Number 73. Appomattox Report of Captain J. Webb Adams, Tenth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery

   

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in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 73. Report of Captain J. Webb Adams, Tenth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery.1

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MASSACHUSETTS BATTERY,
Near Burkeville Station, Va., April 15, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the morning of March 29, at 6 a. m., as per order from Artillery Brigade headquarters, I reported with my battery to Brigadier-General Hays, commanding Second Division, Second Corps, and by him was placed in position to the left of my old camp, near the Tucker house, covering the right of the Second Division. At 4 p. m. was ordered to move my battery up to the field near Dabney’s Mill; did so, and was at once ordered back no my old position. Was not engaged this day. No loss of men or horses. March 30, moved up to the field near Dabney’s Mill, and remained in park during the day and night. No loss of men or horses. March 31, at 1 p. m. moved up to the Crow house and went into position on the right of Battery B, First Rhode Island Artillery, on the line of the Second Division. At dark drew out and marched to the left to near Hatcher’s Run, and went into park in rear of headquarters Artillery Brigade. No loss of men or horses. April 1, remained in park all day. No loss to-day. April 2, went into position at 4 a. m. on the Boydton plank road, on the line of the Third Division, Second Corps. Engaged the enemy at about 7 a. m., expending ninety-seven rounds of ammunition, when it was discovered that the enemy was retreating, and our troops advanced (my battery marching with the Second Division) toward Petersburg. A little past noon started for Wells’ Church with the Second Division, where we arrived at dark, and encamped for the night. No loss to-day. April 3, marched at 6 a. m. with the Second division toward Petersburg. When about half way there halted for an hour or more; then turned back and started for Lee’s retreating

army on the road leading to Lynchburg. Marched till past midnight; then parked in a field by the roadside. The roads very heavy and the horses much fatigued. To-day three horses died; lost no men.

April 4, continued our march with the Second Division, and at dark went into park for the night. No loss of men or horses. April 5, harnessed and hitched in at 1 a. m., but did not march till 6 a. m.; rived at the railroad at Jetersville at 4 p. m. and went into park at dark; one section was placed in position on the left of the Fifth Corps, where it remained during the night; not engaged. No loss of men to-day; one horse died. April 6, marched at 6 a. m. The Second Division having taken the woods to the right of the road the battery marched in rear of the batteries of the Third Division. When near Amelia Springs went into position on the left of the road and shelled the enemy’s train across the creek, expending thirty-seven rounds of ammunition. Soon after continued our march and parked for the night near Sailor’s Creek. No loss of men; two horses died to-day. April 7, marched at 6 a. m. in rear of the batteries of the Third Division. Before noon reached High Bridge, on the Lynchburg railroad, where I went into position, and shelled the enemy as they retired on the other side of the river, expending sixteen rounds of ammunition. Continued our march, and at about 3 p. m. went into position on the line of the First Division, near Farmville, and shelled the enemy’s rear guard, expending thirty-four rounds of ammunition. Remained in position all night. No loss of men; two horses died to-day. Received nine new horses.

April 8, drew our of position and marched at 6 a. m., in rear of the batteries of the First Division, about one mile beyond New Store; went into park, and unhitched and unharnessed, but immediately got an order to harness and hitch in and report to General Barlow commanding Second Division, Second Corps, and with that division marched till midnight, when I parked the battery, and unhitched and unharnessed. No loss of men; four horses died to-day. April 10, remained in camp all day. No loss of men; two horses died to-day. April 11, marched at 10 a. m. on our return to Burkeville Station, the batteries marching together, mine being the fourth battery; arrived at New Store at 7 p. m. and encamped for the night. Roads very heavy. No loss of men; five horses died to-day. April,13, resumed our march at 6 a. m., and arrived at Burkeville Station at 2 p. m., and went into camp near the railroad, where the battery now remains. No loss of men; four died to-day.

Recapitulation: Horses died, 34; rounds of ammunition expended, 184; rounds ammunition abandoned, 201.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,l

J. WEBB ADAMS,
Captain, Commanding Tenth Massachusetts Battery.

Lieutenant A. M. E. GORDON,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General Artillery Brigade, Second Corps.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 794-795

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