Number 33. Appomattox Report of Captain Patrick H. Bird, Twenty-eighth Massachusetts Infantry

   

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in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 33. Report of Captain Patrick H. Bird, Twenty-eighth Massachusetts Infantry.1

HDQRS. TWENTY-EIGHTH MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS,
April 10, 1865.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with circular from headquarters Second Army Corps, I have the honor to report that the Twenty-eighth Massa-

chusetts Volunteers broke up camp on the 29th of March, at 6 a. m., and marched with the brigade; crossing Hatcher’s Run formed a line of battle and marched through the woods all day without striking the enemy’s lines; camped at night, and resumed the march at 2 a. m. on the 30th; moved to the left a distance of about one mile and a half; moved again to the right at about 6 p. m. on the 31st. Kept moving from one point to another until the evening of April 1; were ordered to march to re-enforce General Sheridan’s cavalry, arriving our destination at 4 p. m. April 2; at 8 a. m. moved back to the right; formed a line of battle at White Oak road; moved in line of battle through the woods, and found the enemy’s works evacuated; moved down the road by the flank a distance of two miles and half; formed a line of battle and participated in the engagement near the South Side Railroad on April 2. Casualties: 2 commissioned officers and 4 enlisted men wounded. Camped at night near the road. Resumed the march at 9 a. m. on April 3; marched about twenty miles, camped at night, and marched on the 4th at 7 a. m. in a westerly direction, distance about fifteen miles. Resumed the march at 3 a. m. on the 5th, crossing the Danville and Lynchburg Railroad; camped at night, and marched on the 6th at 7 a. m. striking the enemy’s rear guard; moved in line of battle all day, and camped at night. Resuming the march at 7 a. m. [7th marched] a distance of about ten miles. On the 8th moved at 7 a. m.; marched a distance of about fifteen miles; camped at night, and resumed the march at 9 a. m. on the 9th; marched a distance of about seven miles, and encamped.

During the operations of this command from the 28th of March to the 10th of April, 1865, the battalion has neither lost nor captured any battle-flags or prisoners.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. BIRD,
Captain, Commanding Battalion.

Captain WALL,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 726-727

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