Number 96. Appomattox Report of Lieutenant Colonel Edward L. Witman, Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Infantry

   

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in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 96. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Edward L. Witman, Two hundred and tenth Pennsylvania Infantry.1

HEADQUARTERS 210TH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS,
April 10, 1865.

MAJOR: In obedience to circular from brigade headquarters of this date, I have the honor to forward a statement of operations in which this regiment was engaged on March 31, 1865.

We broke camp on the morning of the 31st of March about daylight, and marched about two miles to the right of the enemy’s lines, and massed in an open field on the right of the brigade, during a heavy rain. The skirmish line was attacked, and we were ordered forward.

We deployed, moved forward about 200 yards, and entered the rifle-pits to the skirmish line. We were attacked by a superior force of the enemy on the left flank and in front when we fell back. Colonel Sergeant, Lieutenant Shlesinger, adjutant, and two other officers were wounded just as the regiment broke. Two other officers, missing, are supposed to be wounded and in the hands of the enemy. We retreated about a mile, when we rallied and advanced, driving the enemy over the ground we had lost, and camped that night about 6 o’clock, where we laid until 1.30 a. m. April 1.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. L. WITMAN,
Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding 210th Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Major H. GAUSE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS 210TH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS,
April 12, 1865.

MAJOR: In obedience to circular from brigade headquarters of this date, I have the honor to forward a statement of operations in which this regiment was engaged on the 1st of April, 1865.

About 1.30 a. m. we broke camp and marched about eight miles in the direction of Dinwiddie Court-House and halted about two hours, when we proceeded about two miles toward the enemy’s works and formed in line of battle. By order of General Gwyn the One hundred and fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers was attached to this command and posted on our left. We then marched in line of battle about one-quarter of a mile before opening fire, which brought us to the edge of the woods in which the enemy was posted, when sharp musketry firing commenced. We were ordered forward, and drove the enemy from his works, whom we followed for about two miles, until the regiment became scattered. About 5 o’clock the Fifth Corps assembled in a field near the works captured from the enemy, marched to the rear, near where the battle commenced, and went into camp for the night.

On making out our field return we discovered that we had sustained a loss of 1 enlisted man killed, 28 wounded, and 8 missing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. L. WITMAN,
Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding 210th Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Major H. GAUSE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 878-879

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