of battle with the remainder of the division, connecting with Third Brigade on the right and Second on the left. The fighting was quite spirited, we remaining on the defensive, and was very favorable to our forces. In the night we withdrew to our camp, and resumed the regular of camp duty.

March 29.-The brigade again moved, and, advancing on the Vaughan road a short distance, filed to the right and formed line of battle near were made and the line extended farther to the left until this command extended to the Boydton road.

March 31.-The brigade was ordered farther to the left, and at 1 p. m., the Third Division of the Fifth Corps being driven back, I was ordered to assume the offensive, and became warmly engaged with the enemy and drove them about two miles, but not without severe loss. The night closed the contest, and the command was ordered to fortify the advanced position and be prepared for future operations.

April 1.-Marched from in front of Petersburg to join the forces under General Sheridan.

April 2.-Joined General Sheridan at daylight. Entered the enemy’s works and participated in the action near the South Side Railroad. Captured 2 guns and 1 battle-flag.

April 3, 4, and 5.-Marched to overtake the retreating enemy.,

April 6.-Came in sight of the enemy, but were not actively engaged.

April 7.-Participated in the action near Farmville.

April 8.-Resumed the march.

April 9.-Were present at the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. Rested until the 11th instant, when we marched toward Burkeville, where we arrived May 5.

May 6.-Entered Richmond, and marched from there, via Fredericksburg, to Alexandria.

May 13.-Arrived near Alexandria, Va., and encamped near Fourth-Mile Run, where we still remain.

[June.]-No change of locality of camp during the month.

Second Division.

February 5.-In the morning, in compliance with orders received, the division advanced on the Vaughan road toward Hatcher’s pickets were found strongly posted; they were soon driven in, and, after a short engagement, a new line was established.

February 11.-The division remained in camp inactive until the 25th instant, at which time the enemy made a partially successful assault on our line in front of Petersburg, when, with other portions of the corps, it participated in a successful movement on the enemy’s line near Hatcher’s Run.

March 26.-Having accomplished its object, the command returned to camp at night.

March 29.-Again broke camp, and took an active part during the remainder of the month in the operations against the enemy in the vicinity of Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-In the morning, in conjunction with the army, broke the lines of the enemy, carrying a redoubt and capturing two guns. Rapid pursuit of the enemy was kept up and frequent skirmishing occurred until April 9, when the enemy surrendered near Appomattox Court-House, Va.

April 11.-In the morning the troops moved on the return march.

April 14.-Arrived at Burkeville. Remained in camp at Burkeville, Va., until 30th instant.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

February 4.-In the evening this command received orders to be in readiness to move at 7 a. m. on the morning of the 5th. At the hour designated the command was under arms, and soon after moved with the column on the Vauhan road to Hatcher’s Run.

The command participated in the skirmishes at the run, and also aided in repulsing several charges made by the enemy in front of the Third Division of this corps on the afternoon of the 5th instant.

February 11.-In the morning the command was assigned to its present position on the Vaughan road in reserve camp.

[March.]-This command remained inactive during the month until the enemy assaulted our line in front of Petersburg, when, with other portions of this corps, it participated in an attack on the enemy’s left, near Hatcher’s Run, March 25. Having accomplished the desired object, the command was ordered back to camp the night of the same date.

March 29.-In accordance with orders the command broke camp and took an active part in the operation near Hatcher’s Run during the remainder of the month.

Third Division.

February 5.-Moved to Hatcher’s Run; First and Second Brigades took position on the western side.

February 6.-First and Second Brigades returned to the eastern side of the run and took position near the Tucker house.

February 9.-Troops took position now hold, extending from Battery B to Armstrong’s Mill; headquarters at Claypole house, on Squirrel Level road.

April 1.-Remained in position on Boydton plank road.

April 2.-Occupied the enemy’s line of works, and moved forward within two miles of Petersburg. Took position in line, connecting Sixth and Twenty-fourth Army Corps. Ordered to report to Major-General Wright, commanding Sixth Corps.

April 3.-Petersburg being evacuated, moved down the South Side Railroad, rejoining the Second Corps.

April 4.-Marched seven miles toward Jetersville.

April 5.-Marched the enemy at Amelia Sulphur Springs; made six assaults upon him at different points, driving him from his position each time, capturing guns, colors, wagons, and prisoners.

April 7.-Met the enemy near Farmville, Va.; made no attack.

April, 8 and 9.-Marched to Clover Hill. The Army of Northern Virginia surrendered.

April 11.-Marched to New Store.

April 12.-Marched to Farmville.

April 13.-Marched to Burkeville Junction.

April. 30.-Left camp at Burkeville, Junction.

May 2.-Left camp at Burkeville, Va.; marched to Amelia Court-House.

May 3.-Marched to Haxall’s.

May 4.-Marched to Manchester.

May 6.-Marched through Richmond to Yellow Tavern.

May 7.-Marched across Pamunkey River at Littlepage’s Bridge.

May 8.-Marched to Hawkins’ Creek.

May 9.-Marched to Ta River.

May 10.-Marched through Fredericksburg to Oder’s Store.

May 11.-Marched to Tusculum.

May 12.-Marched to Webster house.

May 13.-Crossed the Occoquan at Wolf Run Shoals and marched to Annandale.

May 15.-Went into camp at Bailey’s Cross-Roads, Va.

[June.]-No change of station during the month.

First Brigade, Third Division.

April 1 and 2.-This brigade participated in the attack on Petersburg (on the left flank), and, with the remainder of the corps, pursued the enemy until the surrender of Lee, capturing many prisoners, material of war, and wagons, especially April 6. After the surrender of Lee, the brigade returned to near Burkeville, where [April 30] it now is.

General Mott (commanding division) having been wounded on the 6th, General de Trobriand assumed command of the division, and Colonel R. B. Shepherd, First Maine Heavy Artillery, assumed command of the brigade. The Fortieth New York Volunteers now garrisons Farmville.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

February 1.-This brigade was encamped a short distance outside of the rear line of works and about 1,500 yards west of the Weldon railroad.

February 5.-Broke camp at 7 a. m. and marched on the Vaughan road to Hatcher’s Run. Participated in the engagement on that day. During the night the enemy fell back.

February 6.-In the morning a new line works, extending form the left of the former line to Hatcher’s Run, was laid out, and the brigade was engaged in constructing this line on the 6th, 7th, and 8th, making abatis and slashing the timber in front of it.

February 9.-The brigade went into camp about 1,500 yards in rear of the line and near the Vaughan road, where it has since remained, doing picket, fatigue, and camp duties.

March 1.-The brigade occupied the same camp as on February 28,. viz, in rear of union line, near Humphreys’ Station.

Remained in camp doing picket, fatigue, and camp duty until the morning of the 29th, when it broke camp and marched on the Vaughan road about one mile beyond Hatcher’s Creek.

March 30.-The brigade marched in line of battle toward the Dabney Mill road. Halted for the night near the mill.

March 31.-Advanced in line of battle until we met the enemy near the battle-ground of October 27, left on brigade resting near the Boydton plank road.

April 1.-Brigade lay in line of battle (in the morning in same position as on March 31) perpendicular to crossing the Boydton road where the fight of October 27 occurred.

April 2.-About 8 a. m., the enemy having been driven from their works in our front, the brigade moved by the flank up the plank road to near Petersburg. Skirmished with the enemy until near dark. Remained for the night in line around the house formerly occupied by General Mahone as headquarters.

April 3.-Marched about fifteen miles in pursuit of the enemy on river road in direction of Lynchburg.

April 4.-Marched about five miles. Brigade employed in corduroying road.

April 5.-Marched about fifteen miles, striking Danville railroad, where we encamped.

April 6.-Marched at 6 a. m. Skirmished with the enemy, capturing wagon train, one piece of artillery, small arms, 7c., at Sailor’s Creek, where we remained for the night.

April 7.-Marched about fifteen miles in direction of Lynchburg.

April 9.-Marched to Clover Hill, where General Lee surrendered to General Grant.

April 10.-Remained in camp.

April 11.-Marched back to New Store.

April 12.-Marched to Farmville.

April 13.-Marched to Burkeville, where we have since remained, doing camp and fatigue duty.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

February 4.-Broke camp near the Halifax road, and joined the division in the expedition to Hatcher’s Run on the 5th.

February 5.-During the engagement with the enemy in the afternoon this brigade took up line of battle on left of Vaughan road and repulsed loss to them.

The new line having been formed, the command remained quiet in camp in rear of the breast-works near the Vaughan road for the rest of the month.

[March.]-Remained in camp near Hatcher’s Run, participating in the affair of March 25 near the Tucker house, where, after a stubborn resistance on the part of the enemy, we succeeded in taking and retaking the enemy’s picket-line in our front.

March 29.-Broke camp, and moved with the rest of the division to the left near the Boydton plank road.

March 31.-Made a gallant charge on the enemy’s works to develop their strength.

April 2.-Attacked and captured the enemy’s picket-line where the Boydton plank road crosses the White Oak road, and afterward occupied his main works and advanced to Petersburg.

April 3 to 5.-Pursued the enemy.

April 6.-Came up with him at Amelia Springs. Skirmished with him all day, and at night succeeded in forcing him to abandon his wagon train.

April 7 and 8.-Continued the pursuit; also on the 9th until 8 a. m., when near Appomattox Court-House the surrender of Lee was announced and the troops ordered to make camp.

April 11.-Were ordered to Burkeville, and arrived there on the 14th. April 13 and 14, acting as rear guard to the Artillery Brigade. Made camp on the 14th, where the command remained during the rest of the month.

May 2.-The brigade started from Burkeville Station with the Second Corps.

May 6.-Passed through Richmond.

May 15.-Arrived near Bailey’s Cross-Roads.

May 23.-Passed in review at Washington.

[June.]-Remained quietly in camp, near Bailey’s Cross-Roads, Va., during the month.

Artillery Brigade.

[February.]-The movement to and engagement at Hatcher’s Run occurred between the 5th and 8th of this month. Only two batteries of this brigade-Tenth Massachusetts and K, Fourth United States-participated.

[March.]-In the engagement on the 25th four batteries of this brigade were engaged: Tenth Massachusetts Battery; K, Fourth U. S. Artillery; M, First New Hampshire Artillery; and B, First New Jersey. Six batteries of this brigade are on detached service, with Artillery Reserve; C and I, Fifth U. S. Artillery; Fifth Pennsylvania Artillery; G, First New York Artillery; Twelfth New York Battery; Third New Jersey Battery; and Sixth Maine Battery.

FIFTH ARMY CORPS.

[January.]-The corps has remained in its camp between the Halifax road and Jerusalem plank road, no movement having taken place during the month.

February 5.-The corps moved from its camp between the Halifax road and the Jerusalem plank road in the morning, i obedience to orders from the major-general commanding Army of Potomac, taking part in the actions of the 5th, 6th, and 7th, as Rowanty Creek and near Hatcher’s Run, it being now [March 6] in camp near the letter place.

[March.]-The corps remained in its camp near Hatcher’s Run up to 6 a. m. on the 25th.

March 25.-At 6 a.m . the Second and Third Divisions were ordered to move to the support of the Ninth Corps, in front of Fort Stedman, to aid in repelling an attack of the enemy upon that portion of our line. About the same time the First, Division was ordered to move to the support of the Second Corps. The attack on Fort Stedman having been repulsed and the enemy driven back by the Ninth Corps, the Second and Third Divisions were not engaged. the Third Brigade of the First Division had a sharp fight with the enemy on the Second Corps front and repulsed his attack. At night the corps returned to its former camp.

March 29.-The corps broke camp at 4 a. m. and marched down the stage road, crossing Rowanty Creek, taking position at the junction of the stage and Quaker roads, from which point it moved up the Quaker road the near the junction of the Boydton plank road. Here, about 4 p. m., the First Division met the enemy, and, after a severe action, drove him into his works.

March 30.-The corps remained in position, and during the day advanced our lines toward the White Oak road and constructed breast-works.

March 31.-The Second and Third Division advanced against the enemy, who met them in superior force, causing our line to fall back. The First Division then advanced and restored the line, taking a number of prisoners and one battle-flag. the enemy did not follow, and by night-fall had completely retired from the position held by him in the morning. During the night the corps was massed near the Boydton plank road to Dinwiddie to the support of Major-General Sheridan.

April 1.-The First and Third Divisions of this corps moved at daylight to support General Sheridan, at Five Forks, on the White Oak road, the Second Division having moved to that point the night previous. the corps engaged the enemy about 3.30 p. m., and after a severe battle, with the assistance of the cavalry, drove him completely from the field, capturing 5 guns, 12 battle flags, and 3,244 prisoners. About 5 p. m. Major-General Warren was relieved from the command of the corps by Major-General Sheridan and Bvt. Major General Charles Griffin assigned to the command. The battle casing about dark, the corps bivouacked on the field. bvt. Brigadier General Fred. Winthrop was killed.

April 2.-Marched at 6 a. m. toward the Claiborne road; returned to the White Oak road; thence down the Ford road across Hatcher’s Run to Cox’s Station, on South Side Railroad; captured 1 engine and 3 cars and tore up the track; continued on march to the junction of the Namozine and River roads. Here General Crawford’s division was moved down the Namozine road toward the river to support General Merritt, and had a slight skirmish with the enemy. Marched twenty miles.

April 3.-Marched down the River road, bridging and crossing Namozine Creek; picked up many straggling rebels, who were concealed in the woods. At 6.30 p. m. received the news of the capture of Petersburg and evacuation of Richmond. Halted near Deep Creek and bivouacked for the night, after a march of twenty-three miles. Picket up and turned over to the ordnance department three brass 12-pounders abandoned by the enemy.

April 4.-Marched at 5 a. m. via Dennisville, arriving at Jetersville, on the Danville railroad, at 5.20 p. m.; went into position and threw up a line of breast-works; distance marched this day twenty-five miles.

April 5.-Remained in position all day.

April 6.-Marched at 6 a. m. toward Amelia Court-House; thence along the Prideville road, via Painville, to vicinity of Ligontwon, marching about thirty-two miles. Picket up to-day 300 prisoners,

and destroyed a number of rebel wagons and caissons.

April 7.-Marched at 5.30 a. m., crossing Bush Creek, to Prince Edward Court-House, a distance of eighteen miles.

April 8.-Marched at 6 a. m.,moving up the Lynchburg railroad via Prospect Station, following the Twenty-fourth Corps; continued on march until 2 a. m., bivouacking within three miles of Appomattox Court-House; marched this day about twenty-nine miles.

April 9.-Marched at 4 a. m., reaching the vicinity of Appomattox Court-House about 7 a. m. Found the cavalry sharply engaged with the enemy, who were driving our skirmishers; went into position at once and advanced against the enemy, who, after a short contest, retreated, and about 9 a. m. it was announced that General Lee had surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia. Orders to cease firing were immediately given, and the troops halted where they were, having reached and taken possession of Appomattox Court-House. About 3 p. m. the troops went into camp.

April 10.-Brevet Major-General Griffin appointed one of the commissioners to arrange the terms of surrender.

April 12.-The rebel army marched out and surrendered its arms, guns, and colors, the First Division, Fifth Corps, receiving them. The captures numbered 157 pieces of artillery, 71 battle-flags, and about 17,000 stand of small-arms. Official report of prisoners surrendered 26,115.*

April 13 and 14.-Removed the captured property to the railroad for transportation to Washington.

April 15.-Left Appomattox Court-House at 2 p. m., following the railroad, halting for the night after a march of thirteen miles.

April 16.-Marched at 6 a. m., via Prospect Station, to Farmville, marching seventeen miles.

April 17.-Marched at 7 a. m., taking the road to Burkeville; thence to Little Sandly Run, where the corps went into camp; distance marched this day twenty-seven miles.

April 18 and 19.-Remained in camp.

April 20.-Marched at 7 a. m. to Nottoway Court-House, relieving the Ninth Corps in guarding the railroad from Burkeville to Petersburg; distance marched, eighteen miles. The corps continued on this duty during the remainder of the month, corps headquarters remaining at Nottoway Court-House. The casualties in the corps from March 29 to April 9, inclusive, number:

May 1.-Left Nottoway Court-House at 9 a. m. and closed the corps on the First Division, which was occupying Wilson’s Station; distance, sixteen miles.

May 2.-Marched at 6 a. m., via Sutherland’s Station, to within five miles of Petersburg, and went into camp, a march of twenty miles.

—————

*Compilation of lists of prisoners parolers foots up 28, 231. See p. 1277.

—————

May 3.-Marched at 6 p. m., passing through Petersburg and up the Petersburg and Richmond pike to Drewry’s Bluff, a distance of eighteen miles.

May 4.-Marched at 6 a. m., arriving at Manchester at 8.30 a.m., and went into camp outside the town;’ marched five miles. Continued our march to Hanover Court-House, encamping at night on the old battlefield; marched twenty-three miles.

May 5.-Remained in camp; corps headquarters at Chesterfield Park.

May 6.-Marched at 9 a. m. in conjunction with the rest of the Army of the Potomac.

May 7.-Marched at 10 a. m. to Concord Church and went into camp; distance, twelve miles.

May 9.-Marched at 5 a.m ., crossing the Massaponax and Rappahannock Rivers, and encamped opposite Frederickburg; distance marched, twenty miles.

May 10.-Marched at 5 a. m., crossing Potomac, Aquia, and Chopawamsic Creeks; distance marched, eighteen miles.

May 11.-Marched at 6 a. m. via Dumfries, crossing the Quantico and Occoquan Rivers, and encamping at Fairfax Station; distance marched, eighteen miles.

May 12.-Marched at 6 a. m., via Fairfax Court-House, to the Columbia pike, and went into camp at Four-Mile Run.

May 23.-Marched into Washington and took part in the grand review of the Army of the Potomac; returned to camp the same day.

[June.]-The corps has remained in camp near Four-Mile Run during the month. Headquarters has remained unchanged.

First Division.

[February.]-The division remained in camp near Jerusalem plank road until the morning of the 5th.

February 5.-A sufficient guard having been left to protect the camps and surrounding property, the division moved out along the Weldon railroad in the direction of Dinwiddie Court-House, marching that day seventeen miles.

February 6.-Returned to Hatcher’s Run before daylight.

February 7.-In the afternoon took part in a very severe engagement with the enemy, during which the division lost very heavily. The division held the line of works along the bank of Hatcher’s Run until February 11.

February 11.-They recrossed the run and took up a position on the rear and flank, where they have been since, performing the usual picket, camp, and fatigue duties.

[March.]-The division performed the usual camp and outpost duties, &c., until March 25, when it marched out, leaving, however, the Second Brigade back to support the Second Corps during the fighting that day. Returned in the evening, and remained until the 29th.

March 29.-A general move was made. Participated in all the engagements from Lewis’ farm up to Boydton plank road, where the division lost very heavily.

[April.]-The division participated in all the engagements from the battle of Five Forks up to the surrender of Lee’s army, losing heavily in killed and wounded.

May 2.-Marched from Wilson’s Station, Va., via Petersburg, to Richmond.

May 6.-Passed through Richmond; marched toward Washington.

May 12.-Arrived at Arlington Heights.

First Brigade, First Division.

February 5.-In accordance with orders, the brigade broke camp at 6.30 a. m., and with the balance of the division moved west to the Weldon railroad; then south and southwest on a road leading to Dinwiddie Court-House, halting at 4 p. m. on the plantation of Oliver Chappell, and remained until 11 p. m.; then retruded by the same road to the Vaughan road; then marched north on the Vaughan road to the south bank of Hatcher’s Run and occupied earth-works covering crossing of the stream.

February 6.-About 3 p. m. the brigade was ordered to the support of General Winthrop’s brigade, then being pressed by an assault of the enemy. Formed a line of battle, facing west, and moved forward. A charge was ordered on the enemy, which was executed in a most gallant style. The enemy broke at the first volley and fled in great confusion. After pursuing for some distance, the brigade was halted, in consequence of being out of ammunition. At 5.30 p. m. rapid firing commenced on the right and to the rear, when the command was changed to face northwest, and remained under arms all night.

February 7.-In the morning the enemy threatened an attack. Sharp firing was kept up between the two lines of skirmishers for three-quarters of an hour, when, a heavy rain and hail storm seeing in, the enemy withdrew to cover of woods. At 11 a. m. the brigade was relieved by General Gregg’s cavalry, and reoccupied the works left the previous day. The casualties were comparatively small. Since the last-mentioned date doing picket and fatigue duty and in erecting quarters.

March 25.-The brigade left camp at Hatcher’s Run, Va., in the morning, and with the balance of the division supported the Second Corps in their attack on the enemy’s lines, returning to camp the same night.

March 29.-Broke camp in the morning; met the enemy on Lewis’ farm, near Gravelly Run, Va., and, after a desperate engagement of nearly two hours, being re-enforced by three regiments from the Third Brigade, drove him from the field. The loss in killed and wounded was severe. Bivouacked on the field of battle.

March 31.-In the morning advanced on the enemy and drove him from his defenses on White Oak road and turned the breast-works; bivouacked for the night; our losses were light.

April 1.-The brigade resumed the march at 6.30 a. m., and with the corps joined General Sheridan’s command at 8.30 of the same morning. Advanced in line of battle against the enemy at 3.30 p. m. and fought the battle of Five Forks, capturing a large number of prisoners. Our loss was small.

April 2.-Crossed the South Side Railroad in pursuit of the retreating enemy, which pursuit was followed up until the surrender of General Lee, April 9, near Appomattox Court-House. Remained at this point until the 15th awaiting the parole of prisoners and gathering in captured arms and ammunition.

April 15.-In the morning took up the line of march for the South Side Railroad, arriving at Wilson’s Station, on that road, the 21st. Here the brigade went into camp, doing duty along the railroad and at residences in the vicinity during the remainder of the month.

May 2.-The brigade passed through Petersburg, and marched toward Richmond.

May 4.-Arrived at Manchester, opposite that city.

May 6.-It passed through Richmond, leading the corps, and arrived in the vicinity of Washington, D. C.

May 30.-The One hundred and eighty-fifth New York Volunteers was mustered out of service, and left for home May 31.

Third Bridade, First Division.

[February.]-The brigade remained in camp near Jerusalem plank road until February 5.

February 5.-Leaving a sufficient guard to protect the camps, the brigade moved out along the line of the Weldon railroad, and proceeded toward Dinwiddie Court-House, marching on that day about seventeen miles.

February 6.-Returned to Hatcher’s Run before daylight, and on the afternoon of same day took part in a severe engagement with the enemy, with considerable loss in killed and wounded. Held line of works along the bank of Hatcher’s Run until February 11.

February 11.-Crossed the run in the morning and took position on rear line, where the brigade has since remained, performing the usual camp and outpost duties with an occasional detail for fatigue.

[March.]-The brigade performed the usual camp and outpost duties, with frequent reviews and several brigade dress parades, until the 25th.

March 25.-The brigade was moved out to support the Second Corps during that day, as the enemy made an attack near Petersburg, and the line on the left was pushed forward. Returned the camp at night and remained until 29th.

March 29.-A general move was made. This brigade was in the engagement at Lewis’ farm on the 29th, and at Boydton road on 30th and 31st, suffering considerably in killed and wounded.

April. 1.-The brigade took part in the engagement at Five Forks, losing a few men killed and wounded, and capturing a very large number of prisoners from the enemy. Followed the retreating rebel army until the 9th instant.

April 9.-The brigade took part in the engagement at Appomattox Court-House, with a loss of one man wounded on the skirmish line.

General Lee surrendered the whole Army of Northern Virginia on that day.

April 12.-The brigade was drawn up in line to receive the captured arms and colors. Remained at Appomattox until the 15th.

April 15.-The brigade took up line of march toward Burkeville, which was passed on the 17th. Remained in that vicinity until the 20th.

April 20th.-Took up line of march along the South Side Railroad.

April 23.-Relieved troops of the Ninth Corps on the railroad near Sutherland’s Station.

The brigade remained until April 30 employed in guarding the railroad, commissary, and quartermaster’s stores, and as safeguards to the citizens residing in that vicinity.

May 2.-Broke camp at Sutherland’s Station, and marched to Manchester, via Petersburg.

May 4.-Arrived at Manchester, and remained there until the 6th.

May 6.-Marched through Richmond, and took up line of marched for Alexandria.

May 12.-Arrived at Arlington Heights, where the brigade went into camp, and has remained up to the 31st instant.

Second Division.

February 5.-The division marched from camp near Gurley house in the morning though the –road; reached Rowanty Creek at noon; found the enemy in some force entrenched upon the farther bank, but a sharp engagement dislodged him and effected a crossing for the cavalry and corps. Continued the march to the Vaughan house, where a strong position was taken up, the First and Second Divisions coming up upon the left and right. At 11 p. m. moved down the Vaughan [road] to breast-works near Hatcher’s Run, arriving at daybreak. In the afternoon engaged the enemy, two brigades supporting the Third Division, near Dabney’s Mill, and one holding the Vaughan road against the enemy attacking in force. At night encamped near Hatcher’s Run; spent several days in work upon new lines.

February 11.-Came back a mile to this camp, where the division still remains.

[March.]-The division lay quietly in camp near Hatcher’s Run until the 25th.

March 25.-The division was suddenly marched to the Gurley house and then to the lines of the Ninth Corps to assist in repelling an attack of the enemy. At night the division returned to its formed position without having been engaged.

March 29.-In the morning the command broke camp at 3 o’clock and marched to Rowanty Creek, which was crossed without opposition. The march was continued to the junction of the Vaughan and Quaker roads, where the division halted for the night with the exception of the First Brigade, which was sent to re-enforce the First Division, engaged with the enemy on the Boyton plank road.

March 30.-Crossed the Boydton plank road, and in the afternoon made a reconnaissance in a northwesterly direction to the neighborhood of the Dabney house, on the White Oak road, and leaving there a strong picket.

March 31.-In the morning re-enforcement the picket-line with he whole division, and soon after received orders to take the White Oak road and intrench upon it, the Third Division being sent as a support. An attack was accordingly made, but not attended with success, as the enemy was present in overwhelming numbers. The command, however, fell back in good order toward its supports, but they suddenly, and apparently without cause, withdrawing, was compelled to continue its retreat to the position occupied the previous night. Later in the day advanced with the rest of the corps to the White Oak road without opposition, the enemy having marched toward Dinwiddie. At 11 p. m. received orders to report immediately to General Sheridan, at Dinwiddie, and midnight and the close of the month found us making a difficult night march down the Boydton plank road.

April 1.-The division joined the cavalry forces under General Sheridan near Dinwiddie Court-House early in the morning, and later in the day took a prominent part in the battle of Five Forks, finding in its front the enemy strongly entrenched, but carrying the works and capturing nine battle-flags and over 1,000 prisoners. Brevet Brigadier-General Winthrop here fell mortally wounded just at the moment that it was evident that the victory was ours. The enemy were pursued some three miles that evening.

April 2.-Crossed Hatcher’s Run and marched down the South Side Railroad toward Petersburg, bivouacking at night near Beverly Ford.

April 3.-It was discovered that the enemy had evacuated Petersburg, and from that time to the 9th the division was in close pursuit, sometimes with the Army of the Potomac and sometimes with the cavalry. Long and tiresome marches were made daily, but the division was not engaged until the morning of the 9th.

April 9.-The rebel Army of Northern Virginia surrendered. At this time the division had the good fortune to be advancing rapidly in line of battle, and the flag of truce preparatory to negotiations came through its skirmish line, which had already driven the enemy more than a mile, its left wing capturing a caisson and putting to flight a battery, while the right had advanced near to the town. After the surrender the division remained at Appomattox Court-House until the 15th.

April 15.-Marched to Burkeville and afternoon encamped along the South Side Railroad, doing picket on that part of the road between Burkeville and Nottoway Court-House, the headquarters being at the latter place.

May 12.-The division reached the banks of the Potomac, having left Nottoway Court-House on May 1.

First Brigade, Second Division.

February 5.-The brigade broke camp near the Gurley house, Va.; marched down the Halifax road to Rowanty Creek, and lay in line of battle until midnight, when it moved back upon the Vaughan road and occupied a line of breast-works to the left of the road about a mile west of the run. About 1 p. m. moved out to the support of Gregg’s cavalry, who were skirmishing heavily with the enemy; relieved the cavalry pickets. The enemy attempted to advance several times, but were repulsed. Being relieved by the First Brigade of the First Division, the brigade was ordered out on picket, where it remained until the afternoon of the 7th. It established camp soon after its being relieved from picket, about two miles to the right of the Vaughan road, where it has since then remained.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

February 5 (Sunday).-This brigade marched from its camp near the Gurley house at 7 a. m. in a westerly direction; crossed Hatcher’s Run about noon of the same day, and proceeding until 4 p. m., took position at the Vaughan house, on the rebel military road. At 11 p.m. marched back to Hatcher’s Run, taking position in breast-works at daylight.

February 6.-At 2 p. m. we followed Crawford’s division, formed in line, and advanced into the woods; encountered the enemy; charged and drove him to Dabney’s Mill; fought him in a brisk action until all the ammunition on the persons of the men was consumed, after which we were relieved by other troops. The engagement lasted two hours and a half, during which time we sustained a loss of 3 officers and 9 men killed, 3 officers and 85 men wounded, and 15 men missing. After several days’ work throwing up entrenchments, the brigade, on the 11th, went into camp near Hatcher’s Run, whored it has remained during the balance of the month.

March 29.-Found the brigade on the march, in the center of the division, and after passing Rowanty Creek, about 9 a. m., it reached the Vaughan road about noon, after a march of eight or ten miles.

March 30.-Crossed Gravelly Run.

March 31.-Had a spirited engagement with the attacking enemy near White Oak road, being first forced to retreat, but afterward regaining the lost ground. the casualties were 8 men killed, 3 officers and 37 men wounded, and 72 men missing; aggregate, 120. Among the wounded was Brevet Brigadier-General Denison, the commander, upon whole retirement the command devolved on Colonel R. N. Bowerman, Fourth Maryland Volunteers.

April 1.-Formed a junction with Sheridan’s cavalry; attacked and carried the enemy’s breast-works near Five Forks. Colonel Bowerman was wounded in the early part of the engagement, leaving the command with Colonel D. L. Stanton, who was succeeded were 8 men killed, 7 officers and 52 men wounded, and 14 men missing; aggregate, 81. Many prisoners were captured and two battle-flags taken by this brigade. After this the brigade assisted in the pursuit of the retreating enemy, acting near to and mostly in conduction with Sheridan’s cavalry. The marching was rapid and sometimes fatiguing, but with the exception of one man wounded ont eh 9th no further casualties occurred until the surrender of Lee with the rebel army under his command, which terminated the campaign and virtually the war.

April 15 to 17.-From Appomattox Court-House, where this took place, the brigade marched back to near Nottoway Court-House, forty-four miles; went into camp and remained quietly until the end of the month.

April 30.-This brigade received marching orders.

May 1.-Left its camp near Nottoway Court-House, marching with the corps by way of Petersburg to the vicinity of Richmond.

May 4.-Arrived in camp near Manchester.

May 6.-Left and marched through Richmond; thence northward by way of Fredericksburg to Arlington Heights, where we went into camp May 13.

May 23.-Took part in the grand review of the army in the city of Washington.

May 31.-Three regiments of the brigade, viz, Fourth, Seventh, and Eighth, and a detachment of the First, mustered out under General Orders, Numbers 94, War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office.

This closes the career of the Maryland Brigade, which was organized by General J. R. Kenly at Harper’s Ferry and Maryland Heights in the winter of 1862 and 1863, and has been an integral part of the Army of the Potomac since July, 1863.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

February 5.-In the morning brigade moved in accordance with circular from headquarters Fifth Corps of the 4th instant, reaching Rowanty Creek about noon, where the enemy was found posted in strong works on the opposite bank. These works were taken by this brigade, capturing twenty-seven prisoners. After a short delay to cover the crossing of the remainder of the division, the brigade again advanced some three or four miles and took up position before dark on the left of Second Brigade. The march was again resumed at 11 o’clock, and continued until reaching the crossing of the Vaughan road at Hatcher’s Run, where the brigade was massed in reserve.

February 6.-During the morning relieved the First Brigade in the works. In the afternoon engaged the enemy at Dabney’s Mill, losing 8 officers and 62 men in killed, wounded, and missing.

March 24 [25].-The command moved from camp near Hatcher’s Run, Va., to a position near the Guarley house, to assist in repelling an attack made on our lines in front of the Ninth Army Corps; were not called into action during the day; returned to our formed position in the evening.

March 28 [29].-Broke camp about 4 a. m. and moved south toward Dinwiddie Court-House. Did not encounter the enemy during the day. Moved next day to Boydton plank road, it having been taken the day before by the Third Division, Fifth Corps.

March 31.-Advanced against the enemy. Succeeded in reaching to a short distance of the White Oak road. Advanced again during the afternoon and occupied the White Oak road, the enemy having marched from our front and attacked General Sheridan’s cavalry near Dinwiddie Court-House. Colonel Sergeant, commanding Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was wounded in the engagement of the 31st.

April 1.-The command moved in the morning to a point near Dinwiddie Court-House, where it halted until about 3 p. m., when an advance was ordered, the Fifth Corps attacking the enemy on the left flank, driving him with great impetuosity. This brigade captured many prisoners, 2 guns, 2 battle-falgs, and several wagons and ambulances. General Winthrop, commanding First Brigade, was killed during one of the charges in the afternoon. Learned the next morning that the works in front of Petersburg and Richmond were captured by the Sixth and Ninth Corps. Started in the afternoon in the direction of in the direction of the Danville road, capturing many guns, wagons, &c., along the route. Reached Danville road after three days’ forced march, occupying Burkeville before the arrival of Lee, thereby heading him off from Danville. Lee started for Lynchburg, but, after four days’ very heavy marching, we succeeded in getting between his army and Lynchburg, forcing him to surrender on the 9th instant. Remained near Appomattox Court-House until his army was all paroled, when were returned to Burkeville, and from there the corps moved the relieve the Ninth Corps along the South Side Railroad, where it still remains.

April 28.-The One hundred and fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers was consolidated with the One hundred and ninety-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, per Special Orders, Numbers 96, paragraph V, dated headquarters Third Brigade, Second Division, Fifth Corps.

May 1.-The command moved from Nottoway Court-House toward Petersburg, following the South Side Railroad.

May 3.-Passed through the city, continuing on toward Richmond.

May 4.-Reached that place, where we rested for one day.

May 6.-Passed through Richmond and continued on toward Washington.

May 12.-Arrived there.

May 23.-The Army of the Potomac was reviewed by the President and General Grant.

May 30.-The Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers was mustered out of of service.

May 31.-They left for their State.

Third Division.

February 5.-Moved at 8 a.m .; crossed Rowanty Creek; from that to Gravelly Run; halted for the night;’ portion of division on picket duty.

February 6.-Moved at 4 a. m.; marched back to Hatcher’s Run. At 2 p. m. division moved upon the enemy, and drove him to his works near Armstrong’s or Dabney’s Mill. The enemy being heavily re-enforced, in turn drove our line back to the run.

February 7.-Line again formed at 10 a. m. and advanced on the enemy, driving them from lines of rifle-pits into their main line of works. Heavy skirmishing continued during the entire day.

February 8.-Division principally on picket.

February 9.-Returned to formed camp for baggage, &c.

February 10.-Marched to and established present camp near Halifax road.

March 29.-Division broke camp at Hatcher’s Run and moved in a southwesterly direction, crossing Rowanty Creek; thence following Quaker road until vicinity of Boydton plank road was reached near Gravelly Run, where enemy was found; formed line of battle on left of First Division; deployed skirmishers, covering front of division. The enemy retreated before our advance.

March 30.-Moved to Boydton plank road, forming line parallel. Same day occupied in throwing up breast-works, behind which the troops lay during remainder of day and night.

March 31.-Line formed at 6.30 a. m. and moved out; followed Boydton plank road two miles, then filed to the right, halted, and massed in woods near an open field. The advance of Second Division checked by superior force of the enemy; fell back to prevent capture of division; line was again formed and further advance of the enemy successfully arrested.

April 1.-Moved from Gravelly Run. Action of Five Forks.

April 2.-Moved to Ford’s Station and down the Namozine road. Engagement with enemy’s rear guard at night.

April 3.-Moved to Jetersville.

April 4.-Moved to Jetersville.

April 6.-Moved through Paineville and to Sailor’s Creek, near High Bridge, over the Appomattox River.

April 7.-Moved across the Appomattox River to Prince Edward Court-House.

April 8.-Moved to Evergreen Station.

April 9.-Moved to Appomattox Court-House. Lee’s surrender.

April 15.-Moved east of Pamplin’s Station.

April 16.-Moved to Farmville.

April 17.-Moved to headwaters of Little Sandy River, near Price’s Station.

April 20.-Moved near Nottoway Court-House.

April 21.-Moved near Blacks and Whites Station, the command guarding the railroad from Nottoway to Wilson’s Station.

May 1.-Moved from Blacks and White Station to Wilson’s Station.

May 2.-Moved to Sutherland’s Station.

May 3.-Marched through Petersburg to eight miles from Manchester.

May 4.-Marched to Manchester.

May 6.-Marched through Richmond to Peake’s Turn-Out.

May 7.-Marched to Concord Church.

May 8.-Crossed the Mattapony and marched to Milford Station.

May 9.-Marched to Fredericksburg, crossing the Rappahannock.

May 10.-Marched to Chopawamsic Creek, near Aquia Creek.

May 11.-Marched to near Fairfax Station.

May 12.-Marched to Ball’s Cross-Roads and encamped.

[June.]-The division has remained in camp during the entire month.

First Provisional Brigade, Third Division.

February 14.-This brigade was organized form the Sixth and Seventh Wisconsin, the other regiments of the First Brigade, Third Division, having been sent north on duty. The regiments were, at the time, in their present location, and picket and fatigue duty and the erection of quarters have occupied the attention of both officers and men since that date.

First Brigade, Third Division.

March 3.-The Ninety-first New York Veteran Volunteers was assigned to this brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 55, headquarters Third Division.

March 15.-The term “provisional” was dropped from the designation of the brigade by Special Orders, Numbers 68, headquarters Third Division.

March 26 [25].-At 7 a. m. the brigade moved to the support of the Ninth Corps, and was halted near Warren’s Station until about 4 p. m., when it moved to support the left of the Sixth Corps. After dark the brigade returned to camp.

March 29.-Early in the morning the brigade broke camp and marched to a point near the Boydton plank road.

March 30.-It moved to the plank road and threw up breast-works.

March 31.-Crossed the plank road, and, after advancing about a mile, was attacked by the enemy, and the line in front of this brigade breaking suddenly, allowing the enemy to advance before the brigade could be deployed, it was forced back across a creek in its rear. The battle-field was reoccupied during the day, and our line considerably advanced beyond it.

April 1.-The brigade took a prominent part in the action which secured the evacuation of Petersburg by breaking the South Side Railroad.

April 2.-Moved to the railroad, and on it toward Petersburg three or four miles; then took the Burkeville road west a distance of about five miles, where there was some skirmishing with the enemy.

April 3.-Moved on toward Burkeville and continued in the pursuit of Lee’s army, being near Appomattox Court-House the 9th, when General Lee surrendered at that place. remained until the 14th, for the terms of capitulation to be carried out. Returned by way of Farmville to Burkeville, encamping a few miles out toward Danville.

April 18 (about).-Were ordered to guard the Petersburg and Lynchburg Railroad.

April 20 and 21.-Marched to our present location.

Second Brigade, Thirds Division.

February 5.-Moved from camp on Jerusalem plank road at 7 a. m., marching south, crossing Rowanty Creek; from that to Gravelly Run far as Vaughan road; halted for the night, a portion of the brigade doing picket duty.

February 6.-Moved at 4 a. m.; marched back to Hatcher’s Run. At 2 p.m . moved upon the enemy, and participated in the battle near Dabney’s Mill.

February 7.-Line again formed at 10 a. m.; portion of brigade deployed as skirmishers and advanced on enemy, driving them from line of rifle-

pits into the main line of works. Heavy skirmishing continued during the entire day. At 5 p. m. advance was ordered, but did not succeed in carrying the works, and returned to line held by skirmishers, stopping during the day. The brigade remained on this line until 1 a. m., when it marched back to Hatcher’s Run.

February 8.-On picket duty during the entire day.

February 9.-Returned to formed camp for baggage, &c.

February 10.-Marched to and established present camp near Halifax road.

March 7.-The Third Division, to which this brigade is attached, was reviewed by General Meade.

March 14.-Corps reviewed by General Meade.

March 16.-Corps reviewed by Secretary of War and Generals Meade and Warren.

March 23.-Brigade marched to temporarily occupy lines of First Division, Second Corps, absent on review.

March 25.-Brigade moved to support of Ninth Corps, whose works the enemy had attacked and partially carried. Attack repelled by Ninth Corps. Division reviewed by President Lincoln.

March 29.-Brigade broke camp near Hatcher’s Run and moved in a southwesterly direction, crossing Rowanty Creek; then following Quaker road until vicinity of Boydton plank road was reached near Gravelly Run, where enemy was found. Brigade here formed line of battle on left of First Division; one regiment of brigade, deployed as skirmishers, covered front of brigade, connecting with skirmishers of First Division on right and Third Brigade on left. the enemy retreated before our advance and brigade bivouacked in an open field near Boydton plank road.

March 30.-brigade moved to Boydton plank road, forming line parallel with same . Day occupied in throwing up breast-works, behind which the troops lay remainder of day and night.

March 31.-Line formed at 6.30 a. m., and moved out from works built on 30th. Followed Boydton road two miles, then filed to right, halted, and massed in woods near an open filed; one regiment placed on picket, connecting with the picket-line of the Second Division on left, right resting on Gravelly Run. The advance of the Second Division, by superior force of enemy, fell back. To prevent capture brigade fell back across Gravelly Run, when line was again formed and further advance of the enemy was successfully arrested. At 3 p. m. moved again to left and front, crossing the run, recovering our wounded lost in the morning. At night brigade threw up breast-works to complete the line between Second Corps, on right, and First Division of the corps, on left, in rear of which works the brigade bivouacked for the night.

Commissioned officers killed and wounded during the month; Lieutenant Colonel H. M. Tremlett, Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers; Captain W. C. Kinsley, Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers (since died); Lieutenant Alpheus Thomas, Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers; Captain A. H. Van Deusen, Ninety-seventh New York Volunteers; all March 31.

April 1.-The morning found the brigade lying in rear of works built on night of 31st, near White Oak road. Line of battle formed in rear of works and marched in retreat to Gravelly Run Church, which place we reached about 3 p. m. Brigade was here formed in two lines, connecting with First Division on right, and on left with First Brigade, Third Division; advance of the entire line ordered at 3 p. mn. The enemy’s skirmishers were driven steadily before our advance.

On reaching White Oak road changed direction to left, moving parallel with the road. We flanked the enemy’s works, driving them from them in confusion. Pursuit was continued until dark, when brigade moved back on White Oak road and bivouacked.

April 2.-Marched to Hatcher’s Run; crossed South Side Railroad; struck the enemy’s retreating column at midnight;distance marched; twenty-five miles.

April 3.-Continued in pursuit of enemy.

April 4.-Halted for night at Jetersville, on Danville railroad; works thrown up by Third Brigade, this division, in anticipation of an attack.

April 5.-Remained in bivouac during entire day.

April 6.-Formed line of battle at daylight and advanced against enemy, who hastily retreated.

April 7.-Continued pursuit of enemy. Halted for night at Prince Edward Court-House.

April 8.-Resumed march at 6 a. m.; halted at 2 a. m. following day; day’s march, thirty-five miles.

April 9.-Made a rapid march of a few miles, and soon came in sight of our lines, engaged with enemy near Appomattox Court-House. The enemy exhibiting a flag of truce, a cessation of hostilities was ordered until 4 p.m ., at which our General Lee formally surrendered his command to General Grant.

April 10 to 14.-Remained in camp near Appomattox Court-House.

April 15.-Corps ordered to Burkeville Junction, which place we reached on the 17th.

April 20.-Corps ordered to relieve Ninth Corps in performance of duty on line of Danville railroad.

April 21.-Headquarters of brigade established near Blacks and Whites Station. Brigade performed patrol duty up to 30th.

May 1.-Broke camp near Blacks and Whites Station; marched to Wilson’s Station.

May 2.-Resumed march at 6 a. m.; halted for night within five miles of Petersburg.

May 3.-Marched through Petersburg.

May 4.-Resumed march at — a. m.; reached Manchester at noon, and went into camp.

May 6.-Passed in review through Richmond.

May 12.-Reached vicinity of Alexandria and went into camp near Ball’s Cross-Roads.

May 23.-Participated in grand review through streets of Washington.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

February 5.-In the morning, with a strength of 59th officers and 1,301 muskets, left camp on Lee’s Mill road and marched fifteen miles,crossing Hatcher’s Run at Armstrong’s Mill.

February 6.-At 3 a. m. recrossed Hatcher’s Run and engaged the enemy near Dabney’s Mill; a severely contested battle-ground, from which we were withdrawn at dusk to the pits on the run, having lost 10 officers and 193 men killed and wounded.

February 7.-Made a demonstration on the enemy, meeting with a small loss.

February 8.-Recrossed Hatcher’s Run, returning to old camp on the 10th.

February 11.-Changed camp to Colonel Wyatt’s plantation, south of Church road, our loft resting on Halifax road.

March 29.-In pursuance of previous orders, broke camp on Halifax road, reaching point near Boydton plank road about 1 p. m., where General Griffin had already engaged the enemy. Went into line on General Ayres’ left. the One hundred and forty-seventh New York Volunteers, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Dailey, and Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers (consolidated), Major Laycock, having entered the line, immediately advanced, engaging enemy’s skirmishers, driving them across the plank road, which road was permanently held at this point by brigade, and further, being first occupation of that road. After several changes of position, division massed for night where plank road was first struck, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Dailey, One hundred and forty-seventh New York, picketing front at the Butler house.

March 30.-Remained without important change in same position, making several lines of works, finally adopting and erecting works on line of plank road, and right connecting with General Griffin, with reserve at Butler’s burnt house.

March 31.-Marched to Dabney’s house, on Gravelly Run and near White Oak road. General Griffin, with reserve at Butler’s burnt house.

March 31.-Marched to Dabney’s house, on Gravelly Run and near White Oak road. General Ayers’ division (one brigade) went into line about three-quarters of a mile from White Oak road. By order from division headquarters reported to General Ayers, and was shown position to be occupied by brigade short distance in rear of Second Division line. While going into position (right by file) preceding line had advanced and engaged the enemy, and before this brigade was or could be properly in position first line was returning, pressed by the enemy. About same time, of four battalions in position, three of the commanders (Lieutenant-Colonel Dailey, One hundred and forty-seventh New York Volunteers and Major Fish, Ninety-fourth New York Volunteers) had been wounded. The enemy had also concentrated a fire on left flank. These causes, with the retiring of Second Division, compelled the falling back of this brigade; after several temporary intermediate formations of line, secured position on ridge occupied by First Division; here bivouacked for night.

April 1.-Marched from point near Boydton plank road, reaching Gravelly Run Church at 3 p.m ., where line was formed. At 3.30 p. m. advanced, crossing White Oak road; continued advance without halting; enemy’s works were soon crossed, and all resistance having ceased, division then returned to Gravelly Run Chruch, on White Oak road, and bivouacked for night.

April 2.-Crossed Hatcher’s Run, following Chruch road to South Side Railroad. Followed railroad to crossing of Cox road, and from that point marched to forks of Namozine and River roads. Again moved along Namozine road, crossing Chandler’s Run, to junction of Church, or Ford, and Namozine road; very late bivouacked for night.

April 3 to 9.-Brigade was not again actively engaged, duties being confined to a series of long and tedious marches over miserable roads, along which was found abundant evidence of rapid and fatiguing retreat of enemy.

April 9.-Reached Appomattox Court-House 8.30 a. m. Further movements were now arrested by reception of flag of truce, which eventuated in the capitulation, some day, of Army of Northern Virginia (rebel), General Lee, to Lieutenant-General Grant.

Artillery Brigade.

[February.]-Three of the batteries accompanied the corps in the late movements to Hatcherse’s Run, and remained in position on the new ground until the 25th.

February 25.-They were relieved and two batteries sent to do the duty. With this exception no new movements has been made by the command, the old camp having been preserved and three batteries kept on the Ninth Corps front in turn, as heretofore.

March 29.-No event of importance transpired previous to this date, when five batteries (B, Fourth United States, D and G, Fifth United States, B, D, and H, First New York) broke camp and accompanied the infantry of the corps. Battery B, Fourth United States, participated in the engagements of the 29th and 30th, on the Quaker and Boydton roads.

March 30 and 31.-Batteries D and G, Fifth United States, were also engaged in the same locality.

March 31.-[Battery] H, First New York, was also engaged near the Boydton plank road, as was also Battery D, First New York Artillery.

May 1.-The five batteries reported present were en route from Nottoway Court-House to Richmond, via Petersburg, Va.

May 4.-Arrived at Richmond.

May 6.-Resumed march to Washington, via Hanover Court-House, Bowling Green, Fredericksburg, and Fairfax Court-House.

May 12.-Arrived at Washington. Since that date the command has been encamped, with main body of the corps, on Columbia turnpike, about three miles from Washington City.

SIXTH ARMY CORPS.

January.-No change of camp during the month.

[February.]-The corps remained in camp until the night of the 5th instant.

February 5.-The Third Division was ordered to move to Hatcher’s Run and report to Major-General Humphreys, commanding Second Corps.

February 6, 7, and 8.-This division [First] participated in the engagements at Dabney’s Mill.

February 9.-Returned to camp.

February 7.-Pursuant to instructions contained in circular afro headquarters Army of the Potomac (same date), a new disposition of the lines was effected, the corps now occupying the front line from Fort Howard, on the right, to Fort Gregg, on the left, inclusive. With these exceptions, no other events worthy of record occurred.

March 1 to 25.-Remained in camp near Petersburg, nothing unusual or worth of record taking place until the morning of the 25th.

March 25.-The enemy made a desperate assault on a portion of the Ninth Corps front, gaining a temporary advantage, at which time the First Division was ordered to the support of that corps, but before it arrived at the point of attack the enemy had been repulsed and the lost ground regained. As soon as its services were no longer needed the division was ordered back. In the afternoon of the same day an attack was made on the entrenched picket-line the enemy, in front of the corps, which was carried and held, some 650 prisoners being captured; not, however, without a desperate fight, in which the corps lost a considerable number of officers and men.

March 27.-Sharp picket-firing. At night the enemy regained one point of the line taken on the 25th. It was not thought advisable, however, to make any strenuous exertions to retake it.

March 28 to 31.-Nothing unusual occurred; troops held in readiness to move at a moment’s notice.

April 1.- During the night the corps was massed near the Jones house, with a view of making an attack on the rebel works at daylight of 2nd.

April 2.-Assaulted the rebel works at daylight. Carried them, cutting the rebel army in two, capturing numerous guns and prisoners; then moved in the direction of Hatcher’ Run, toward the left, carrying the entire line to that point, when, turning toward Petersburg, the lines were before night, moved close up to the rebel works at that place, preparatory to an assail the next morning. Losses in the day’s operations, about 1,100 officers and men.

April 3.- The city having been evacuated during the night, its surrender was received by our forces shortly after daylight of this day, and in a short time the corps was in pursuit of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia, and encamped at night at Mount Pleasant Church, near Sutherland’s Station, about ten miles from Petersburg.

April 4.- Moved at 4 a. m. and encamped about two miles from Winticomack Creek.

April 5.- Moved at 3 a. m. to near Jetersville Station and encamped.

April 6.- Moved at 6 a. m. in line of battle toward Amelia Courth-House; no enemy being found, proceeded, in the direction of Deatonsville, to Sailor’s Creed. Here, the enemy disputing our advance, a severe engagement followed, in which the right wing of the rebel Army of Northern Virginia was annihilated, many prisoners being taken, among whom were Lieutenant-General Ewell and Major-General Custis Lee, C. S. Army. The Second Division was not engaged. Our loses in this battle were about 442 officers and men.

April 7.- Continued the pursuit of the enemy, encamping near Farmville.

April 8.- Marched to New Store and encamped.

April 9.- Moved to Clover Hill, near Appomattox Court-House, where the remnant of the once formidable Army of Northern Virginia was surrendered.

April 10.- Remained at Clower Hill.

April 11.- Moved in the direction of Burkesville, which was reached on the 13th. Remained encamped near Burkesville until 23rd.

April 23.- Moved to Keysville, in the direction of Danville.

April 24.- Marched from Keysville to Clark’s Ferry, Staunto River.

April 25.- Marched from Clark’s Ferry to Halifax Court-House.

April 26.- Marched from Halifax Court-House to Brooklyn.

April 27.- Marched from Brooklyn to Danville, which was surrendered on that day, with numerous arms, projectiles, and machinery for manufacturing arms, locomotives, &c. Distance marched from Burkeville at Danville (100 miles) was accomplished in four days and four hours. Total number of miles marched during the month, over 300.

April 27 to 30.- Remained at Danville.

May 1 to 16.- Remained encamped at Danville, Va. The First Division was stationed along the line of the railroad from Burkeville Junction to Sutherland’s Station, near Petersburg, and the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, of the Second Brigade, Third Division, was placed on the line of the Richmond and Danville Railroad, between Danville and Burkeville Junction, one company at each station.

May 16.- Broke camp and embarked on cars for Manchester.

May 17 to 22.- Troops arrived at Manchester and encamped near the town.

May 24.- Broke camp and took up line of march for Washington, being reviewed, in passing through Richmond, by Major-General Halleck.

May 29.- Reached Fredericksburg, Va.

May 30 and 31.- Continued the march in the direction of Washington.

First Division.

[February.] -Remained in camp until the night of the 15th.

February 5.- Orders were received to move to Hatcher’s Run and report to General Humphreys, commanding Second Corps.

February 6, 7, and 8.- The division participated in the engagements at Dabney’s Mill.

February 8.- Returned to its old camp along the main line, where it has remained up to the present time.

[March.] -Remained in camp near the Petersburg and Weldon Railroad until the morning of the 25th.

March 25.- The division moved to the right to the support of the Ninth Corps, a part of the front of which had been taken by the enemy. When midway between Hancock’s and Meade’s Stations, learned of the recovery of the captured work by our forces, at the same time received orders from the corps commander to remove to the left, deploy and cover the front between Forts Howard and Fisher, and interval of two miles, while the Second Division demonstrated opposite Fort Fisher. At 3 p. m. moved two brigade (the Second Brigade, General J. E. Hamblin, and the Third Brigade, Colonel O. Edwards) to the support of the right of the Second Division. Advanced, capturing the enemy’s skirmish pits, with nearly 300 prisoners. Entrenched a new line beyond the one captured; picketed the same, and returned the command to camp at midnight.

April 1.- Moved the division from camp near the Weldon railroad and massed it outside of Fort Welch, on the left, at midnight on the right of the corps.

April 2.-4.30 a. m., successfully assaulted, in conjunction with the balance of the corps, the enemy’s works, capturing 10 guns, 6 colors, and 1,000 prisoners. Participated with the corps in the other engagements of that day, which caused the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond.

April 3.- Moved west in pursuit of enemy, continuing the march until April 6, when the division, was again successfully engaged at Little Sailor’s Creek with Ewell’s corps, capturing many colors and prisoners, including General Ewell and Caustic Lee.

April 7 to 9. – Moved, via Farmville, Curdville, and New Store, toward Appomattox Court-House. After surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, returned, via Farmville, to Burkeville and encamped.

April 23.- Moved, via Keysville and Halifax Court-House, to Danville, arriving there at 3 p. m. of April 27. During the month marched over 300 miles.

May 1.- Received orders to distribute the division from Danville north to Burkeville on the line of railroad, which were subsequently modified to read from Burkeville to Southerland’s, near Petersburg. This was accomplished by May 17-First Brigade from Southerland’s west to Wilson’s Station, on South Side Railroad; Third Brigade from Wilson’s Station to Nottoway Court-House, same railroad; Second Brigade from Nottoway Court-House to Burkeville, inclusive, same railroad.

May 17.- Commenced the movement of the division via Petersburg to Manchester, which was completed May 20.

May 24.- Marched second in order of the corps in review through Richmond before General Halleck. Commenced the march for Washington, encamping at night near Hanover Court-House.

May 25.- Continued the march toward Washington, via Fredericksburg, arriving at Wolf Run Shoals on the 31st.

June 2.- Arrived at Hall’s Hill, near Ball’s Cross-Roads, and encamped, and remained the balance of the month.

June 30.- By virtue of General Orders, Numbers 35, headquarters Army of the Potomac, June 20, the division was reorganized and embodied in the First Division, Provisional Corps.

First Brigade, First Division.

[February.] – Since last return the brigade has been encamped in the same position near Petersburg, Va.

[March.] – Since last return the brigade remained in camp at Parke’s Station, Va., until the 25th, when it moved down to the right to support the Ninth Corps-then engaged with the enemy. It was not engaged. In the afternoon, moved down again to the left, near Fort Wadsworth, where it remained until midnight, when it moved back to its old camp.

[April.] -Since last return this brigade has been in all of the engagements in which the Sixth Corps has participated.

Third Brigade, First Division.

April 2. – Charged the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg, successfully carrying them, with a loss of 196 killed and wounded.

April 3. – Invested the city, and then with the rest of the division pursued the enemy in the direction of Amelia Court-House.

April 6. – Engaged in the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, routing the enemy at all points, losing 320 killed and wounded.

April 7 to 9. – Pursued the enemy toward Clover Hill, where their surrender of Lee’s army was announced.

April 11. – Marched to Burkeville Station, via Farmville, and encamped until the 23rd.

April 23. – Marched to Danville, Va., passing through Keysville, Halifax Court-House, and Brooklyn, arriving there on the 27th, and remained in camp up to the last of the month.

May 4. – Moved from Danville, Va., to Wilson’s Station, on the South Side Railroad, and went into camp.

May 18. – Marched to Richmond, via Petersburg; thence to Washington, via Hanover Court-House, Chesterfield Station, Fredericksburg, and Fairfax Station, and encamped at Ball’s Cross-Roads.

Second Division.

April 1.-11 p. m. the division left the camps occupied during last winter and massed in front of Fort Welch.

April 2.-4 a. m. charged and broke the enemy’s line and moved to within a mile of Petersburg.

April 3. – Marched fourteen miles and bivouacked on Whipponock Creek.

April 4. – Marched twelve miles across Winticomack Creek.

April 5.- Marched sixteen miles to near Jetersville Station.

April 6.- Marched to Sailor’s Creek.

April 7.- Marched fourteen miles to Farmville.

April 8.- Marched fifteen miles to New Store.

April 9.- Marched ten miles to Clover Hill, near Appomattox Court-House, where Lee’s army surrendered.

April 11.- Moved back to Farmville.

April 12.- Moved to Bush Creek.

April 13.- Moved to Burkenville Junction.]

April 23.- Moved to twenty-two miles to Keysville.

April 24.- Moved to twenty miles to Staunto River.

April 25.- Moved to twenty miles to Laurel Grove.

April 26.- Moved twenty miles to Brooklyn.

April 27.- Moved seventeen miles to Danville, which town was surrendered to the commanding officer Third Brigade, Second Division, Sixth Corps.

May 17.- Commenced embarking for Richmond part of Second Brigade.

May 18.- Part of Second Brigade left.

May 19.- Balance of First and Second Brigades left.

May 20.- Third Brigade and division headquarters embarked.

May 21.- Arrived at Manchester, Va.

May 24.- Passed through Richmond and marched twenty-one miles to Hanover Court-House.

May 25.- Marched fifteen miles to Chesterfield Station.

May 26.- Marched about ten miles.

May 29.- Marched twenty-one miles to Fredericksburg.

May 30.- Marched sixteen miles to Oak Hill.

May 31.- Marched seventeen miles to Wolf Run Shoals.

Third Division.

February 5.- The Second Brigade of this division was moved to that portion of the line formerly held by the First Division, Sixth Corps, which was sent to the left of the army.

February 7.- They were relieved in turn by the same troops, and then marched back to their original position.

February 9.- The Second Brigade was again moved at an early hour (in compliance with previous orders to extend the lines) in rear of the works occupied by the First Division, Second Army Corps, composing that portion of the line between Fort Fisther and Gregg, and which works they now occupy. During the remainder of the month no events of importance transpired.

March. 1 to 24.- Nothing of importance occurred.

March 25. -The division was ordered under arms, and at 1 p. m. offensive operations were undertaken, which resulted in taking the rebel line of works held by their pickets.

March 26, 27, and 28.-Considerable skirmishing ensued.

March 30 and 31.- Received orders to be in readiness to move at a moment’s notice. Major Aaron Spangler, One hundred and tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, wounded March 25, 1865. No other casualties occurred among commissioned officers during the month.

April 1.- The command remained encamped near Patrick’s Station.

April 2.- At 4 a. m. the division, with the corps, assaulted and carried the enemy’s works in its front, capturing six battle-flags and several pieces of artillery, besides many prisoners.

April 3 to 5.- Pursued the enemy in direction of Burkeville Junction.

April 6. – Overtook and engaged a portion of the enemy at Sailor’s Creek, where a severe battler ensued, which resulted in the complete rout of the enemy and capture of General Ewell and his command.

April 7 and 8.- Continued the pursuit in direction of Lynchburg.

April 9.- After marching some twelve miles the command was halted, where it remained until the news was received of Lee’s surrender.

April 11 to 13. – Returned to Burkeville Junction and encamped in that vicinity.

April 23.- With the corps marched in direction of Danville, Va.

April 27.- Arrived at Danville and encamped southwest of the city.

April 28 to 30.- Remained in camp.

May 16.- Under orders the division broke camp near Danville, Va., and embarked on cars for Manchester.

May 17.- Arrived at Manchester and encamped near the town.

May 24.- Broke camp and took up line or march for Washington, being reviewed in passing through Richmond by Major-General Halleck.

May 29.-Reached Fredericksburg, Va.

May 30 and 31.- Continued the march in direction of Washington.

June 1.- Reached Fairfax Court-House.

June 2.- Marched to Bailey’s Cross-Roads and went into camp, remaining there to date [June 30].

First Brigade, Third Division.

[February.]- Nothing of importance to relate during the month. The headquarters and troops occupy the same position as when the last report was forwarded, viz, in front of Petersburg, Va., near Warren’s Station, Weldon railroad.

April 2.- In the morning this brigade was placed in position in three lines of battle, on the extreme left of the Sixth Corps, in front of Fort Welch, and distant from the enemy’s picket-line about 150 yards. At 4,30 a. m. the entire corps charged the enemy’s works and succeed in carrying them. This brigade on entering the works, wheeled to the left and charged down the enemy’s lines toward Hatcher’s Run, driving and capturing all before it. We captured 14 cannon, caissons, &c., and about 1,100 prisoners. We succeeded in reaching the South Side Railroad and held our position. This movement compelled the evacuation of Petersburg, and during the night the last of the army had left. The enemy were rapidly and closely pursued, and were met again near Destonsville, at Sailor’s Creek. This brigade was again engaged, and, after a severe fight, succeeded in capturing nearly the entire force. The next morning [April 7] continued the pursuit and followed the enemy closely to near Clover Hill, where, on the afternoon of April 9, General Lee surrendered the entire Army of Northern Virginia.

April 11.- In the morning we commenced retracing our steps for Burkeville. Junction, which place we reached on the afternoon of the 13th. Here we went into camp and remained until the 23rd.

April 23.- We marched for Danville.

April 27.- This place [Danville] we reached about midday, when we went into camp, and where we are at the present time. [April 30].

Second Brigade, Third Division.

February 1 to 4.- Troops of this command were encamped near Warren’s Station, Va.

February 5.- The First Division, Sixth Army Corps, being absent on a reconnaissance, this brigade was directed to occupy the works formerly held by First Division, extending from Battery 24 to Fort Wadsworth, which was done.

February 7.- The First Division having returned from the reconnaissance, this brigade resumed its original position near Fort Keene.

February 9.- In obedience to orders received, the troops of this brigade broke camp and marched about one mile and a half to the left, and took position in the line of works previously occupied by First Division, Second Army Corps.

February 10 to 28.- No events of importance transpired worthy narration.

March 1 to 25.- The brigade remained encamped near Patrick’s Station.

March 25.- Early in the morning the enemy attacked the right of the line of works held by the Army of the Potomac and gained a temporary advantage. This command was immediately ordered under arms and preparations were made for offensive movements. At 1 p. m. the One hundred and tenth and One hundred and twenty-second Ohio Volunteers were detached from the brigade and ordered to charge the enemy’s picket-line, which they did in gallant style; but the nature of the ground being unfavorable for the maneuvering of troops, and the enemy being i considerable force, out troops were compelled to fall back. At 4 p. m. the brigade advanced, under a heavy fire of artillery and musketry, and succeeded in carrying the line of works held by the enemy’s picket-line. Skirmishing was kept up until night.

March 26.- Slight skirmishing.

March 27.- Heavy skirmishing.

March 28 to 30.- Picket-firing kept up almost constantly.

March 31.- Received orders to be in readiness to move, which were afterward countermanded.

April 2.- This brigade took and active part in breaking the lines of the enemy in front of Petersburg.

April 3 to 5.-The enemy having retreated toward Lynchburg, this command, in conjunction with the rest of the army, participated in the pursuit of the rebels.

April 6.- This brigade was actively engaged with the enemy near Sailor’s Creek about 4 p. m., resulting in the complete rout of the enemy.

April 9.- The news of Lee’s surrender was received with much rejoicing by the troops of this command.

April 11 to 13.- Marched from the scene of Lee’s surrender to Burkeville, where the troops encamped.

April 23.- Broke camp and took up the line of march with the division and corps in the direction of Danville.

April 27.- After nearly five days of hard marching, this command arrived at Danville, Va., and encamped near the city.

Artillery Brigade.

April 2.- Engagement in front of Petersburg.

April 3 to 6.- Pursued the enemy by the river route.

April 6.- Action at Sailor’s Creek.

April 7 to 9.- Marched in pursuit of the enemy till near Clover Hill, Va., where Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia.

April 11 to 13.- Returned to Burkeville Junction, via Farmville, where we encamped until morning of 23rd.

April 23.- Marched in direction of Danville.

April 27.- Arrived at Danville, Va.

NINTH ARMY CORPS.

[January.]- The troops occupy same position as at date of last return, and no movement has taken place during the month.

[February.]- There has been no movement of the corps during the month except the Third Division.

February 5.- Third Division moved to the left near Hatche’s Run, where it remained under the orders of Major-General Humphreys until the evening of the 10th.

February 10.- It was relieved and returned to its former camp.

March 1 to 25.-Nothing unusual occurred along the line of the corps.

March 25.-In the morning the enemy made a desperate assault on Fort Stedman, in front of the lines of the First Division, and succeeded, after determined resistance on the part of the garrison, in gaining temporary possession of it. The lines were firmly held on either side of the fort until the Third Division, Brevet Major-General Hartranft commanding, came up, when a charge was made by his division and a portion of the First Division, which soon resulted in the recapture of the fort and the capture of a large number of prisoners, besides inflicting upon the enemy a severe loss in killed and wounded while being driven back to his works. Our loss was comparatively small.

Everything remained as usual during the remainder of the month, with the exception of more continued artillery firing.

April 1.- Corps occupied the trenches before Petersburg, Va.

April 2.- Engaged in the general assault upon the enemy, principally upon the works in front of Fort Sedwick.

April 3.- Marched through Petersburg in pursuit of Lee’s retreating army, excepting First Division, which was left to guard the South Side Railroad from Petersburg to Black and Whites Station, extending to the latter place.

April 15.- The Second Brigade, Second Division, moved as far as Burkesville, and the First Brigade to Farmville. The Third Division remained at Nottoway Court-House, which place it reached on the 8th.

April 20.- Corps ordered to Washington, D. C., and started at once for City Point for embarkation.

April 24.- The First Division arrived at Alexandria, Va.

April 25.- The Third Division arrived.

April 26.- The Second Division arrived. The First Division moved through Washington and encamped near Tennallytown, D. C.

First Division.

March 1.- This command occupied the trenches on the right of the Army of the Potomac-its right on the Appomattox River, its left extending nearly to Fort Rice, on the left of Baxter road. It garrisoned on its front eight inclosed works, batteries, and the curtains between. There was also a picket on the Appomattox, extending down the river three miles. There was no movement or change of troops on this front, or anything beyond the usual routine of garrison duty and the fire of artillery and musketry, from which some casualties resulted, until the morning of the 25th.

March 25.- At 4.15 a. m. the enemy assaulted our center in front of Fort Stedman, which they carried, after a stubborn resistance on the part of the garrison. The division temporarily lost possession of one inclosed work and a battery, but holding the rest of its lines steadily, at first were entirely occupied in repealing the repeated attacks of the enemy on other points, and finally, assuming the offensive, with the help of the Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, pressed the enemy and recaptured the works they had lost at 8.30 a. m. without loss of a gun or color. Our capture amounted to 1,005 officers and men prisoners, and 7 stand of colors; our losses, 648 officers and men. The lines were instantly re-established, the Third Division (General Hartranft) occupying Fort Stedman.

March 26.- One half of Hartranft’s troops relieved.

March 27.- The Eighteenth New Hampshire Volunteers assigned and were put on the line, relieving the rest of Hartranft’s command.a

March 29.- Enemy opened with their artillery and musketry with the utmost rapidity at 10.15 p. m. Firing was kept up until 1.15 [a. m.] March 30. Two attempts were made on the part of the enemy to form for a charge, but their line was broken up by our artillery and musketry. Some temporalty movements of the troops of this division occurred during this disturbance, to meet threatened points.

March 31.- Preparations carried out ot assault the enemy’s works in the morning, if opportunity offered.

April 1.- Division in the trenches before Petersburg, extending from the Appomattox to Norfolk railroad (two miles), and picketing the river; under marching orders. During the night demonstrations made upon enemy’s lines.

April 2.- General assault on enemy’s works in front of Petersburg; First Brigade massed in front of Fort Sedwick, reporting to General Hartranft; Second and Third Brigades, with Fifty-first Pennsylvania, of First Brigade, making demonstrations at 4 a. m. along the whole division line; fitting throughout the day.

April 3.- Division enters Petersburg; city authorities surrender to Colonel Ely, commanding Second Brigade, and his flags are first of all the army raised in the city.

April 5.- Division marches to Sutherland’s Station, on South Side Railroad, guarding railroad to Cox road.

April 6.- Division extended to Wilson’s Station.

April 13.- Moved to Wellville.

April 15.- Moved to Blacks and Whites began throwing up works at Ford’s Wilsons, and Blacks and Whites Stations.

April 20.- Marched for City Point to embark for Washington.

April 22, 23, and 24.- Disembarked at Alexandria; encamped at Fowle’s farm.

April 26.- Marched through Washington and encamped near Tennallytown, D. C.

[May.] – Division encamped near Tennallytown, D. C. Detached regiments on guard duty in Washington, D. C.

First Brigade, First Division.

[January.] – The regiments of this brigade have not changed their positions in the trenches in front of Petersburg, Va. The troops have been engaged in picket and trench guard duty, repairing picket-line and covered ways.

[March.]-The regiments have not changed their position in the trenches in front of Petersburg.

March 25.- In the morning the enemy attacked that portion of the line occupied by the Third Brigade. As soon as the nature of the move was ascertained two regiments of this brigade (Thirty-seventh Wisconsin and One hundred and ninth New York Volunteers), lying in reserve in rear of Fort Morton, were ordered to take up their line in the right of this brigade, in order to repulse the enemy should they turn the flank of the Third Brigade, but were finally driven back and the line reoccupied.

The troops have been engaged in picket and trench guard duty, repairing picket-line and covered way.

April 1.- In the night a demonstration, was made on the rebel lines, in front of the position occupied by this brigade, in front of Petersburg, Va. The rebels were found in force, and no determined attack was made.

April 2.- Before daybreak the whole brigade, with the exception of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, which was ordered to hold the line occupied by the brigade, made an assault on the work of the enemy to the right of Fort Sedwick. Their line was carried with great gallantry, five pieces of artillery were captured, also the entire garrison of Fort Mahone-some 400 officers and enlisted men. The lines were held during the day and night.

April 3.- At an early hour in the morning the brigade entered Petersburg, the city being evacuated by the enemy during the night. The loss from the brigade was 25 killed, 150 wounded, and 7 missing.

April 5.- Took up line of march along the South Side Railroad, marching to within two miles of Blacks and Whites Station, arriving there on the 9th instant, where the brigade remained engaged in guarding railroad, doing camp and guard duty, and throwing up inclosed works at the station.

April 20.- In the morning the brigade took up its line of march to City Point, arriving at that place on the morning of the 22nd; embarked immediately on transport for Washington.

April 24.- In the morning arrived at Alexandria, Va. The brigade went into camp about three miles from the city.

April 26.- In the morning the brigade took up the line of march for Washington, arriving at 4 p. m., and encamping at Tennallytown, about four miles from the city, where the troops still [April 30] remain.

Second Brigade, First Division.

[March.]- The command has remained in camp at its old position, in front of Petersburg, Va., near the Appomattox.

March 25.- The line of the Third Brigade of this division was carried by the enemy, and the works known as Battery Numbers 10 and Fort Stedman captured. They also assaulted Battery Numbers 9 (garrisoned by troops of this brigade), but were severely repulsed after a brisk battle of about three hours. The enemy withdrew in haste to his own line of works, having been severely punished for his temerity. In the engagement the brigade captured 16 rebel commissioned officers and 316 men, rank and file. The action commenced at about 4 a. m.

March 29.- Late at night there was brisk artillery and musketry firing on the line, which continued tail nearly morning of the 30th. There was do advance made by either party, however, and the only result was a few casualties.

April.- The brigade was actively engage in the battles resulting in the capture of Richmond and Petersburg, Va.

April 3.- The brigade was the firs to occupy Petersburg in the morning. The flag of the First Michigan Sharpshooters was unfurled on the court-house dome at 4.28 a. m., and was the first Federal flag hoisted in the city.

April 5.- The command left Petersburg, and until April 20 were occupied in picketing the South Side Railroad, guarding private property, &c., with headquarters established seventeen miles from Petersburg, on the aforesaid railroad.

April 20.- Were ordered to proceed via City Point and transport to Washington, D. c.

April 23.- Arrived at latter place.

Second Division.

[March.]- No change has taken place in the position of this division since last report.

April 1 and 2.- Engaged with the enemy before Petersburg.

April.- Followed the enemy’s retreat through Petersburg along the line of South Side Railroad.

April 8.- Reached Burkeville Junction. The First Brigade was advanced to Farmville, remaining at that point until all U. S. forces had been withdrawn across the Appomattox to the vicinity of Burkeville.

April 21.- Commenced move to Washington, via City Point.

April 26.- Reached and encamped near Alexandria, Va., where the division is now stationed.

[May.]- No change has taken place in the position of this division since last monthly return.

First Brigade, Second Division.

[January.]- Engaged in siege operations before Petersburg, Va.

April 2.- Engaged with the enemy, and with the Second Brigade of this division, assaulted and carried Fort Mahone, before Petersburg, Va.

April 3.- Passed through Petersburg, Va., and encamped ten miles from this place; proceeded as guards for wagon trains and prisoners of war.

April 10.- Arrived in Farmville, Va., at which place the brigade did guard and provost duty.

April 20.- Left this place en route for Alexandria, Va.

April 24.- Arrived at City Point, Va.; embarked on the eve of April 26.

April 28.- Arrived at Alexandria, Va., and went into camp about one mile from town, near Fort Lyon.

Third Division.

February 1 to 5.- Remained in camp as reserves to the First and Second Divisions, Ninth Army Corps, from Appomattox to Fort Howard.

February 5.- The division was moved to the left to the vicinity of Hatcher’s Run, where it remained under the orders of Major-General Humphreys, commanding Second Army Corps, until the evening of the 10th.

February 10.-It was relieved and returned to camp, where it still remains.

During the month large fatigue details have been kept at work repairing the works and defenses on rear line, and much attention has been given to the drill and discipline of the command.

[March.]-During the month this division remained in its old position in support of the line held by the troops of the First and Second Divisions of the Ninth Army Corps.

March 14 to 20.- The whole command was engaged in constructing a new rear line of works, cutting and putting up abatis, &c., from Fort Prescott to Fort Bross. Large fatigue details were also kept at work during the month repairing the inclosed works on the rear line of defense.

March 25.- Every regiment in this division took part in the successful repulse of the enemy at Fort Stedman and Batteries 11 and 12. The loss in the command in killed and wounded was 259.

April 1.- At night this division was under arms preparing for the grand attack, which was made before daylight on the morning of the 2nd on Fort Mahone, one of the strongest works of the defenses of Petersburg.

April 3.- The division marched thought the city of Petersburg and encamped about five miles from the town.

April 4 to 8.- The pursuit of Lee was prosecuted, and this division performed rear-guard duty, marching toward Burkeville by the South Side Railroad.

April 8.- Encamped at Nottoway Court-House, and remained until the 20th.

April 20.- We were ordered to City Point. We marched in the morning and encamped at Wellville.

April 21.- At night headquarters were established at Five Forks.

April 22.- Arrived at Petersburg.

April 23.- Reached City Point and immediately embarked in transports for Alexandria.

April 25.- Arrived there and encamped about two miles from the city.

May 1.- In camp near Alexandria, Va., and remained during the month.

May 30 and 31.- The two hundredth, Two hundred and fifth, Two hundred and seventh, Two hundred and eight, Two hundred and ninth, and Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers were mustered out of service under the provisions of Special Orders, Numbers 22, headquarters District of Alexandria and Ninth Army Corps, based on War Department telegrams of May 17 and 18, 1865.

First Brigade, Third Division.

March 1 to 25.- Remained in camp as reserves to the First and Second Divisions, Ninth Army Corps, from the Appomattox to Fort Howard. During this time large fatigue details have been kept at work repairing Fort Bross and the defenses on the rear line.

March 25.- At 4.30 a. m. the enemy advanced and captured Fort Stedman and the adjacent batteries. The brigade was marched forward to support the First Division, Ninth Army Corps. The movements of the Two hundredth and Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers were personally directed by General Hartranft. These

regiments were stationed on the right of the line, in front of the camp of the Two hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers. The Two hundredth and eight Pennsylvania Volunteers went into position hear Fort Haskell. The regiments charged on Fort Stedman and the batteries (now in possession of the enemy), in connection with the Second Brigade, assisting to recapture Fort Stedman and batteries, with a loss of 2 officers and 16 men killed, 14 officers and 190 men wounded. The brigade returned to camp, where it still remains.

[April.]- Detailed reports of the part taken by this brigade in the capture of pars of the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg on April 1 and 2, with lists of casualties, have already been forwarded.

April 3.- Before daylight the brigade passed over the fortifications in columns of regiments and entered the city. On the same day, after returning to camp, the troops up the line of march along the Burkeville road and acted as a guard for the South Side Railroad and wagon trains, making short marches and placing pickets successively on the different parts of the roads as the column advanced.

April 9.- Reached Nottoway Court-House, where we remained until the 20th.

April 20.- Orders were received for the Ninth Army Corps to go to City Point.

April 24 and 25.- The brigade embarked on transports for Washington, but was landed at Alexandria, Va., and has remained near the city last named until the present time.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

February 5.- The brigade moved to the left of the line for the purpose of aiding in the endeavor to extend the line. Reached its destination at 10 p. m. of the 5th, and at once threw up a strong breast-work in its front.

February 6, 7, 8, and 9.- The troops of the brigade were engaged in felling timber, constructing corduroy roads, bridges, &c.

February 10.- Returned to camp during the night. Since that time no movement of any importance has occurred.

[March.]- Nothing worthy of mention occurred until the 14th.

March 14.- The brigade was ordered to throw up a rear line of works, extending from Fort Prescott to a point about one mile in rear of the for; this occupied three days.

March 25.- The brigade was engaged in the battle at Fort Stedman and in a charge on that work, which was occupied by the enemy; retook it, capturing about 850 prisoners, 3 battle -flags, and between 200 and 300 stand of small-arms. The entire loss in the brigade was 2 enlisted men killed, 2 commissioned officers, and 34 enlisted men wounded.

April 2.- In the morning the brigade charged the enemy’s works in front of Fort Stedman; captured them and held them until the morning of the 3rd.

April 3.- The enemy having retreated, the brigade went into Petersburg. Making short marches each day, the brigade reached Burkeville Station about the 16th. After doing all kinds of duty there for six days it was ordered to Nottoway Court-House, and from there to City Point. From the latter place the brigade came by water to Alexandria Va., present camp, arriving here about the 26th.

CAVALRY CORPS.

Second Division.

January 1.- Thirteenth Ohio Cavalry assigned to Third Brigade. Nothing unusual occurred during the month. Drill daily, and scouting parties sent out every day. The command pickets from Jerusalem plank road to James River on left and rear of the army.

February 1, 2, 3, and 4.- Quiet.

February 5.- The division moved out at 3 a. m. to Dinwiddie Court-House without finding the enemy in any considerable force.

February 6. – Formed junction with infantry on right at Gravelly Run. Engaged the enemy and drove them across the run and held the position.

February 7.- Engaged in skirmishing all day successfully.

February 8.- Returned to camp. Received Order Numbers 57, War Department, accepting resignation of Brevet Major-General Gregg.

February 9.- General Gregg relieved of command.

February 10.-General Gregg left the command, and Bvt. Brigadier General J. I. Gregg assumed command.

February 11 to 20.-Quiet.

February 21.-Division received orders to move out at 3 p. m.; 6 p. m., reported at headquarters Army of the Potomac; 8 p. m., returned to camp.

February 22.-Quiet.

February 23.- Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry reeved from duty with this division, per Special Orders, Numbers 51, Army of the Potomac.

February 24.-Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry transferred from Third to Second Brigade of this division. Brigadier-General Davies returned from leave and assume command of division.

February 25 to 28.-Quiet, nothing worthy of note occurring.

March 1.- Division encamped near Petersburg, Brigadier General H. E. Davies commanding; Colonel H. H. Janeway commanding First Brigade, Bvt. Brigadier General J. I. Gregg commanding Second Brigade, and Bvt.

Brigadier General C. H. Smith commanding Third Brigade.

March 2 to 26.- Quiet, nothing unusual occurring.

March 27.- General Crook assumed command of the division; assigned by Special Orders Numbers 78, March 27, headquarters Army of the Potomac.

March 28.-Quiet.

March 29.-At 6 a. m. the division moved out with First and Third Divisions, under Major-General Sheridan, to Dinwiddie Couth-House.

March 30.-In camp at Dinwiddie Court-House.

March 31.-The division moved out at an early hour and engaged the enemy, driving him back. The engagement continued until about 6 p. m., when we fell back to the Court-House, having been without ammunition for some time.

First Brigade, Second Division.

[January.]-During the month the brigade has been in camp at Westbrook’s house, Va., one mile west of McCann’s Station, on the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad, and engaged in picket and scouting duty.

[March.]-Nothing of interest occurred worthy of notice during the month, the brigade being engaged in its usual picket and scouting duty

until the 29th a. m., when the brigade Broke camp, taking up its line of march, in the center of the division, en route for Dinwiddie Court-House, Va., via Reams’ Station, Weldon railroad, arriving at that point early in the p. m., encamping for the night near this point.

March 30.- P. m. moved to the left, encamping in a field near Chamberlain’s Creek, standing ready for action, though not called on.

March 31.-P. m. were heavily engaged with the enemy near Chamberlain’s Creek, and after a severally contested struggle the command was compelled to fall back to the grounds near the point occupied on the night of the 29th, where the command was reformed and encamped near this point oft the night.

[April.]-The brigade has been in active duty all the month, and took an active part in the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond, Va., and the surrender of General Robert E. Lee to General U. S. Grant.

April 5.-The brigade a reconnaissance in the enemy’s rear,

striking their wagon train near Paineville Cross-Roads, capturing 320 white prisoners, 310 colored teamsters, 11 battle-flags, 5 pieces of artillery and teams, and 1 caisson, 310 mules; also burning over 200 headquarters ammunition and ambulance wagons and caissons.

April 6.-In the engagement of that day the command captured 750 prisoners of war, 2 battle-flags, and 2 guns.

Was present with the corps in the march to South Boston, Va., and return to Presburg, Va.

Second PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

January 1.- One battalion, which was on picket on Quaker road, returned to camp.

January 2, 3, 4,and 5.-In camp. Forage scarce.

January 6.-One battalion of regiment went on scout on Quaker and Norfolk roads; returned in evening of same day.

January 7, 8, and 9.-In camp.

January 10.-Went on picket on Quarker road.

January 11 and 12.-On picket.

January 13.-Returned from picket.

January 14.-In camp. Forage still scarce.

January 15.-Inspected by Brevet Brigadier-General Gregg, at 11.30 a. m.

January 16.-Detachment of two officers and seventy-six men went on picket.

January 17 and 18.-Remainder of regiment in camp. Camp guard doubled, with a view to prevent stealing and other depredations.

January 19.-Detachment of two officers and seventy-six men returned from picket.

January 20, 21, and 22.-In camp, engaged in building troughs for horses.

January 23 and 24.-Engaged in fencing camp.

January 25.-One commissioned officer and six enlisted men went went on on recruiting service.

January 26 and 27.-In camp.

January 28.-Regiment went on picket, with exception of one company and pioneers.

January 29 and 30.-On picket.

January 31.-Return to camp. Receive a larger supply of forage.

February 1 and 2.-Regiment in camp.

February 3.-A detail of two commissioned [officers] and sixty-seven men went on picket; remainder of regiment in camp, preparing for inspection.

February 4.-Regiment inspected by brigade commander, 1.30 p. m., mounted; regiment received orders to be in readiness to march.

February 5.-Regiment marched at 1.30 a. m.; dismounted men remaining in camp. Moved toward left, passing by Reams’ Station at day-break. Encountered the enemy at 10 a. m. at Rowanty Creek. Charged them mounted, and, in company with Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, drove them from their works. Lost in the skirmish as follows: 1 killed, 2 wounded, 1 missing. Regiment was out beyond Dinwiddie Court-House.

February 6.-Regiment detailed a guard for wagon train.

February 7 and 8.-Still at the front.

February 9.-Regiment returned to camp.

February 10 to 15.-In camp.

February 16, 17, and 18.-Regiment on picket.

February 19.-Returned to camp.

February 20.-Inspected by Captain Heslop, acting brigade inspector.

February 21.-In camp.

February 22.-Started from camp late in the evening; supposed to be going on raid. Returned to await further orders.

February 23, 24, and 25.-Regiment in camp. Received forty recruits from depot.

February 26.-Received ninety recruits from depot.

February 27.-Went on picket.

FOURTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

January.-During the month the regiment was on picket twice, and during the month did nothing but picket duty.

February 5, 6, and 7.-Regiment took part in the engagement at Hatcher’s Run. Loss, 1 officer [and] 28 men killed, wounded, and missing.

March.-During the month the regiment was on picket twice and made two scouts.

March 29.-Broke camp on Jerusalem plank road.

March 31.-Participated in the engagement at Dinwiddie Court-House.

[April.] Engaged in battles of Paine’s Cross-Roads, Amelia Springs, Sailor’s Creek, Farmville, and Appomattox Courth-House.

EIGHT PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

January 1 to 6.-In camp.

January 7.-Went on picket on Lee’s Mill road.

January 8 and 9.- On picket.

January 10.-Relieved from picket. Commenced changing camp ot a better locality.

January 10 to 21.-Preparing new camp for the reception of the regiment.

January 22.-Regiment inspected by brigade inspector and Major Starr, acting assistant inspector-general, Army of the Potomac.

January 25.-On commissioned officer and six enlisted men left for Harrisburg on recruiting service. Regiment went on picket.

January 26 and 27.-On picket.

January 28.-Relieved, and returned to camp.

January 27 to 29.-In camp.

January 29.-Brigade reviewed by Brevet Brigadier-General Gregg, commanding.

January 30 and 31.-In camp.

February 4.-Command received orders to move at 3. a. m.

February 5.-Regiment moved from camp, taking the plank road to Gary’s Church; thence, via Wood’s Shops, to Reams’ Station. Crossed Rowanty Creek. The regiment then took the advance and charged into Dinwiddie Court-House, capturing 9 wagons and 50 team mules with 10 prisoners. Moved back to Rowanty Creek and camped.

February 6.-At 1 a. m. regiment moved out to the advance, marching on the old stage road to the Quaker road; thence back toward Hatcher’s Run. The regiment was engaged dismounted, and in to the left, charching the enemy, driving him toward Gravelly Run.

February 7.-Command remained standing to horse all day.

February 8.-Moved to Yellow House, then went on picket; was relieved 9 p. m.

February 9.-Command moved back to camp.

Remainder of month the regiment has been in camp performing picket duty, &c.

March 1 to 5.-In camp.

March 6.-Went on picket.

March 9.-Relieved from picket and returned to camp.

March 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14.-In camp. Drill morning and evening.

March 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20.-In camp.

March 21.-Went on picket.

March 23.-Relieved and returned to camp.

March 24 [25].-Enemy made heavy attack in front of Petersburg; were repulsed.

March 25, 26, 27, and 28.-In camp, preparing to move under marching orders.

March 29.-Left camp 5 a. m. and marched to Rowanty Creek. Built bridge and crossed over. Advanced to Dinwiddie Couth-House and camped.

March 30.-Remainder in camp.

March 31.-Left camp and advanced to support of Third and First Brigades. hard fighting all day. Retired at night to Dinwiddie Cout-House and camped for night. Loss heavy.

April 1.-Command moved from Dinwiddie Court-House; attacked and drove the enemy.

April 2.-Command moved at 1 a. m. to South Side Railroad and went into camp.

April 3.-Marched to McKenzie’s Creek and bivouacked.

April 4.-On to the Danville railroad and bivouacked near Jetersville.

April 5.-Attacked the enemy, but was repulsed.

April 6.-Moved to Sailor’s Creek; attached and drove the enemy.

April 7.-Moved to Farmville; crossed Appomattox River; attacked the enemy. Recrossed and moved to Prospect Station and bivouacked.

April 8.-Moved toward Lynchburg. Regiment on picket; bivouacked near Appomattox Station.

April 9.-Moved toward Lynchburg and attacked the enemy. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia. Command bivouacked near Appomattox Court-House.

April 10.-Command moved toward Burkeville and bivouacked.

April 11.-Command moved to Burkeville; camped.

April 12.-In camp.

April 13.-Moved to Nottoway Court-House; camped.

April 17.-Moved toward Petersburg; camped near Wilson’s Station.

April 18.-Moved to Petersburg and camped.

April 19 to 24.-In camp.

April 24.-Moved to Nottoway River and bivouacked.

April 25.-Moved to Rohoick Creek.

April 26.-Moved to near Boydton and camped.

April 27.-Moved through Boydton; crossed Staunton River and bivouacked.

April 28.-Moved to South Boston; crossed Dan River and bivouacked.

April 19.-Moved back to Staunton River; crossed at Moseley’s Ferry and bivouacked.

April 30.-Moved at 12 m.; crossed branch of Meherrin River and bivouacked.

THIRTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

January 1.-Went on picket east of Norfolk railroad.

January 4.-Relieved and return d to camp.

January 19.-Went on picket east of Norfolk railroad.

January 22.-Relieved and returned to camp.

January 31.-In camp.

SIXTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

January 1 to 8.-In camp, performing various camp duties. Regular Sunday inspection of 1st and 8th.

January 9.-Regiment went, foraging about half a mile south of Disputant Station. Va., in compliance with circular order from headquarters Second Cavalry Division, dated January 7, 1865. The rear guard was fired into by guerrillas, killing 2 men and wounding 3. Returned same p. m.

January 10, 11, and 12.-In camp.

January 13.-Three hundred men and fifteen officers went on picket.

January 14 and 15.-On picket.

January 15.-Three officers and eighty-one men went on picket. Three hundred men and fifteen officers returned from picket.

January 17.-Monthly inspection.

January 18.-Three officers and eighty-one men returned from picket.

January 19 to 28.-In camp, performing usual duties.

January 29.- Brigade reviewed by Brevet Brigadier-General Gregg, commanding.

January 30.-In camp.

January 31.-Fifteen officers and 300 men went on picket.

Two drills a day have been had whenever the weather would permit.

February 1 and 2.-On picket.

February 3.- Relieved from picket.

February 4.-Received marching orders.

February 5.- Marched with division to Dinwiddie Curth-House, via Reams’ Station. Crossed Hatcher’s Run at Malone’s Bridge. Surprised and captured a wagon train and a small squad of prisoners on Boydton plank road. Countermarched and returned to near Malone’s Bridge; camped at 11 p. m.

February 6.-Took up line of march 2 a. m.; marched to Gravelly Run. Formed line of battle. Brisk skirmish commenced 10 a. m. Regiment not engaged till 2 p. m. Relieved at dark and camped.

February 7.-In line of battle from morning till night.

February 8.-Moved by way of Yellow Tavern to Reams’ Station. Picketed the Reams’ Station and Dinwiddie roads. Relieved 9 p. m.; camped near Yellow Tavern.

February 9.-Returned to camp.

February 10 to 18.-In camp.

February 19, 20, and 21.-On picket.

February 22.-Returned to camp.

February 23 to 28.-In camp.

March.-In winter quarters during the month up to 28th. Guard mounting, dress parade, and drill kept up as regular as practicable.

March 29.-Broke camp.

March 31.-Participated in engagement at Dinwiddie Court-House, Va.

April 1.-In action near Cat Tail Creek, Va., and marched to within two miles of Boydton plank road.

April 2.-Marched to near Sutherland’s Station, via Ford’s Station.

April 3.-Marched to Namozine Creek.

April 4.-Marched, via Amelia Court-House, to Jetersville.

April 5.-In action at Amelia Springs.

April 6.-In action near Sailor’s Creek.

April 7.-In action near Farmville; p. m. marched to Prospect Station.

April 8.-Marched to near Appomattox Station.

April 9.-In action near Appomattox Court-House.

April 10.-Marched to Prospect Station.

April 11.-Marched to Sandy River via Prince Edward Court-House.

April 12.-Marched to Burkeville Junction.

April 13.-Marched to Nottoway Court-House.

April 14, 15, and 16.-In camp.

April 17.-Marched to near Ford’s Station.

April 18.-Marched to Petersburg.

April 19 to 23.-In camp.

April 24.-Marched to Dinwiddie Court-House.

April 25.-Marched to within twenty-eight miles of Boydton, on Boydton plank road.

April 26.-Marched to within on mile and a half of Boydton.

April 27.-Marched to and cross Staunton River at Russell’s Ferry.

April 28.-Marched to South Boston; crossed Dan River.

April 29.-Marched to and crossed Staunton River at Moseley’s Ferry.

April 30.-Marched to and crossed the Meherin River. Camped on Lynchburg Court-House road.

TWENTY-FIRST PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

February 5, 6, and 7.-Regiment participated in a move on the left at Hatcher’s Run.

February 8.-Returned to camp; casualties, 2 men wounded.

February 25.-Regiment was transferred from Third Brigade to Second Brigade per Special Orders, Numbers 40, paragraphs V, dated February 25, headquarters Second Division, Cavalry Corps.

March 29.-Regiment broke camp in front of Petersburg, Va.; was engaged in skirmish at Dinwiddie Court-House, Va.; then moved to Malone’s Bridge, Stony Creek, to picket till April 1.

April 1.-Regiment crossed Stony Creek, Va., near Dinwiddie Court-House.

April 5.-Was engaged in battle at Amelia Springs, Va.

April 7.-Engaged in battle at Farmville.

April 9.-Engaged in battle at Appomattox Court-House.

Third Brigade, Second Division.

[January.]-The brigade has not been in any action during the month; has been doing picket duty most of the time.

January 2.-The Thirteenth Regiment Ohio Cavalry joined this brigade.

February 5, 6, and 7.-The brigade participated in the engagement at Hatcher’s Run.

March 1.-Lying in camp on the Jerusalem planed road until the 21st.

March 21.-Reported to General Parke; was relieved, and went into camp again the 27th.

March 29.-Broke camp and marched to Dinwiddie Court-House.

March 30.-Rained hard all day; lay in camp.

March 31.-Pickets driven in; brigade moved out and drove the enemy back and held the ground until toward night, when the enemy charged in force and drove the brigade back from its position. Casualties, 230.

April 1 and 2.-Brigade on picket near Dinwiddie Court-House. Afternoon of 2nd instant moved near Sutherland’s Station.

April 3 and 4.-Brigade marched toward the Richmond and Danwille Railroad, via Dennisville, the Old Court-House, and Jenning’s Ordinary, where we halted for two hours; thence to Jetersville, where we found traces of the enemy. Dismounted a part of the brigade and remained in position until dark.

April 5.-Supported the First and Second Brigades, and part of the command being engaged, dismounted, with the enemy at Amelia Springs.

April 6.-Marched parallel to and in sight of Lee’s train until about 11 a. m. A part of the brigade was ordered to charge the train. The charge was pressed vigorously forward through almost impenetrable woods and thickets. Found the enemy so strong at that point that it was impossible, to reach the train. Later in the day secured another position on Lee’s flank and charged him, mounted and dismounted. Succeeded in breaking his lines, capturing general officers, many prisoners, wagons, &c.

April 7.-On the road at 6.30 a. m. Marched rapidly, overtook the rear of the enemy’s retreating column at Briery Creek. Dismounted a portion of the brigade and drove them from the cree, making a crossing for the rest of the command, skirmishing during the day and pressing the enemy back rapidly to Farmville, where they were charged and driven in confusion back from the city, capturing a large number of prisoners. In the afternoon crossed the Appomattox. Remained in position supporting battery. At night the river; marched rapidly to Prospect Station, reaching it at 2 o’clock next morning.

April 8.-Marched to Appomattox Station; bivouacked at 8 p. m. At 9 p. m. ordered to advance to Appomattox Court-House and hold the road leading to Lynchburg. Succeeded in gaining the road, and remained in position during the night.

April 9.-Was attacked at daylight by the enemy in force, but succeeded in delaying them until the infantry got into position, and they were obliged to surrender.

April 10.-Marched to Prospect Station.

April 11.-Escorted Lieutenant-General Grant to Burkeville Station.

April 13.-Marched to Nottoway Court-House.

April 17.-Marched to Ford’s Station.

April 18.-Marched to Petersburg.

April 24.-Marched by way of Boydton plank road through Dinwiddie Court-House across Nottoway River.

April 25.-Marched to Meherrin River.

April 26.-Marched all day; bivouacked near Baydton.

April 27.-Marched to Staunton River; crossed on ferry-boats, bivouacking about dark.

April 28.-Marched to and crossed the Dan River at South Boston. News of Johnston’s surrender received.

April 29.-Started at 7 a. m. on the back track; crossed the Staunton River just after dark.

April 30.-Recrossed the Meherrin; bivouacked after dark.

Distance marched during the month, 433 miles.

ARMY OF THE SHENANDOAH.*

First Cavalry Division.

[January.]-The First and Reserve Brigades of the division in camp during the mont at Camp Russell, picketing the line of the Opequon, sending frequent reconnaissances toward Front Royad and Strasburg.

January 28.-A picked detachment of 300 men, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hastings, marched, via Devil’s Hole, to Columbia Furnace and Edenburg; surprised enemy’s picket and captured 16 prisoners and horses.

During the month the Second Brigade was stationed at Lovettsville, Loundon County, Va., picketing and guarding the Potomac. On the night of the 17th camp of one regiment (Sixth New York Cavalry) was attacked and Lieutenant Carroll, Sixth New York, and several men wounded. The enemy were repulsed with sever loss.

February 1 to 26.-The First and Reserve Brigades in camp at Camp Russell, Va., picketing the line of the Opequon, sending out frequent reconnaissances toward Strasburg and Woodstock, Va.

February 1 to 23.-The Second Brigade stationed at Lovettsville, picketing and guarding the Potomac.

—————

* Or Sheridan’s Cavalry Command.

—————

February 24.-The Second Brigade broke up camp at Lovettsville and marched to Harper’s Ferry, W. Va.

February 25.-Marched to Winchester, Va., and joined the division at Camp Rusell, Va.

February 27.-The division started on a raid up the Shenandoah Valley in the direction of Lynchburg, and marched via Strasburg to Woodstock.

February 28.-Marched to Lacey’s Spring, near New Market, and encamped.

March 1.-The division marched from Lacey’s Spring to near Staunton, and encamped. First Brigade marched to and destroyed railroad bridge at Christian’s Creek. Twentieth Pennsylvania Cavalry marched to Swoope’s Depot, on Virginia Central Railroad, and destroyed depot, stores, &c.

March 3.-Marched to Waynesborough and destroyed iron railroad bridge, stores, artillery wagons, &c.; crossed Blue Ridge, and encamped at Ivy Station, on Virginia Central Railroad.

March 4.-Marched to Charlottesville and encamped.

March 6.-Marched to Scottsville and destroyed mills, aqueduct, &c.

March 6 to 12.-Operated on the line of James River and Kanawha Canal, destroying the canal for a distance of 100 miles for Duguidsville to Goochland, together with all locks, bridges, mills, factories, and canal boats loaded with commissary, quartermaster’s, ordnance, meal, and all kinds of Government stores.

March 13.-Marched to Tollersville and destroyed railroad.

March 14.-Marched to Taylorsville and destroyed five railroad bridges over North and South Anna and Little Rivers, engaging the enemy and capturing three guns.

March 15.-Moved across South Anna to Hanover Court-House, and returned at night across North Anna.

March 16.-Marched to Mangohick Church.

March 17.-Marched to Pamunkey, at White House.

March 18.-Crossed Pamunkey and encamped.

March 25.-Marched toward James River.

March 26.-Crossed James River and encamped.

March 27.-Crossed Appomattox and encamped in front of Petersburg.

March 29.-Marched to Dinwiddie Court-House.

March 30.-Marched to and engaged the enemy near Fiver Forks.

March 31.-Engaged the enemy near Five Forks.

April 1.-The division engaged the enemy at Five Forks and carried the position, capturing 1,000 prisoners and 2 guns.

April 2.-Marched to and cut South Side Railroad attacked and drove Fitz Lee’s cavalry division to Scott’s Cross-Roads, engaging at that place the enemy’s infantry.

April 3.-Marched to Deep Creek and encamped.

April 4.-Marched to Drummond’s Mills and engage the enemy’s infantry and cavalry. At 10 p. m. marched toward Jetersville, arriving at 10 a. m. of the 5th; division placed in position in front of the town.

April 6.-Marched to and engaged the enemy at Sailor’s Creek, capturing 500 prisoners.

April 7.-Marched by Prince Edward Court-House to near Prospect Station and encamped.

April 8.-Marched to Appomattox Station and engaged the enemy.

April 9.-Engaged the enemy in front of Appomattox Court-House; at 11 a. m. flag of truce resulting in the surrender of General Lee’s army.

April 10.-Marched to Prospect Station.

April 11.-Moved by easy marches to Petersburg, encamping four days at Nottoway Court-House.

April 18.-Arrived and encamped near the town until the 24th, when the division moved rapidly in the direction of North Carolina.

April 29.-Arrived at the line, when the news of Johnston’s surrender was received, and the division countermarched toward Petersburg.

First Brigade, First Cavalry Division.

[January.]-Brigade in winter quarters on Romney pike, two miles and a half from Winchester, and picketing the right of the line held by the army.

Second Brigade, First Cavalry Division.

January 1.-The brigade marched from Halltown to Lovettsville, and commenced building winter quarters.

January 17.-The camp of Sixth New Cavalry was attacked by White’s cavalry, who were repulsed with severe loss. The country was scoured to an beyond Purceville by scouting parties.

February 1 to 24.-The brigade was quartered at Lovettsville, Loudoun County, Va., picketing and scouting in the vicinity.

February 24.-Marched to Haper’s Ferry, W. Va.

February 25.-Marched to Winchester, Va.

February 27.-Marched to Woodstock, Va.

February 28.-Marched to New Market, Va.

March 1.-Marched from Lacey’s Spring, and arrived at Staunton at midnight.

March 2.-Marched through Fisherville and Waynesborough.

March 3.-Marched through Hillstown and Brownsville, destroying a large amount of rebel quartermaster’s stores at Swope’s Station.

March 4.-Marched to Charlottesville.

March 5.-Destroyed the Lynchburg railroad.

March 6.-Marched to Scottsville, destroying the canal, aqueduct, factories, &c., returning to Howardsville.

March 7.-Marched to Warminster, destroying the canal, &c.

March 8.-Marched to Hardwickville, destroying several canal locks and warehouses. At 12 m. received orders to proceed to Columbia, via Howardsville and Scottsville.

March 9.-Arrived there at 5 a. m., marching fifty miles, destroying the canal and several boats loaded with stores for the rebel army.

March 11.-Marched to Goochland Court-House; engaged the enemy, capturing several prisoners and burning the jail and several canal locks. Returned to Columbia.

March 12.-Marched to Tolersville.

March 13.-Marched to Frederick’s Hall, and destroyed the Virginia Central Railroad.

March 15.-Passed through Taylorsville and crossed the South Anna River.

March 16.-Marched to Mangohick.

March 17.-Marched to King William Court-House.

March 18.-Arrived near White House Landing.

March 19.-Crossed Pamunkey River.* * *

March 26 [25].-Marched to near Harrison’s Landing.

March 27 [26].-Crossed James River at Deep Bottom.

March 28 [27].-Joined Army of the Potomac near Petersburg.

March 29.-Marched to Dinwiddie Court-House.

March 30.-Engaged the enemy near Five Forks.

March 31.-Fought the enemy (Pickett’s division) all day at Five Forks.

April 1.-Engaged the enemy’s cavalry and a division (Pickett’s) of infantry at Five Forks, and after seven hours’ hard fighting, captured their works, with 2 pieces of artillery,- battle-flags, and over 1,000 prisoners.

April 2.-Gained the South Side Railroad; engaged the enemy at Scott’s farm.

April 3.-Marched to near Dennsville.

April 4.-Attacked the enemy near Finney’s Mills; fought until late, and marched all night.

April 5.-Marched to near Burkeville.

April 6.-Attacked the enemy’s wagon train and fought all day, capturing a number of prisoners, and encamped near Sailor’s Creek.

April 7.-Marched through Prince Edward Court-House and encamped near Prospect Station.

April 8.-Engaged the enemy near Appomattox Court-House; skirmishing all night.

April 9.-Engaged the enemy at daybreak and fought until 10 a. m., when General Lee surrendered his army.

April 10.-Returned to Prospect Station.

April 11.-Returned to near Prince Edward Court-House.

April 12.-Returned to near Burkeville Station.

April 13.-Returned to Nottoway Court-House.

April 14, 15, and 16.-Remained in camp.

April 17.-Marched to near Ford’s Station, on South Side Railroad.

April 18.-Marched to near Petersburg and encamped.

April 19 and 20.-Remained in camp.

April 21.-Moved in camp.

April 22 and 23.-Remained in camp.

April 24.-Marched at 6 a. m. on the Boydton road.

April 25.-Marched to Meherrin River.

April 26.-Marched to near Boydton.

April 27.-Marched to Abbyville.

April 28.-Crossed the Staunton River.

April 29.-Recrossed the river and encamped.

April 30.-Marched to near Keys’s Station, on Danville railroad.

Reserve Brigade, First Cavalry Division.

January 4.-Received orders from division headquarters to go into winter quarters.

January 6.-Colonel Crownishield returned from leave and assumed command of brigade.

January 12.-Major McKendry, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, four officers and 200 men, went on reconnaissance to Strasburg, returning same day; reported no indications of enemy.

January 15.-Brigadier-General Gibbs relieved from command of division (by return of Brevet Major-General Merritt) and assumed command of brigade.

January 17.-Brigade reviewed and inspected by Brevet Major-General Merritt (present, Major-General Emory, Brevet Major-General Torbert, and Brigadier-General Fessenden.)

January 18.- Brigadier-General Gibbs, on fifteen days’ leave of absence; Colonel Crownishield, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, temporarily commanding brigade.

January 20.-One hundred and seventy-six recruits and remounted men joined the Second Massachusetts Cavalry from Pleasant Valley, Md.

January 21.-The Second U. S. Cavalry started for Hagerstown, Md., pursuant to orders, to relieve the Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

January 22.-Ninety-three recruits joined the Sixth U. S. Cavalry.

January 26.-Colonel Crownishield, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, commanding division; Captain Rumery, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, commanding brigade.

January 29.-The Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry reported from Hagerstown, Md. Major Leiper, Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry, assumed command of brigade.

January 31.-Colonel Crowninshield relieved from command of division by Colonel Stagg, First Michigan Cavalry, and assumed command of brigade.

February 1.-The brigade formed with corps and was reviewed by Major-General Sheridan; Colonel Crownishield, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, in command of brigade. Furnished the usual number of officers and men for picket duty during the month.

February 27.-Started with fifteen day’s rations, under command of Brigadier-General Gibbs, at 7 a. m., up the Shenandoah Valley, moving with the First and Third Division and First Brigade of the Second Division; traveled thirty miles and encamped at Woodstock.

February 28.-Marched to Laurel [Lacey’s] Spring, and encamped at 3.30 a. m. on March 1.

March 1.-Moved from camp at Laurel [Lacey’s] Spring with corps and continued with it, passing through Staunto, Waynesborough, and Rockfish Gap, in Blue Ridge, Brooksville, to Charlottesville.

March 3.-The First Rhode Island Cavalry was sent to Winchester, Va., as a part guard of prisoners and guns captured by Third Division at Wayenesborough.

March 6.-The brigade, as a part of First Division, was sent to Scottsville, New Market, and Bent Creek bridge, returning, via Howardsville, to Scottsville. The brigade participated largely, in the destruction of property, while the division was burning mills, warehouses, factories, forges, and Confederate stores and subsistence of all kinds, as well as working vigorously in destroying the James River Canal, locks, boats, &c. Again moved with corps and passing through Columbia, Tolersville, Frederick’s hall Junction, Taylorsville, to South Anna River. Bridges on Richmond and Petersburg [Fredericksburg] and Virginia Central Railroad were destroyed.

March 14.-The fifth United States and Second Massachusetts Cavalry captured three pieces of artillery, turning them on the enemy.

March 15.-Moved across the river and remained in position, skirmishing with the enemy. Squadron of Second Massachusetts Cavalry sent to Hanover Court-House.

March 16.-Marched through Chesterfield Station, Manghohick Church, Aylett’s, King William Court-House, to White House, arriving at 2 p. m. March 18.

The trip from Winchester to White House was fatiguing to both horses and men in the utmost degree, the command marching over the very worst of roads, without transportation and scantily supplied with subsistence. Its results, however, are apparent to all, and fully compensate the suffering experienced.

March 19.-Crossed the river and remainder in camp until March 25, when the command marched to near Petersburg, arriving March 27.

March 29.-Left camp in front of Petersburg.

March 30.-The [brigade], being in advance, fought the enemy near Fiver Forks all day.

March 31.-The enemy’s infantry, in large numbers, attacked the brigade about 1 p. m., breaking connection between it and the First and Second Brigades, First Division. The brigade fought dismounted until night-fall, falling back, with the corps, to near Dinwiddie Court-House, opposed to Pickett’s division of infantry. The brigade lost heavily in officers and men this day. Bivouacked near the Court-House.

April 1.-Moved through Dinwiddie Court-House and participated in attack on enemy’s works at Five Forks, the whole line advancing at 2 p. m. The brigade fought dismounted, and did its full share in the good work of that day. the Five Forks were carried by Devin’s (First) division of cavalry.

April 2.-Moved to South Side Railroad; destroyed track, and, with corps, moved west, skirmishing with enemy at Exeter Mill again on the 4th.

April 6.-Fought enemy at Sailor’s Creek.

April 8.-Overtook enemy; skirmishing, when the whole brigade went on picket.

April 9.-Attacked enemy (dismounted) early and vigorously, but as vigorously repulsed by a division of infantry. The line being relieved by the Corps, brigade was mounted and charged with on right of Third Division, until near the enemy’s wagon train, when a flag of truce was received. From that bourn the brigade has done no fighting. During the twelve day’s campaign, which terminated so gloriously in Lee’s surrender, the brigade fought and marched by day and night, fully appreciating what was required of it, and assisted to the best of its ability in the vigorous prosecution of that portion of the war which reflects so much credit on all, from the lieutenant-general commanding the army to the rank and file of Sheridan’s cavalry.

April 10.-Moved, with corps, by easy marches to Petersburg, encamp- ing four days at Nottoway Court-House, arriving April 18. Remained in camp, refitting, &c., until the 24th. Moved early, marching rapidly for five days to near South Boston, Va.

April 20.-The Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry was taken from brigade for temporary duty at corps headquarters, and is not yet relieved (April 30).

April 29.-News of Johnston’s surrender having been received, the corps countermarched en route to Petersburg.

April 30.-Encamped, with seventy-three miles yet to travel. The First U. S. Cavalry permanently detailed as General Sheridan’s escort.

Second Cavalry Division.*

February.-No movements.

[March.].-The division was encamped near Winchester, Va., during the month, with no general movement.

April 4.-The division broke camp near Winchester and proceeded on a reconnaissance as far as Edenburg.

April 6.-Returned.

April 7.-Went into camp near Berryville, Va.

—————

* Of the Department of West Virginia.

—————

April 20.-Broke camp at Berryville and marched to Washington, D. C., arriving there on the 22nd.

April 23.-Went into camp at Falls Church, Va., since when no more movements have been made.

Third Cavalry Division.

[January.]-The division is in winter garters on Romney pike, near Winchester, Va.

[February.]-Division in winter quarters on the Romney pike, near Winchester, Va.

February 28.-Marched at 6 a. m., reaching Woodstock at 7 p. m.

March 1.-Encamped at Lacey’s Spring, nine miles north of Harrisonburg, Va. At 3 p. m. moved toward Staunton; met rebel cavalry under General Rosser at Mount Crawford. Had a skirmish and drove them; captured 5 commissioned officers and 37 men, and a number of wagons loaded with supplies. Moved rapidly to within four miles of Staunton, and bivouacked for the night.

March 2.-Moved, via Staunton, no Waynesborough, where the enemy were met under General Early. Engaged and whipped him, capturing 11 pieces of artillery, 1,450 prisoners, and about 150 wagons loaded with quartermaster’s, commissary, and ordnance stores. Command moved to Greenwood Depot, on the Virginia Central Railroad, and burned large quantities of supplies and several railroad cars loaded with munitions of war.

March 3.-Moved to Charlottesville.

March 4 and 5.-Remained at Charlottesville; command employed in destroying railroad property.

March 6, 7, and 8.-Marched to New Market, on James River, destroying canal.

March 12.-Marched to Frederick’s Hall Depot, on Virginia Central Railroad.

March 13.-Commenced destroying large amount of Government stores, Virginia Central Railroad, tobacco, and munitions of war.

March 14 and 15.-Moved along Virginia Central Railroad to South Anna River bridge.

March 16, 17, and 18.-Moved, via King William Court-House, to White House Landing, on Pamunkey River. Remained here refitting until the 25th, then moved in the direction of Petersburg.

March 27.-Arrived at Petersburg.

March 29.-Moved toward Dinwiddie Court-House; arrived there at 3 p. m.

March 31.-Participated in the fight with the division of rebel infantry commanded by Picket and Johnson.

[April.]-The command took part in the campaign which resulted in the defeat and surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia (rebel), General R. E. Lee commanding.

Third Brigade, Third Cavalry Division.

[February.]-Brigade in winter quarters.

February 28.-Marched at 6 a. m., reached Woodstock at 7 p. m. and encamped.

March.-February 27, this command took part in the expedition which left Winchester, Va., under command of Major General P. H. Sheridan.

March 26, [27]. Reached the Army of the Potomac in front of Petersburg, Va.

March 28[29].-Resumed march.

March 31.-Engaged with the enemy at Dinwiddie Court-House.

[April.] The command took part in the campaign which resulted in the surrender of the enemy’s army, called Army of Norther Virginia, at Appomattox Court-House.

Engagements.-April 1, Five Forks, April 3, Sweat-House Creek.

April 6, Harper’s Farm. April 8, Appomattox Station. April 9, Appomattox Court-House.

Third Brigade, Third Cavalry Division.

[February.]-Encamped near Winchester, Va.

February 27.-Command started on raid up the Senandoah Valey, Va. Encamped on the night of the 27th at Woodstock, Va.

February 28.-Marched to Lacey’s Spring and encamped for the night.

March 1.-Brigade encamped at Lacey’s Spring, nine miles north of Harrisonburg, Va., and at 3 p. m. moved toward Staunton. At North River, near Mount Crawford, Va., met and drove rebel cavalry under General Rosser, capturing 5 commissioned officers and 37 men prisoners of war, and a quantity of wagons loaded with supplies. Moved rapidly to within four miles of Staunton and encamped for the night.

March 2.-Moved by way of Staunton to Waynesborough, where, in company with the remainder of the Third Division, we met and whipped the forces of General Early, killing a number of the enemy and capturing 11 pieces of artillery 1,420 prisoners, about 150 wagons loaded with quartermaster’s, commissary, and ordnance stores. This brigade then moved to Greenwood Depot, on the Virginia Central Railroad, and burned large quantities of supplies and several railroad cars laden with munitions of war.

March 3.-Moved to Charlottesville.

March 4 and 5.-Remained at Charlottesville; command employed in destroying railroad property.

March 6, 7, and 8.-Marched to New Market, on James River, destroying Charlottesville and Lynchburg Railroad and James River Canal.

March 9 and 10.- Marched to Columbia, on James River, destroying canal.

March 12.-Marched to Frederick’s Hall Depot, on Virginia Central Railroad.

March 13.-Command destroyed Virginia Central Railroad and large amount of Government stores, tobacco, and munitions of war.

March 14 and 15.-Moved along Virginia Central Railroad to South Anna River bridge.

March 16, 17, and 18.-Moved, via King William Court-House, Va., to White House Landing, on Pamunkey River. Command remained at this point refitting until the 25th, when in moved in the direction of Petersburg, where it arrived on the 27th.

March 29.-Marched toward Dinwiddie Court-House, where it arrived at 3 p. m. on the 31st, participating in the fight with the divisions of rebel infantry commanded by Picket and Johnson.

April 1.-Marched dismounted from near Dinwiddie Court-House to Five Forks, where the enemy were found in strong force. An engagement was at once opened, which continued with great fury until 5 p.m.,

when the Second and Fifth Corps of infantry came to the assistance of the cavalry and the enemy was driven rapidly at all points, losing heavily in men, artillery, small-arms, and munitions of war generally.

April 2.-This brigade moved to Ford’s Station, on the South Side Railroad, were it met and drove a body of rebel cavalry. The direction of march was then changed and the command marched to Namozine Creek, where it encamped for the night, going into camp under heavy artillery fire from the enemy.

April 3.-Marched at 5 a. m., the enemy having withdrawn from our front during the night. At Winticomack Creek met three divisions of rebel cavalry, commanded by Major-Generals Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser and Colonel Munford. After some hard fighting, the enemy was driven at a rapid rate for three miles to Deep Creek. Here the command came upon the enemy’s infantry. After some hard fighting, both partied withdrew and went into camp. This brigade during the day captured about 300 prisoners, besides killing and wounding quite a number of the enemy.

April 4.-The command marched at 5 a.m. in the direction of Amelia Court House. Countermarched at 8 p. m. and marched during the night to Jetersville, Va., where it arrived at 6 a. m. on April 5. The command remained here all day.

April 6.-Marched at 6 a. m. to Sailor’s Creek, where it met the enemy and engaged him, fighting all day driving the enemy and capturing 7 pieces of artillery 5,000 prisoners, and a large quantity of wagons, &c.

April 7.-Marched through Prince Edward Court-House and encamped five miles west of the Court-House.

April 8.-Marched to Appomattox Station, on South Side Railroad, where the command arrived at 5 p. m. Met the enemy and engaged him to once.

April 9.-Engaged the enemy at daylight at Appomattox Court-House, and was pressing him heavily when he (the enemy) raised the white flag and asked for terms of surrender, which was the commencement of capitulations ending in the surrender of Lee’s (rebel) army.

ARMY OF THE JAMES.

DEFENSE OF BERMUDA HUNDRED.

January 23.- In the evening the rebel gun-boats came down the James and one of them succeed in getting down as far as Battery Sawyer, at Crow’s Nest tower. The darkness of the night prevented accurate artillery practice. Daylight showed three of them-two iron-clads and one wooden gun-boat-around on Farrar’s Island, below Howlet House Battery. The third shot from a 100-pounder at Battery Parsons entered the magazine of the wooden gun-boat and blew her up. The iron-clads took a very severe fire, being struck many times by shot from our heavy guns, until about 12 m., when they floated off and took shelter behind Farrar’s Island until night, when they proceeded back up the river. The gun-boats did not reply to the fire of our batteries, merely firing a farewell shot as they first floated off and moved up the river.

February.-Nothing of importance transpired on this front; 135 deserters from the enemy came in during the month.

TWENTY-FOURTH ARMY CORPS.

[January.]-The Twenty-fourth Army Corps still occupies the same position since last return. The Second Division is still absent on an expedition under Byt. Major General A. H. Terry to Wilmington, N. C. March 27.-The First and Independent Divisions, Battery B, First United States, Battery A, Fifth United States, and the Seventeenth New York Independent Battery were withdrawn from the north side of James River, leaving the Third Division to keep the lines. The troops marched all night and all the next day (28th), and arrived in camp in rear of the Second Corps about sundown.

March 30.-In the morning occupied the line vacated by the Second Corps.

April 1.-The First Division of the corps (Brigadier-General Foster) was engaged with the enemy at Hatcher’s driving them from their position and moving down the right to Petersburg until the main works outside the outside city were reached.

April 2.-Assaulted Forts Gregg and Baldwin-the former carried after a desperate struggle by the First Division. the latter, by Third Brigade, Independent Division, Brevet Brigadier-General Harris.

April 3.-Found Petersburg evacuated, and immediately took up line of march close on the retreating forces of General Lee, and from, this date until the 5th was engaged in the rapid pursuit of his fleeing forces.

April 6.-Met the enemy strongly entrenched at Rice’s Station, and before our lines could be formed and the enemy’s picket be driven in, night closed the operations.

April 7.-At daylight, when about making a charge on the enemy’s works, found that he had withdrawn his force and retired toward Farmville, to which place we followed close on his rear.

April 8.-Still following the retreating column, and after marching thirty-two miles, bivouacked about three miles from Appomattox Station.

April 9.-At daylight the corps moved out and engaged the enemy at Appomattox Court-House. The Independent Division, which were on the left of the line, were about making a charge when an order arrived that there was a cessation of hostilities, and which resulted in the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. The corps was left from this dated to the 17th to settle the business of paroling Lee’s army and taking charge of all public property and sending it to Burkeville.

April 12.-The Independent Division was sent to Lynchburg, where it destroyed or carried away a vast amount of public property.

April 15.-It returned to Appomattox Court-House.

April 17.-The corps took line of march for Burkeville.

April 19.-Arrived at that place in the evening and remained until the 20th.

April 20.-the corps received orders to march to Richmond, via Amelia Court-House.

April 25.-Arrived in Richmond, where they are still encamped. Total distance marched about 225 miles.

April 2 [3].-The Third Division, under command of Brigadier-General Devens, entered Richmond, without opposition, at about 8 a. m., and occupied the city.

[May.].-This corps has been encamped near Richmond during the past month.

[June.].-The corps has been moved from its present camp during the month.

First Division.

March 27.-This division moved from the New Market road on the north bank of the James River.

March 29.-Arrived in the vicinity of Hatcher’s Run.

March 30.-Skirmishing with the enemy; advanced the Third Brigade on the left, capturing entrenched picket-line.

March 31.-Advanced the picket-line of the division, capturing that of the enemy (325 prisoners), driving the enemy into his main works, and holding the ground gained.

April 1.-Skirmishing with the enemy at Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-Broke through the enemy’s line near Hatcher’s Run, moving to the right toward Petersburg, driving them before us until the main line of works around the city was reached. At 1 p. m. assaulted Fort Gregg, which was carried after a desperate struggle. Loss in killed, wounded, and missing, 419.

April 3.-Found Petersburg evacuated, and took up line of march, following Lee’s army; encamped three miles beyond Southerland’s Station.

April 4.-Encamped at Wilson’s Station.

April 6.-Engaged the enemy at Rice’s Station, and encamped near that place.

April 7.-The enemy having withdrawn, during the night, followed, overtaking the rear guard at Bush River, where we had a short skirmish; encamped at Farmville.

April 8.-Marched thirty-three miles, bivouacking about three miles from Appomattox Station.

April 9.-Engaged the enemy at Appomattox Court-House until the cessation of hostilities, which resulted in the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. Loss, 116. Remained at Appomattox Court-House until 17.

April 17.-Marched to Prospect Station.

April 18.-Encamped at Bush River.

April 19 to 21.-Encamped at Burkeville.

April 21.-Marched and encamped at Dry Creek.

April 22.-Encamped at Amelia Court-House.

April 24.-Encamped near Manchester.

April 25.-Marched through Richmond, Va., encamping on the Brook road on the road north side.

Total distance marched, about 225 miles.

Total loss, 833 officers and men wounded, missing, and killed.

Total captured, 1,355 prisoners, 13 pieces of artillery, 5 battle-flags.

First Brigade, First Division.

[January.]-The brigade has been lying works on the New Market road near Richmond, Va., doing picket and fatigue duty.

[February.]-The brigade has been lying in works on the New Market road, near Richmond, Va., doing picket and fatigue duty.

[March.]-The brigade has been lying in works doing picket and fatigue duty in front of Richmond.

March 27-Marched to Hatcher’s Run.

March 29-Arrived there in the morning, and did picket duty the balance of the mount.

April 1.-Left encampment on Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-Participated in the capture of Fort Gregg; from thence in pursuit of Lee’s army.

April 6.-Skirmished with the enemy at Rice’s Station.

April 9.-Arrived at Appomattox Court-House, at which place Lee surrendered; moved from thence to our present encampment.

Second Brigade, First Division.

January 3.-Brigade broke camp before Richmond.

January 5.-In the morning embarked on board transports at Bermuda Landing. Brigade headquarters on board steamer General Lyon.

January 13.-Arrived off New Inlet, N. C., in the morning, and immediately proceeded to disembark, which was done in small boats, landing in the surf. Held the right of the line fronting Wilmington until 4 p. m. of the 15th.

January 15.-4 p. m., the attack having commenced on Fort Fisther, the brigade was ordered to the fort. Entered the fort at 5 p. m., and at 10 attacked that part of the works not already taken. After the work was carried, moved down the beach toward Battery Buchanan, which having surrendered, together with its force, the brigade returned to the right of the line fronting Wilmington. Remained there during the rest of the month, completing earth-works and in the time making two considerable reconnaissances toward Wilmington, capturing each time between fifty and sixty men.

Second Division.

January 2.-This division received marching orders.

January 4.-Embarked on transport at Bermuda Hundred.

January 6.-Division, with the rest of the second Wilmington expedition, sailed from Fort Monroe for Fisher, N. C.

January 13.-Arrived near Fort Fisher; disembarked same day.

January 15.-Stormed and captured Fort Fisher, with its entire garrison. Since then and up to the present time [January 31] it has been doing garrison duty at Forts Fisher and Caswell and at Smithville.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

[January.]-The monthly report for the month of December left this brigade in the trenches at Chaffin’s farm, Va.

January 3.-In the afternoon the brigade broke camp and marched to Bermuda Hundred, where it bivouacked until afternoon of the 4th.

January 4.-Brigade embarked on board transports Varuna and Tonawanda and proceeded to Fort Monroe.

January 5.-Arrived at that place at 12 m. and anchored in the harbor.

January 6.-At 4 a. m. the fleet weighed anchor and put out to sea en route for Fort Fisher.

January 13.-Arrived at Federal Point in the morning and disembarked during the day.

January 14.-The brigade was engaged in throwing up rifle-pits near the Flag-Pole Battery, and during the night was ordered to take a position in rear of Brevet Brigadier-General Curtis’ brigade, operating against Fort Fisher.

January 15.-In the morning the brigade formed line of battle in rear of the First Brigade and about 400 yards from the fort, which was successfully assaulted at 3 p. m. After the fort the brigade was ordered to move about one mile up the river, where it bivouacked for the night.

January 16.-In the morning moved down near the Flag-Pole Battery, where it remained until the morning of the 19th.

January 19.-Brigade moved over near the Cape Fear River and encamped, where it remained during the month.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

January 3.-The brigade (except the Ninth Maine Volunteers, which remained at the front in the Army of the James) broke camp and marched to Bermuda Hundred, where it bivouacked for the night.

January 4.-In the evening embarked on board transports De Molay and Thames.

January 5.-Sailed for Fort Monroe in the morning, arriving there that afternoon.

January 6.-In the morning sailed from Fort Monroe down the coast, passing Cape Henry.

January 8.-Arrived off Beaufort, N. C.

January 9.-A storm set in, continuing nearly the whole of the 10th.

January 12.-Sailed for Fort Fisher, and effected a landing on the beach about three miles above the fort on the morning of the 13th. The brigade, being the first to land, captured a battery containing one heavy gun, also forty head of cattle near it.

January 15.-Took part in the assault on Fort Fisher, which resulted in its captured at 10 o’ clock same night.

January 16.-One of the reserve magazines in the fort exploded, killing and wounding many. The One hundred and sixty-ninth New York Volunteers, being nearest, suffered the most. Since the 16th brigade has been engaged in garrisoning Fort Fisher and Battery Buchanan, and such other duties as it has called on to perform.

First Brigade, Third Division.

[January.]-During the month the brigade has been on the line on Chaffin’s farm, Va., picketing its front. The time has been occupied in drilling, equipping, &c., the command.

January 24.- When the enemy’s boats passed our batteries on the James, a few shells were thrown from Fort Gilmer into the camp.

[February.]-No events of special importance have taken place during the last month. The troops have been dong picket and fatigue duty. The time has been devoted to drilling and equipping the command.

[March.]-No events of special importance have taken place during the past month.

March 27.-The command moved from its old position and relieved the First Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, and are now picketing the front, formerly occupied by that division. The headquarters are established at the old headquarters of General Foster, commanding First Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps.

[April.]-At the commencement of the present month this command was stationed on the lines near Chaffin’s farm, Va.

April 3.-In the morning it was discovered that the enemy’s pickets had been withdrawn from our front, when we were ordered to advance up the New Market road, and entered the city of Richmond at about 8.30 a. m., being the first body of infantry to enter the city. This command was stationed in Richmond about two weeks as provost guard, when it was removed to the interior line of works west of the city, where it remained until the 24th instant.

April 24.-It was ordered across the James River, where it is now encamped on Broad Rock road, about three miles from Manchester.

The command is in a good state of efficiency. The time is occupied in drilling and equipping the command. The troops are doing light picket duty.

Independent Division.

March 26 [25] (Saturday).-This division marched from its camp at Chaffin’s farm, Va., to Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy River, to cover the crossing of General Sheridan with his command, he having crossed, however, below that point at Jones’ Bridge, and we returned and encamped near Deep Bottom on Sunday.

March 28 [27].-We received orders to cross the James River at Sunset; we marched till 3.30 o’clock Tuesday morning.

March 29.-Moved on during the day about ten miles, and took up position in rear of Fifth Corps.

March 30.-We were moved farther to the left, in rear of the lines of the Second Corps.

March 31 (Friday).-We were moved still further to the left, and went into position in front of Fort Useless, on Hatcher’s Run. While reconnoitering the enemy’s position with the commanding general, Lieutenant Judd, aide-de-camp on his staff, was severely wounded by the enemy. All day we had heavy skirmishing with the rebels, and drove their skirmishers about three-quarters of a mile.

April 1.-Heavy picket-firing in the morning in our front opposite Fort Useless, on Hatcher’s Run. The enemy attacked and were repulsed, with loss of thirty prisoners and many killed and wounded.

April 2 (Sunday).-We were moved some two miles, to the right of our position, and about 10 o’clock, with the First Division, our forces stormed and carried Fort Gregg, after a severe struggle, in which this division lost some 250 in killed and wounded. The colors of the Second Brigade of this division were the firs planted upon the captured work. The Third Brigade of this division also carried two other forts to the left and beyond Fort Gregg.

April 3.-We moved out on Cox road about eleven miles, following the retreating foe.

April 4.-We marched some fifteen miles on the road to Burkeville.

April 5.- We reached Burkeville Junction about 10.15 p.m., after a hard day’s march.

April 6 (Thursday).-We marched out from Burkeville about 1 p. m., and after going some eight miles we struck the flank of the enemy and skirmishing at once commenced. The enemy being in strong position and far superior in numbers, no assault was made, but we succeed in detaining him.

April 7.-We marched to Farmville.

April 8.-We marched sixteen hours, accomplishing a distance of thirty-two miles.

April 9.(Sunday).-We marched out about 6 a. m., and after marching about three miles we formed line of battle on the road just in time to check a cavalry charge of the rebels. We advanced about a mile under a pretty severe fire of grape and shell, skirmishing as we advanced, until word was sent to the command to cease firing, as na armistice had been agreed upon; subsequently Lee surrender his army.

[April 12.]-Wednesday, this division started for Lynchburg.

April 13.-Reached there at 8 a. m. and immediately proceeded to destroy a vast amount of munitions of war collected there by the rebels.

April 15.-This work was accomplished, and we returned to Appomattox Courth-House.

April 27.-We starlet for Richmond.

April 24.-We arrived there.

First Brigade, Independent Division.

March 25.-The brigade marched from Camp Holly to the Chickahominy River. Returned the following day, and bivouacked at Deep Bottom.

March 27.-At night crossed the James and Appomattox Rivers.

March 28.-Arrived at camp at 4 a. m. The same day marched to Humphrey’s Station and went into camp.

April 1.-The brigade repulsed an attack by the enemy near Hatcher’s Run at 4 a. m.

April 2.-A fort in front of the lines was captured by the One hundred and twenty-third Ohio Volunteers Infantry, with prisoners and artillery. The Thirty-fourth Massachusetts and One hundred and six tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry engaged in the assault of Fort Gregg.

April 6.-The One hundred and twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry was captured near High Bridge, at Farmville. The Thirty-fourth Massachusetts and One hundred and sixteen Ohio Volunteer Infantry engaged the enemy with their skirmishers near Rice’s Station.

April 9.-Was present at the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox Court-House.

April 13.-Arrived there.

Second Brigade, Independent Division.

January 28.-Moved from camp at Deep Bottom, Va., to Chaffin’s farm, Va.; distance, two miles.

January 29.-Twenty-third Regiment Illinois Veteran Volunteers temporarily attached to Provisional Brigade, commanded by Colonel W. M. McClure, on Bermuda line, per Special Orders, Numbers 29, headquarters Defenses Bermuda Hundred, Va.

[February.]-No change of headquarters or other events to record since last return.

March 25.-Marched to Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy River, Va.; distance, thirteen miles.

March 26.-Marched to Deep Bottom Landing, on James River; fifteen miles.

March 27.-At 6 p.m. began march, arriving at Humphrey’s Station, Va., on the 29th; distance, thirty miles.

March 26.-Battalion Twenty-third Illinois Volunteers rejoined brigade at Deep Landing from detached service on Bermuda line, Va.

April 1.-The brigade was engaged in skirmishing and fortifying on the line at Hatcher’s Run, Va., up to the morning of the 2nd.

April 2.-It was moved the distance of seven miles against Battery Gregg, near Petersburg, Va., in the capture of which the brigade participated with marked bravery, and was the first to plant its colors upon the works. The enemy fought with desperation after the works were entered; one commissioned officer and several men of the brigade were killed inside of the works.

April 3.-Moved in pursuit of the rebel army on the Lynchburg road.

April 5.-Arrived at Burkeville, Va.; distance, fifty-three miles.

April 6.-At 4 a. m. the Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by Lieut, Colonel A. P. Moulton, marched from camp on an expedition to High Bridge, Va., on the Lynchburg railroad, distance ten miles, where it was captured by the enemy, after a spirited fight with overwhelming numbers. At 12m. same day the brigade, now comprising the Twelfth Regiment West Virginia Volunteers and one company Twenty-third Illinois Volunteers (the other four companies of the latter were left on duty), began march.

April 7.-Arrived at Farmville, Va.; distance, fifteen miles.

April 8.-Resumed march at 6 a. m., arriving at a point west of Appomattox Court-House, heading the rebel army; distanc, thirty-two miles.

April 9.-Early in the morning General Lee surrendered. Although under fire of the enemy’s artillery, except the skirmish line we were not engaged.

April 12.-Commenced to march to Lynchburg, Va.

April 13.- Arrived there, distance twenty-six miles, reaching there early.

April 15.-Commenced march returning to Burkeville; distance, seventy-three miles.

April 19.-Reached there.

April 22.-Left Burkeville.

April 25.-Reached Richmond, Va.; distance, fifty-eight miles.

Commissioned officers killed at Fort Gregg April 2: Major Nathan Davis, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Second Lieutenant Joseph Caldwell, Company C, Twelfth West Virginia Volunteers, Wounded at Fort Gregg April 2: Second Lieutenant John A. Bridggs, Company K, acting adjutant Twelfth West Virginia Volunteers. Killed at High Bridge, Va., April 6: Second Lieutenant Cyrus Patton, Company G, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Third Brigade, Independent Division.

March 1.-The command, comprising the Tenth, Eleventh, and Fifteenth Regiments West Virginia Volunteers, was encamped at Chaffin’s farm, on the north side of James River and in front of Richmond, Va. Everything remainder quiet, and deserters coming into our lines daily.

March 25.-The command broke camp and marched to Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy River, returning next day too Dep Bottom, Va.

March 28.-Marched across the James River, and continued the march, via Point of Rocks, to the Appomattox River, and continued the march, via Point of Rocks, to the Appomattox River, crossing that stream; thence marched in rear of the defenses of Petersburg, passing the headquarters of General Meade.

March 29.-Arrived at Humphreys’ Station, on the City Point Railroad, in the morning.

March 30.-Marched in the morning, in conjunction with the remainder of the Twenty-fourth Corps and Second Corps, crossing Hatcher’s Run, where the command formed line of battle and advanced, skirmishing and driving the enemy. The rain fell heavily all day, somewhat impeding the movements of the troops. At evening the command entrenched themselves.

March 31.-In the morning the enemy opened a brisk musketry fire on our men, and finally charged our skirmish line, but were repulsed, with loss on their side. Somewhat later in the morning, General Harris, in command of the brigade, with the Eleventh Regiment West Virginia Volunteers, of his command, charged the enemy’s entrenched skirmish line and carried the position handsomely, with a number of prisoners, with very little loss on our side. Heavy skirmishing was kept up continually, but no general engagement has taken place up to the end of the mont. The losses of this command during the last two days ending the month is 3 killed, 51 wounded, and 3 missing. The whole distance marched by the command for the month is seventy miles. At the end of the month the command is still fighting the enemy, with every prospect of success. The enemy’s force is protected by formidable earth-works, with a dense slashing of felled timber in our immediate front. The number of prisoners captured by the command is nearly 100.

April 1.-The command, comprising the Tenth, Eleventh, and Fifteenth West Virginia, Volunteers, were engaged skirmishing with the enemy on Hatcher’s Run, to the left and front of Petersburg. Same night the Sixth Army Corps penetrated the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg, Va., causing him to abandon the works in our immediate front on the morning of the 2nd.

April 2.-The command, finding the enemy retreating, rushed forward on the works, capturing many prisoners, 1 battle-flag, and 2 cannon; then, in conjunction with the rest of the division, moved to the right and engaged the enemy in their forts. This command assaulted Fort Whitworth, capturing it, with little loss, the greater part of the garrison making good their escape; however, we captured 1 colonel, 2 captains, and 65 men, with a slight loss in killed and wounded. The command bivouacked for the night.

April 3.-The enemy had withdrawn when our forces occupied Petersburg, Va. The command, in conjunction with the rest of the Independent Division, took up its line of march in pursuit of the enemy, marching to the left and parallel with the South Side Railroad, via Poplar Grove Station, Welville, and Burkeville Junction; thence parallel with the Lynchburg and Danville Railroad, skirmishing some with the enemy at Rice’s Station, and pursued him toward Appomattox Station, the point where General Sheridan’s cavalry held him in check.

April 9.-Arrived there in the morning, when the command were hurried forward on the double-quick. Engaged the enemy and drove him from his position, and gained a decided advantage over him. At this time, however, it was unofficially announced to the troops that General Lee, commanding the Army of Northern Virginia, surrendered unconditionally to Lieutenant-General Grant, commanding U. S. Army. Hostilities ceased at once, both armies lay within plain view of each other the terms of surrender were adjusted. The rebel army were paroled and allowed to return to their homes unmolested and remain until exchanged. The command then went into camp, remained until the 12st of the month.

April 12.-It marched to Lynchburg, Va. The rebels at that place destroyed nearly all their artillery, but left a large quantity of provisions, which was distributed to the citizens of the town and vicinity.

April 15.-The command returned from Lynchburg, marching, via Concord and Appomattox Depots, to Farmville; thence to Burkeville Junction.

April 19.-Arrived at latter place in the morning.

April 22.-Broke camp and marched parallel with the Richmond and Danville Railroad, via Amelia Court-House.

April 25.-Arrived and marched through Richmond, and were received by the Third Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, General Devens. The command proceeded about two miles outside the city and went into camp, where it remains at the end of the month, the whole distance marched by the command for the month of April being 259 miles. The entire loss of the command in the different engagements during the month of April was 5 killed and 54 wounded. The whole number of prisoners captured during the month, 6 officers and 100 men, together with 1 battle-flag and 2 pieces of artillery.

Artillery Brigade.

BATTERY F, FIRST RHODE ISLAND ARTILLERY.

April 3.-Broke camp near Chaffin’s farm, Va.; moved to the city of Richmond; encamped in the suburbs.

BATTERY E, THIRD NEW YORK ARTILLERY.

[April.]-Remained in position at Camp Holly.

BATTERY H, THIRD NEW YORK ARTILLERY.

[April 3.]-Broke camp on New Market road; arrived at and encamped in the northern suburbs of the city same day.

April 14.-Moved camp to west side of the city, where it is at present date [April 30.]

BATTERY K, THIRD NEW YORK ARTILLERY.

April 3.-Broke camp on New Market road; moved to the northeastern suburbs of the city, where thy are encamped.

BATTERY M, THIRD NEW YORK ARTILLERY.

April 3.-Broke camp near Deep Bottom, Va., and advanced to Richmond, where it encamped in the northeastern suburbs.

SEVENTH NEW YORK BATTERY.

[April.]-Remained on Bermuda front during the month.

SEVENTEENTH NEW YORK BATTERY.

March 26.-Broke camp at Signal Hill, Va., moving with the Twenty-fourth Army Corps.

March 29.-Reached Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-Engaged and moved to the rear of Petersburg.

April 3.-Marched toward Burkeville.

April 5.-Arrived there.

April 6.-Left Burkeville; engaged near Rice’s Station.

April 7.-Moved toward Appomattox Court-House.

April 9.-Arrived there.

April 17.-Left Appomattox Court-House.

April 25.-Arrived at Richmond, where it went into camp near headquarters Twenty-fourth Army Corps.

BATTERY A, FIRST PENNSYLVANIA ARTILLERY.

April 3.-Broke camp near Chaffin’s farm, Va., and moved to the suburbs of the city of Richmond, where it encamped.

April 27.-Moved to Manchester, Va., where it is at present date [April 30.]

BATTERY B, FIRST U. S. ARTILLERY.

April 2.- Left Hatcher’s Run and advanced to Petersburg with First Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps; was placed in position on skirmish line.

April 3 to 5.-Followed the enemy on line of South Side Railroad.

April 6.-Engaged him at Rice’s Station, Va.

April 7 and 8.-In pursuit of the enemy.

April 9.-Engaged him at Appomattox Court-House. The engagement ended in the surrender of Lee’s army.

April 24.-Arrived at Richmond, Va., and encamped near headquarters Twenty-fourth Army Corps.

BATTERY L, FOURTH U. S. ARTILLERY.

[April.]-Remained at Signal Hill, Va., during the month.

BATTERY A, FIFTH U. S. ARTILLERY.

March 27.-Broke camp on New Market road; moved with Twenty-fourth Army Corps.

March 29.-Reached Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-Moved to rear of Petersburg.

April 3.-Moved toward Burkeville.

April 5.-Arrived there.

April 6.-Left Burkeville; arrived at Rice’s Station same day.

April 7.-Left Rice’s Station.

April 9.-Was engaged at Appomattox Court-House.

April 17.-Left Appomattox Court-House.

April 25.-Arrived at Richmond; encamped near headquarters Twenty-fourth Army Corps.

BATTERY F, FIFTH U. S. ARTILLERY.

April 3.-Broke camp on New Market road; marched to Richmond. Va., encamped on Hunt’s Hill.

April 7.-Changed camp to Oakwood Cemetery, where it is as present date [April 30].

TWENTY-FIFTH ARMY CORPS.

[January.]-Since last return the following changes have been made in the organization of the corps: The number of the First Division is now Third, and the Third changed to the First Division, by virtue of General Orders, Numbers 8, from headquarters, dated December 31, 1864. The Forty-first U. S. Colored Troops taken from Second Brigade, First Division, and placed in First Brigade, Second Division; the One hundred and seventeenth U. S. Colored Troops taken from First Brigade, Second Division, and placed in Second Brigade, First Division, by virtue of General Orders, Numbers 2, from these headquarters, dated January 2, 1865. The One hundred and fifteen U. S. Colored Troops has been added to the corps, according to instructions from department headquarters, and assigned to the Second Division. During the month Brigadier General C. A. Heckman has been in command, Major-General Weitzel being absent with leave. A portion of the Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General C. J. Paine, forms a part of the expeditionary force that sailed from Fort Monroe, Va., January 6, under command of Brevet Major-General Terry. No official report of its operations has as yet been received. The remaining troops of the corps have participated in no general engagements during the month.

January 23 and 24.-The command was got under arms early in the morning, anticipating a move on the part of the enemy. All remained quiet, however, during the 23rd.

January 24.-In the morning the enemy’s rams came down the James River. They were fired upon from our batteries, to which briskly replied. In the evening of the same day they were successful in returning.

The Second Division occupies Fort Burnham and a portion of the line in front of Richmond. The left of the line held by this division was severely bombarded, January 24, resulting in four casualties.

[February.]-Nothing worthy of special note has occurred during the month. The corps holds the same line at Chaffin’s farm, Va., as per last return. The Third Division remains in the Department of North Carolina. The First and Second Divisions have drilled each day.

[March.]-The corps holds the same position (at Chaffin’s farm, Va.) as per last return. No change of special note have occurred except that-

March 27.-The Second Division, commanded by Brigadier Gene. William Birney, moved to re-enforce the Army of the Potomac, near Hatcher’s Run.

[April .]-March 27, the Second Division moved to re-enforce the Army of the Potomac. April 17, it rejoined the corps near Petersburg.

April 3.-That portion of the corps (First Division and Artillery Brigade) remaining at Chaffin’s farm, Va., moved upon the evacuation of Richmond and took of the city, where it remained until the 13th instant, performing in and around the city the usual guard and fatigue duties.

April 13.-Moved to South Side Railroad, about three miles from Petersburg, and have remained at this station to the end of the month.

[June.]-May 25 to June 17, the corps embarked in ocean transports at City Point as rapidly as transports could be furnished.

June 7.-The headquarters of the corps embarked and proceeded toward Texas; put into Mobile Bay, Ala., to receive orders from the major-general commanding Military Division of the Gulf, and to coal and water, if possible; coal could not be obtained.

June 16.-Arrived at New Orleans, La., and coaled; the proceeded to Brazos Santiago, Tex.

June 21.-Arrived there. The Second Division had previously arrived in Texas; the headquarters of the division and the Second Brigade stationed at Brazos; Third Brigade at White’s Ranch; Firs Brigade had received orders to garrison Indianola.

june 26.-First Division arrived at Brazos, and was ordered to Brownsville, Tex., but owing to the rise of water in the Rio Grande overflowing the low country, it could not reach that place. It is encamped at White’s Ranch awaiting the fall of water, as river transportation cannot be furnished.

The cavalry and unattached infantry brigade have not arrived; only Battery B, Second U. S. Colored Light Artillery, has as yet arrived.

First Division.

[January.]-This division’s number was changed from Third Division to First Division in accordance with General Orders, Numbers 8, headquarters Twenty-fifth Army Corps, December 31, 1864. Nothing of importance transpired during the month.

[February.]-No change during the month worthy of note.

First Brigade, First Division.

[May.]-The brigade remained quiet in camp of instruction during the month with the exception of the last two days.

May 30.-It embarked on transport bound for Texas.

[June.]-May 30 to June 22, the brigade was upon transports bound for Texas. On the latter date they disembarked at Brazos Santiago, Tex., and marched ten miles toward Brownsville, halting at White’s Ranch, on the banks of the Rio Grande, where it remained four days.

June 27.-Marched ten miles farther through mud and [water] waist deep, occasioned by the overflow of the Rio Grande.

June 28.-Marched ten miles farther and encamped within six miles of Brownsville, where we remained one day.

June 30.-Marched to Brownsville in the morning.

The brigade is now [June 30] encamped close to the town, and is engaged in laying out camp and getting into shape for drills, &c.

Second Brigade, First Division.

[February.]-This brigade has been in camp in the trenched all the month in same place as last month until the 25th, when it was moved three quarters of a mile to the rear in reserve, except the One hundred and seventeenth U. S. Colored Troops, which still remains in the defenses near Fort Burnham.

Third Brigade, First Division.

[January.]-The brigade remained during the month in the same position as at the close of the last mont.

[February.]-The brigade remains in the same position as at the close of January, and has taken part in no important movement.

Second Division.

[February.]-Since last month this command has remained in camp near Chaffin’s farm, Va. The position of the Second and Third Brigades have been changed. The division now occupies the entire front of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps.

March 25.-This division marched from the works near Fort Burnham, no the north side of the James River.

March 27.-At night crossed James River at Aiken’s Landing and Appomattox River at Broadway Landing.

March 29.-Took position near Hatcher’s Run, southwest of Petersburg about six miles, remaining in that position until the 31st instant.

April 1.-Remainder in line of works near Hatche’s Run.

April 2.-In the morning advanced and took possession of the enemy’s line, they evacuating; immediately marched toward Petersburg; passed through the city and along the Cox road in pursuit of the enemy, continuing the march until the 10th instant.

April 10.-Orders were received to return to Petersburg.

April 11.-Commenced the return march in the morning.

April 17.-Reached the outskirts of the city, and have since then remained in camp near the city.

May 26.-The troops broke camp at Camp Lincoln, Va., and marched for City Point. The same day embarked and sailed for Hampton Roads, arriving at that place about 1 p. m. Lay at anchor in the Roads till 10.30 a. m. May 31.

May 31.-Weighing anchor, proceeded to sea, bound for Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, Ala. Wheather calm and clear.

June 8.-Fleet put into Mobile Bay for the purpose of coaling and watering.

June 10.-Weighed anchor.

June 13.-Arrived off the coast of Texas, the First Brigade landing at Indianola, and the Second and Third Brigades at Brazos Santiago.

June 24.-The Third Brigade moved to White’s Ranch, on the Rio Grande.

First Brigade, Second Division.

[January.]-Remained in camp during the month near Fort Burnham, Va.

[February.]-Remained in camp, near Fort Burhnam, during the month.

[March.]-Marched from the works on the north side of James River near Fort Burnham to south side of said river near Hatcher’s Run. The One hundred and fifteenth U. S. Colored Troops remained in camp near Fort Burnham.

April 1.-The brigade remained in the works near Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-In the morning advanced and took possession of the enemy’s works, they evacuating. Immediately pushed into Petersburg, arriving there at noon, and took up position on the right of division.

April 3.-Shortly after daylight took possession of the city and marched out on the Cox road, halting at night.

April 4.-Resumed the march in the morning, and at noon received orders to move back to a place called Sutherland’s; remained there until the afternoon of the 5th.

April 5.-In the afternoon we were relieved and started to rejoin the division.

April 10.-Joined the division near Appomattox Court-House.

April 11.-Started back to Petersburg.

April 17.-Arrived there, and since that time have remained in camp near that city. (See report appended.*)

May 7.-Brigade marched from Petersburg, Va., to vicinity of City Point, Va., where it remained in camp, employed in drilling, &c., until the 25th.

May 25.-It embarked on transports and proceeded to Hampton Roads, Va.

[June.]-May 26, brigade sailed from Hampton Roads, with orders to rendezvous at Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay.

June 7 and 8.-It arrived there.

June 9.-Received orders to proceed to Indianola, Tex., via the Southwest Pass, Mississippi River.

June 12.-Anchored off the bar, but were unable to disembark on account of the wind blowing so violently, causing a very heavy sea to break upon the bar.

June 17.-Coal and water being nearly exhausted, were obliged to return to Southwest Pass.

June 19.-We again arrived there, and upon being supplied with coal and water, returned.

June 25.-Arrived off the bar the second time; disembarked Sunday, and are now [June 30] garrisoning the city of Indianola, Tex.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

March 27.-The brigade marched from Fort Burnham.

March 29.-Arrived at Hatcher’s Run.

March 30 and 31.-It participated in the operations against the enemy’s lines.

April 1.-The brigade was all day in line of battle in front of the enemy near Hatcher’s Run.

April 2.-Marched inside the enemy’s works to near Petersburg, and in the afternoon was engaged.

April 3.-Entered Petersburg before day, being the first Union troops in. Marched nine miles westerly on the Cox road.

April 4.-Marched to Wilson’s Station.

April 5.-Marched to Blacks and Whites.

April 6.-Marched through Burkeville to within seven miles of Farmville, and bivouacked near the enemy.

April 7.-Marched to Farmville, where Brigadier-General Birney was relieved from the command of the division, and the brigade was ordered to report to Brigadier General R. S. Foster, commanding First Division, Twenty-fourth Corps.

April 8.-Marched till midnight, having traveled thirty miles.

April 9.-Marched at 3 a. m. to the Lynchburg road west of and near Appomattox Court-House. At 7 a. m. engaged the enemy, who was driving our cavalry; stopped him and drove him some distance.

April 10.-Reported to Bvt. Brigadier General R. H. Jackson, assigned to command the Second Division, Twenty-fifth Army Corps.

April 11.-Marched for Petersburg.

April 17.-Reached our camp-ground west of the town.

June 18.-Arrived at Brazos Santiago, Tex., and have been here ever since.

—————

*Page 1234.

—————

Third Brigade, Second Division.

[February.]-The camp of this brigade has been changed from their position to the rear and right of Fort Burnham to the line of breast-works between Batteries Nos. 3 and 5. Twenty-eight U. S. Colored Troops are at City Point on detached service.

[April.]-This brigade took part in the campaign with the forces operating against the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Lee.

April 9.-The capitulation having been consummated at Appomattox Court-House, the command returned to Petersburg.

April 17.-Arrived there at night. The troops were frequently exposed to the enemy’s shell, but they being so inaccurate the casualties were light. The long and fatiguing march was borne with patience and fortitude creditable to old soldiers, and should forever put an end any doubt as to whether colored troops can stand a campaign however severe it may be.

May 25.-In compliance with orders, dated headquarters Second Division, Twenty-fifth Army Corps, May 24, the Third Brigade marched from Camp Lincoln, Va., to City Point, Va., where the troops were embarked on the following steamers, viz, Wilmington, William Kennedy, Nightingale, Prometheus, and Montauk, and the same day proceeded to Hampton Roads, Va.

May 26.-The arrived and anchored in the roads in the morning.

May 31.-Received orders, dated headquarters Second Division, Twenty-fifth Army Corps, May 30, to proceed to the vicinity of Fort Gaines or Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, and there await further orders. Put to sea at 10 a. m.; passed Cape Henry light at 12 a. m. same day.

June 9.-The brigade arrived off Fort Morgan, Ala.; same date put to sea for Brazos Santiago, Tex., via the mouth of the Mississippi River.

June 13.-Came to anchor outside the bar at Brazos Santiago.

June 15.-Ordered to Arkansas Pass, Tex., and put to sea for that place.

June 16.-Arrived off Arkansas Bar; strong gales from the southeast; seven feet of water on the bar, rendering it impossible to disembark the troops. The fleet being short of coal and water was obliged to proceed to Galveston, Tex., the nearest point, for supplies.

June 18.-Arrived off Galveston Bar.

June 19.-Went into the wharf; took in supplies of coal and water.

June 21.-Put to sea.

June 22.-Arrived at Brazos Santiago.

June 24.-In the morning all the troops were disembarked, and on the night of the same date marched to present encampment at White’s Ranch, on the Rio Grande River, Tex.

Third Division.

[January.]-The number of the division was changed from First to Third per General Orders, Numbers 8, headquarters Twenty-fifth Army Corps, December 31, 1864. The One hundred and seventh [U. S. Colored] Regiment was transferred from the Third to the First and the Twenty-seventh [U. S. Colored] from the First to Third Brigade by General Orders, Numbers 5, headquarters First Division, Twenty-fifth Army Corps December 31, 1864.

January 3.-Division headquarters, the Second Brigade (with the Thirtieth [U. S. Colored] Regiment temporarily attached), the Third Brigade (with the First [U. S. Colored] Regiment temporarily attached), left camp on the north side of the James and proceeded to Bermuda Landing.

January 4.-Embarked on transports.

January 5.-Sailed on the second expedition for Fort Fisher.

January 12.-Arrived of Fort Fisher at night.

January 13.-Disembarked and constructed a line of entrenchments across the peninsula facing Wilmington.

January 15.-The division this line during the assault upon Fort Fisher by General Ames’s division.

First Brigade, Third Division.

[January.]-During the month the First and Thirtieth U. S. Colored Troops, of this command, have been on detached service in the Wolmington expedition. The remainder of the brigade has been in the defenses before Richmond.

[February.]-During the month the First and Thirtieth Regiments, of this brigade, have been engaged in the operations around Wilmington.

February 20.-The remainder of the command embarked on transports for Fort Fisher.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

January 3.-The brigade left camp at Chaffin’s farm, Va.

January 4.-Embarked on transports at Bermuda Landing at night.

January 13.-Landed near Fort Fisher, N. C.; constructed and occupied the center of the north line of defenses.

January 18.-The brigade made a reconnaissance to Sugar Loaf.

January 19.-Made another [reconnaissance]. Lieut, Colonel C. J. Wright, Thirty-ninth U. S. Colored Troops, was wounded; also Captain N. J. Hotchkiss, Sixth U. S. Colored Troops.

January 21.-Captain Hotchkiss died at Fort Fisher.

Cavalry Brigade.

May 14.-The Cavalry Brigade was organized by virtue of Special Orders, Numbers 130, paragraphs V and VI, headquarters Twenty-fifth Army Corps, May 14, 1865, at Camp Lincoln, Va., but consisting of only two regiments, viz, the First and Second U. S. Colored Cavalry Regiments.

May 30.-The Fifth Massachusetts Colored Cavalry was assigned to the brigade by virtue of Special Orders, Numbers 146, headquarters Twenty-fifth Army Corps, dated May 30, 1865.

June 10, 11 and 12.-The cavalry brigade embarked on ocean steamers at City Point, Va.

June 13.-Arrived at Fort Monroe.

June 16.-Sailed from Hampton Roads. Fleet comprising brigade consisting of five vessels, steamers General McClellan, Meteor, Ashland, H. S. Hagan, and Dudley Buck. Touched at Fort Morgan for orders; thence to South West Pass, Mississippi River, for coal and water.

June 28.-Sailed or Brazos Santiago, Tex., arriving at anchor the p. m. of the 30th.

Artillery Brigade.

June 1 to 7.-The brigade embarked at City Point different periods between these dates-Battery B, Second U. S. Colored Artillery, on the steamer Suwanee; Battery D, First U. S. Artillery, and Battery D, Fourth U. S. Artillery, on the Neptune; and Battery M, First U. S. Artillery, on the steamers Rappahannock and Beafort. The vessels sailed separately as soon as they were loaded and ready for sea, the last steamer leaving City Point on the 7th instant. The left rendezvoused at Mobile, and from there proceeded to New Orleans, La., for coal and water.

U. S. FORCE AT FORT FISHER, N. C.

January 3.-The command moved from the camps of the Army of the James, in front of Richmond, Va., to Bermuda Hundred, embarking at that point on the day following for Fort Monroe.

January 6.-Left Fort Monroe for Beaufort, N. C., arriving at that point, after a stormy passage, o the 8th.

January 12.-Left Beaufort for Federal Point, N. C.

January 13.-Disembarked on the beach five miles above Fort Fisher.

January 15.-Assaulted and captured Fort Fisher, with its entire garrison of over 2,220 men, after a heavy bombardment from the fleet, the Second Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, Byt. Major General A. Ames commanding, making the assault, supported by the Second Brigade, First Division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, the Third Division, Twenty-fifth Army Corps, holding a defensive position two miles and a half from the fort against the anticipated attack of Hoke’s division of the rebel army, which ended in a mere demonstration.

January 16.-The forts at the west entrance of Cape Fear River (abandoned by the enemy) were occupied by the navy, and soon after garrisoned by a portion of this command.

The remainder of the month was occupied in repairs of Fort Fisher and building wharves for landing stores, and occasional reconnaissance proving Hoke’s division to be entrenched in a strong position at Sugar Loaf Hill, where it remained at the close of the month.

FERRERO’S DIVISION.

April 2.-In the morning, in accordance with instructions from Major-General Hartsuff, commanding Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, a battalion of the Tenth New York Artillery attacked the enemy’s line, and succeeded in carrying it and holding the same until the object of the reconnaissance (which was to ascertain whether the enemy had with-drawn troops from Bermuda front) had been accomplished, when it fell back to its original position.

April 4.-The division moved to Petersburg, Va., since which time the division has been doing duty as provost guard and picketing the approached to the city.

First Brigade, Ferrero’s Division.

April 3.-This brigade (which was reported on last monthly return as First Brigade, Infantry Division, Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, Va.), early in the morning, after having sent out reconnoitering parties, who reported that the enemy had evidently just evacuated his works on our front, advanced across the enemy’s line and proceeded onward

in the direction of Chesterfield Court-House, Va., capturing scattered parties of rebel soldiers and a band belonging to a brigade Mahone’s division, and receiving numbers of deserters who delivered themselves up, all of whom were turned over to the division provost-marshal. No large force of the enemy was met with. A halt was made at Chesterfield Station, on the Richmond, and Petersburg Railroad.

April 4.-A detachment, under charge of Lieutenants Michener and Haines, of General McKibbin’s staff, was sent forward to the vicinity of the coal-fields, where three locomotives and a quantity of cars were captured and brought safely to Petersburg.

April 5.-The division of which the brigade forms a part marched to Petersburg, Va., via Broadway Landing, and since that period the brigade has been stationed in the defenses of that city and guarding the approached thereto.

By order, the designation First Brigade, Infantry Division, &c., was changed to First Brigade, Ferrero’s Division, &c.

U. S. FORCES, CITY POINT, VA.

April 2.-The Tenth and Twenty-eight U. S. Colored Troops marched from Fort Harrison to Bermuda Hundred.

April 3.-In the morning marched back and took up line of march for Richmond, where they arrived at 9 a. m. Remained there until evening of the 6th, when they were ordered, with their command, to assume command of City Point, va.

May.-Nothing of any event occurred at this post during the month.

SUB-DISTRICT OF THE APPOMATTOX.

April 30.-Marched thought Mecklenburg to Mill Grove; crossed the Meherrin, and bivouacked after dark.

May 1.-Moved at 6 a. m.; marched through Lunenburg Court-House, thence, via Lunenburg plank road, across the Nottoway, bivouacking at 5 p. m.

May 2.-Marched at 6 a. m., via Blacks and Whites, to near Five Forks; bivouacked at 5.30 p. m.

May 3.-Moved at 6 a. m.; marched through Petersburg, across the Appomattox, and went into camp near Ettrick about 5 p. m.

Distance marched during the month, seventy-five miles.

General Smith was assigned to the command of the Sub-District of the Appomattox by Special Orders, No. 135, Department of Virginia, and the brigade was assigned for duty in the said sub-district by General Orders, Numbers 1, headquarters District of the Nottoway.

May 21.-Sent detachment First Maine Cavalry, under command of Captain H. C. Hall, to Chesterfield Court-House; also detachment of Thirteenth Ohio Cavalry to Amelia Court-House, under command of Lieutenant Colonel S. R. Clark; also detachment of same regiment, under command of Captain R. C. Campbell, to Powhatan Court-House; also detachment Second New York Mounted Rifles, under command of Lieutenant Colonel J. H. Wood, to Buckingham Court-House; also detachment same regiment, under command fo Captain J. C. Terry, to Cumberland Court-House.

The several commanding officers were appointed provost-marshals in their respective counties, and continued to do provost duty to the end of the month.

June.-The duties of this command during the month: Doing provost duty in the several counties composing the sub-district.

MILITARY DISTRICT OF LYNCHBURG, VA.

May 1.-Left Moseley’s Ferry and marched toward Blacks and Whites; moved to within two miles and camped.

May 2.-Moved toward Petersburg, Va., on the Red Oak road; camped.

May 3.-Moved into and through Petersburg; crossed Appomattox River, and went into camp.

May 4 to 8.-In camp.

May 9.-Moved through Petersburg, on the Cox road, to Ford’s Station; camped.

May 10.-Marched to Nottoway Station; camped.

May 11.-Marched via Burkeville and drew forage and rations; camped.

May 12.-Marched through Prince Edward Court-House; camped at Pamplin’s Station.

May 13.-Marched to Concord.

May 14.-Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry was sent to Lynchburg.

May 16.-Twenty-fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry sent to Appomattox Court-House.

May 17.-The headquarters and Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry moved to Lynchburg, Va.

May 19.-Eight Pennsylvania Cavalry moved to Lynchburg; the command encamped near fair ground.

May 22.-Twenty-first Pennsylvania moved to Lynchburg from Appomattox Court-House. Details of the command performing duty as provost guard in the following [counties] of the district: Appomattox, Campbell, Amherst, Bedford, Nelson, and Franklin.

May 30.-Two hundred and sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Colonel H. J. Brady, reported for duty by authority of Special Orders, Numbers 138, dated headquarters Department of Virginia, May 22, 1865. The command is performing guard duty in the city-Lynchburg.

Twelfth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry and detachment Twentieth New York Cavalry, under command of Lieutenant Colonel T. E. Barker, with headquarters at Danville, Va., are performing duty at that place and in the following-named counties: Patrick, Henry, and Pittsylvania.

[June.]-Command in camp, garrisoning city of Lynchburg and the counties comprising the Military District of Lynchburg.

CAVALRY DIVISION.

March 1 to 28.-This division lay in camp before Richmond, engaged in picketing, scouting, and performing the various duties incident to a cavalry command while in the presence of, but not engaging with, the enemy.

March 28.-Left camp.

March 29.-Bivouacked in the morning near Varina Station, on the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, continuing the march after a short roast to Humphreys’ Station; halted till night and again marched to the crossing of Rowanty River, in the vicinity of Reams’ Station, where it has since been engaged as guard to the trains of the Army of the Potomac.

Byt. Major General A. V. Kautz, commanding the division, was relieved on the 20th by Special Orders, Numbers 79, headquarters Department of

Virginia, and was succeeded by Brigadier General R. S. Mackenzie, U. S. Volunteers, who was assigned to the command by Specila Orders, Numbers 79, headquarters Department of Virginia, March 20, 1865. The First New York Mounted Rifles was detached from this command by orders from headquarters Department of Virginia, dated March 23, 1865. The Fourth Wisconsin Battery was also temporarily detached from the command March 28, 1865.

In consequence of this reduction the command was on the 28th, previous to leaving for the field, consolidated into two brigades, the Third Brigade, Colonel A. W. Evans, being merged with the Second Brigade of this division, under the command of Colonel S. P. Spear, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Second Brigade, Cavalry Division.

January.-The brigade has been engaged during the month in performing picket duty, scouting, drilling, and officers’ recitations. No change in the headquarters of brigade or regiment.

February.-The brigade has been engaged during the month in performing picket duty, scouting, drilling, and officers’ recitations. No change in the headquarters of brigade or regiments.

CAVALRY BRIGADE.

April 1.-The command left the vicinity of Reams’ Station, Va., where it had been on duty as guard to the wagon trains of the Army of the Potomac. Proceeded to Dinwiddie Court-House and reported to Major-General Sheridan.

April 3.-The command moved to Appomattox at two points, the lower at Leonard’s Mills, the other three miles higher up the stream, picking up 300 prisoners and taking 4 guns.

April 4.-The command crossed Deep Creek after a sharp skirmish.

Prince Edward Court-House to Appomattox Station, skirmishing considerably on the road.

April 12.-After the surrender of General Lee’s army, the command was ordered to Lynchburg, Va., where it remained until the 16th instant, engaged in paroling prisoners and destroying munitions of war.

April 16.-The command moved, via Burkeville and Goode’s Bridge, to Richmond, Va., where it arrived on the 24th instant, going into camp on the Mechanicsville road, where it has since remained.

[May.]-This brigade has remained in camp on the Mechanicsville road, about three miles north of Richmond, Va., during the entire month. It has been engaged in performing the ordinary routine of camp duties, in furnishing patrolling parties and guards to different parts of the adjoining country. The Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry was detached and ordered to Charlottesville, Va., on the 5th instant, but still remains under the orders of the brigade commander. The Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry was assigned to this brigade on the 23rd instant by Special Orders, Numbers 139, extract 4, headquarters Department of Virginia.

[June.]-The brigade has remained in camp about three miles south of Richmond during the month. It has been engaged in performing the ordinary routine of camp duties and in furnishing patrolling parties and guards to different parts of the adjoining country. The Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry is on detached service at Charlottesville, Va., and the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry on detached service in Henrico County.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pages 72-148

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: