Number 80. Appomattox Reports of Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Myers, One hundred and eighty-seventh New York Infantry

   

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No. 80. Reports of Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Myers, One hundred and eighty-seventh New York Infantry.1

HDQRS. 187TH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
April 19, 1865.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with Special Orders, Numbers 74, headquarters Army of the Potomac, dated April 14, 1865, I have the honor to transmit the following report:

On the 29th of March left camp near Humphrey’s Station with brigade, and in the evening formed line in the rear of One hundred and eighty-ninth New York Volunteers, supporting the First Brigade, which was engaged; lay under a brisk fire of musketry and artillery, bud had no casualties. March 30, moved out to support of Third Brigade; formed line in their rear; lay all day under a fire of artillery; no casualties. March 31, formed line in rear of Second and Third Divisions, fighting at Gravelly Run; advanced with brigade, and took part in retaking ground lost by Second and Third Divisions; threw up a line of breast-works, and remained in them until morning, when we received orders to march; in this day’s operations we lost six men wounded. April 1, moved with brigade, and about 2 p. m. was ordered to form my regiment as flankers on the right of the division, to cover the right and connect with skirmish line in front; advanced with them, my movement being guided by that of the skirmish line. The skirmish line halted, and I soon ascertained that the skirmish line had been broken by cavalry, and hearing that the division was engaged, and there being already troops on our right and front, so that it would not leave the right exposed, we reformed, and, together with the One hundred and eighty-ninth New York Volunteers, moved forward, hoping that we might arrive in time to get into action, but when we arrived we found the firing had ceased and the day was won. We reported to General Gregory at once, went into works that night, and laid there until noon Sunday, April 2. On that day we marched until dark, nothing of importance occurring. Moved out with brigade Monday morning, and after marching until noon was ordered by General Gregory to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Fitzhugh, commanding a part of Artillery Brigade, Fifth Corps, for escort to return and go by another road. Marched until 12 p. m., and having caught up with the rear of the corps, the artillery going to move at 4 a. m., and my men being very tired, I asked to be and was relieved from duty with the artillery. Marched at 5 a. m., caught up with the corps, and marched in rear of Second Division, and caught up and reported with my regiment to General Gregory about 4 p. m.; marched with them until dark, threw up a line of breast-works that night, and remained in them until the morning of the 6th. On the 5th were ordered out of works to assist cavalry, but did not go far before we were ordered to return. On the 7th marched all day till 8 p. m.; men kept up well, nothing of importance occurring. Marched on the 8th all day until 12 p. m; went into bivouac, with orders to march at 4 a. m. Marched at 5.30 a. m., formed a line of battle about 8, and advanced, holding the left of the first line, when the news of the proposed surrender of Lee’s army was received. Went into bivouac about 4 p. m.

The enlisted men of the command are entitled to credit for the alacrity and willingness with which they obeyed all commands, and only falling out on the march when completely worn out.

To Adjt. Carl Zentz I owe much for the valuable assistance rendered me. Had it not been for this officer my duties would have been much more laborious. The officers, with a few exceptions, were constantly with and urging on their men to their duty, and I must here specially mention Captains Loeb and Wagner, to whom I am indebted in a great measure for the good behavior of the regiment on the march and while under fire.

I am, captain, very respectfully,

DANIEL MYERS,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding 187th New York Volunteers.

Captain H. G. DENNISTON,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Second Brig., First Div., Fifth Corps.

HDQRS. 187TH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
April 14, 1865.

In compliance with orders from headquarters First Division, Fifth Army Corps, dated April 13, 1865, calling for reports of the operations of this command from the morning of the 1st to the 5th of April, I have the honor to transmit the following:

On the morning of April 1 received marching orders, and started about 6 a. m., and about 2 o’clock came upon Second Division, Fifth Corps. This regiment was ordered to form on the right of the division as flankers, to connect with skirmish line and advance with them. Advanced, and when the engagement became general we laid on the flank; in a short time I ascertained the division was engaged, and formed my regiment, together with the One hundred and eighty-ninth New York Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Townsend commanding, and pushed forward to the front. This was, however, not done until we were certain of there being troops on our right. We did not arrive in front in time to become engaged. Were ordered to hold line of works that night, and remained in them until noon Sunday. Marched Sunday until night, nothing of importance occurring. Monday morning resumed the march; after marching some six miles I received an order to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Fitzhugh, commanding Artillery Brigade, Fifth Corps, to escort him by some other road. Started back, escorted the artillery, marched until 12 p. m. that night, having taken the artillery to the corps. I p ut my men in camp at 12 p. m., and at 6 a. m. on the morning of the 4th I took up the line of march to rejoin the brigade. Marched in rear of the Second Division until 4 p. m., when I rejoined the brigade. Went into the woods near Jetersville Station and threw up a line of breast-works that night, working details of men all night. Remained in the works until the morning of the 7th.

I am, captain, very respectfully,

DANIEL MYERS,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Captain H. G. DENNISTON,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 856-857

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