Number 52. Appomattox Report of Colonel George T. Egbert, One hundred and eighty-third Pennsylvania Infantry

   

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in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 52. Report of Colonel George T. Egbert, One hundred and eighty-third Pennsylvania Infantry.1

Report of operations of One hundred and eighty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers from March 29 to April 9, 1865, inclusive:

The regiment left camp on morning of March 29; was transferred, by order of division commander, from First to Fourth Brigade; moved with the division, and were advanced as skirmishers in the afternoon, connecting with the right of the Fifth Corps line; about dark were relieved by One hundred and forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers and halted for the night. 30th, advanced in line of battle and halted for the night near Boydton plank road. 31st, the regiment, with One hundred and forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, were ordered to the rear to corduroy on the road from Dabney’s Mill to Boydton plank road; were employed all day; moved to the brigade about dark. April 1, moved back and occupied a line of works until about 5 p. m., when we moved out and occupied a line of works in advance until about 2 a. m. April 2, when the regiment moved to the left in rear of Fifth Corps. About 7 a. m. moved about one mile to the right and formed line of battle. About 10 a. m. marched through the enemy’s works and came upon his rear guard near the South Side Railroad. Moved by the left flank about 4 p. m. and charged the enemy, driving him and gaining possession of the railroad, with the following casualties: Corpl. William C. Hixson, Company D, Corpl. John F. Maxwell, Company E, and Sergt. George C. Warner, Company F, wounded. Marched with the brigade during the 3rd, 4th and 5th, without any particular incident. On the 6th moved a short distance and came in sight of the enemy’s rear guard; formed line of battle in support of a battery, which opened upon him. Advance during the day, closely following the enemy, but did not become engaged with him. Three prisoners were brought in by a member of the regiment. 7th, moved with the brigade, passing High Bridge; came up with the enemy; formed line of battle, and advanced, changing position during the day. A detail from the regiment as flankers became engaged, with the following casualties: Private Joseph Solomon, Company H, wounded. Twelve prisoners were brought in. 8th, marched until 6 p. m. without incident and halted. Shortly after dark were thrown out as skirmishers and advanced about five miles, capturing five prisoners; met Major Mason, of General Lee’s staff, with flag of truce. Second the night on picket duty. April 9, relieved by One hundred and fortieth Pennsylvania Volunteers and joined the brigade; marched with it. About 4 p. m. received news of the surrender of Lee’s army. Halted for the night.

Casualties: April 2, 3 enlisted men wounded; April 7, 1 enlisted man wounded; total, 4.

Respectfully submitted.

GEO. T. EGBERT,
Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

Lieutenant S. P. CORLISS,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourth Brigade.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 756

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