Number 153. Appomattox Report of Major General John G. Parke, U. S. Army, commanding Ninth Army Corps

   

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No. 153. Report of Major General John G. Parke, U. S. Army, commanding Ninth Army Corps.1

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,
July 10, 1865.

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command from March 29 to April 19, 1865:

After the capture and recapture of Fort Stedman, on the 25th of March, the usual state of affairs continual on the line held by this corps, with the exception that the enemy was more than ordinarily active in strengthening his intrenchments. His works from the Appomattox to in front of Fort Sedgwick were part of the old interior line of defenses, which had been so often unsuccessfully attempted by us. At a point in front of Fort Sedgwick an outer line, a kind of spur, struck off from his main line and swept down toward Hatcher’s Run in front of the left of our advance. The line held by this corps fronted the whole of this main line and about two miles of the spur. By the orders from headquarters Army of the Potomac, of March 14 and 28, ordering a grand movement of the army on March 29, I was directed to send all surplus baggage and artillery to the rear, and to be prepared to hold with this corps the then line as far as Fort Davis and the rear line from that point. This was accordingly done. I at once placed the Third Division, Brevet Major-General Hartranft commanding, at work repairing the rear line, which was much out of order. Under the skillful direction of General Hartranft this line was put in excellent condition.

At – p.m. on the 30th of March orders were received from army headquarters directing me to make an assault upon the enemy’s position in my front at 4 o’clock the following morning. The point of attack was left to my decision. I had already decided that the position in front of Ford Sedgwick, on the Jerusalem plank road, was the best one for assault on the front held my this corps. This portion of the line was held by the Second Division, Potter’s, and I accordingly concentrated in rear of Fort Sedgwick all of Potter’s division, with the exception of pickets and the garrison of the forts, and all of Hartranft’s division. But at – p.m. orders were received from army headquarters suspending the assault, and the troops were returned to their camps. No further movements occurred during March 31 and April 1.

At 4.50 p.m. April 1 I received orders from army headquarters, through Captain Worth, directing me to assault together, and, after fully examining the grounds, substantially the same arrangements for the

assault were made as had been previously made for the assault ordered for the morning of the 31st. At 9.50 p.m. orders were received by telegraph from General Meade directing me to at once open with all the artillery in my front, push forward skirmishers, and follow them with columns of assault. While arrangements were being made to carry out these orders they were modified by further instructions withdrawing the orders for instant attack, and making assault contingent on developments of weakness on the part of the enemy. We opened artillery and threw forward a strong skirmish line along the whole front. The enemy was found prepared and in full force with the exception of in front of the Second Brigade, Second Division, Brigadier General S. G. Griffin’s, between Forts Hays and Howard, when General Griffin, by a well-planned rush, succeeded in surprising and capturing about half a mile of the enemy’s picket-line, taking prisoners 8 officers and 241 men, but further movements disclosed the enemy’s main line well manned and on the alert. The demonstration developed no apparent change in the force in our front either of artillery or infantry.

In accordance with instructions to carry out the original orders to assault at 4 a.m. on April 2 the captured line was abandoned. By 1 a.m. the firing had all quieted down, and the concentration of troops for the attack was well under way. To the right of the Jerusalem plank road running through Fort Sedgwick, Hartranft’s division was massed in rear of the fort-Willcox’s First Brigade, his left one, Colonel Samuel Harriman commanding, was massed on Hartranft’s right. The Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers being left in the works to hold the brigade line, Colonel Harriman was ordered to report to General Hartranft. Potter’s (Second) division was massed on Hartranft’s left, to the left of the plank road. At 3 a.m. I established my headquarters at Fort Rice, and at the same time Generals Potter and Hartranft formed the assaulting column between our main line and picket-line without alarming the enemy, whose picket-line was in close proximity. The assaulting force was in column of regiments in the following order: On the right of the Jerusalem plank road with left resting on the road, the Third Division, the advance regiments being the Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Cox commanding; followed by the Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Morrow commanding; the Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania, Colonel Dodd commanding, and the Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Heintzelman commanding; the two remaining regiments of the division, the Two hundred and Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania, were held as reserve behind the works. On the right of this column was Harriman’s brigade of the First Division in the following order: Thirty-eighth Wisconsin, Colonel Bintliff commanding; One hundred and ninth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Pier commanding, and the Eighth Michigan Volunteers, Major Doyle commanding. The remaining regiments of the brigade, the Twenty-seventh Michigan and Thirty-seventh Wisconsin, remained in reserve in rear of the right with Hartranft’s division, Potter’s division, was formed, Griffin’s brigade in the advance, supported by Curtin’s brigade. Six regiments from the division were left to garrison the forts on its line. Storming parties, accompanied by pioneers provided with axes to clear away the abatis and chevaux-de-frise, preceded each column. Details of artillery-men to work any guns that might be captured were also in readiness.

With the view of leading the enemy astray as to the real point of attack I directed General Willcox to make a strong demonstration on

his front at 4 a.m. I judged this demonstration would most certainly deceive the enemy from the fact learned from deserters, that our main assault was expected on the Fort Stedman front. Accordingly, about 4 a.m., the artillery opened vigorously along the whole line firing for some minutes. General Willcox then promptly pushed out his skirmishers along his whole front, and was very successful in the object proposed. Colonel Bolton, commanding Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, left to hold Harriman’s brigade front, captured some of the enemy’s skirmishers near the Crater, and Colonel Ely, commanding the brigade next the river, not only carried their picket-line, but even about 200 yards of the main line, but the enemy concentrating upon him he was forced to retire after holding the position some little time. At about 4.30 a.m. the signal was given for the main attack in front of Fort Sedgwick, and the column moved swiftly and steadily forward. In a moment the enemy’s picket-line was carried. the stormers and pioneers rushed on and under a most galling fire cut away and made openings in the enemy’s abatis and chevaux-de-frise. They, now closely followed by the assaulting columns, which, undeterred by an exceedingly severe fire of cannon, mortar, and musketry from the now aroused main line, pressed gallantly on, capturing the enemy’s works in their front with 12 guns, – colors, and 800 prisoners. Colonel Harriman’s column re-enforced by the two reserve regiments swept up to the right until the whole of what was called by the enemy “Miller’s Salient” was in our possession. Potter’s column swept down to the left. This part of the enemy’s line was heavily traversed, affording him a strong foothold, and he fought from traverse to traverse with great tenacity. We drove him slowly back for about a quarter of a mile when, being re-enforced, and aided by strong positions in the rear, he checked our farther progress in that direction. A most gallant but unsuccessful attempt was made to carry his rear line. The captured guns were at once turned upon the enemy, served at first by infantry volunteers, and them by details from the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers from the batteries in the rear.

Just after we broke through he enemy’s lines, and at a most critical time, I was deprived of the valuable services of Brevet Major-General Potter, who was severely and dangerously wounded. I directed Brigadier Gene

ral S. G. Griffin to assume command of his division, and by him the division was ably and gallantly commanded during the rest of the day. It being by this time fully daylight no further attempt was made to advance, but attention was turned to securing what we had gained, and restoring the organization of the troops, unavoidably much shattered by the heavy fighting and the advance over broken ground in the darkness. This was rendered the more difficult by the great loss we had sustained in officers, especially field officers, and by my very exposed position occupied by our troops. The captured line was promptly recovered and made tenable as possible, the difficulty being increased by the forts and batteries on that line being open in the rear.

By reason of these untoward circumstances much time elapsed before I considered the troops in sufficiently good shape for another forward movement, and in the meantime I received, at 7.30 a.m., the following dispatch:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
April 2, 1865-7.26 a.m.

Major-General PARKE:

General Meade sends, for information, the following from the lieutenant-general:

“As I understand it, Parke is attacking the main line of works around Petersburg,

whilst the others are only attacking an outer line, which the enemy might give up without giving up Petersburg. Parke should either advance rapidly or cover his men and hold all he gets.

ALEX. S. WEBB,
Brevet Major-General and Chief of Staff.

At 7.45 I received the following dispatch:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OR THE POTOMAC,
April 2, 1865-7.40.

Major-General PARKE:

The general commanding directs that you hold on to all you have got, and not to advance unless you see your way clear.

ALEX. S. WEBB,
Brevet Major-General and Chief of Staff.

About this time the enemy made an attempt to get up a charge on us, but our fire was so hot that they did not get many men outside their lines. We then held a distance of about 400 yards on each side of the Jerusalem plank road, including several forts and redans. The enemy made no further movements, with the exception of being very busy planting more guns and keeping up an incessant and murderous fire of sharpshooters, until just before 11 o’clock, when he made a heavy and determined assault on the captured line, but we repulsed him at all points with much loss. It being evident to me that the enemy was resolved to regain at all hazards the portion of their lines held by us, and nearly all my reserve being in, and learning from General Wright that he was moving toward Hatcher’s Run, leaving a wide gap between us, I deemed it advisable to report the state of affairs to Army headquarters, and request re-enforcements. My request was promptly complied with, and Benham’s and Collis brigades from City Point, and Hambin’s brigade, of the Sixth Corps, were ordered to my support. The enemy continued to make heavy and desperate attempts to recapture his lost works, but without success. But though my men stood up nobly to their work this long and wearisome struggle was beginning to tell upon them. At about 3 p.m. the enemy succeeded in regaining a few of the traverses on the left, which gave them a flank fire upon a small detached work on the left of plank road, held by one of the regiments of Curtin’s brigade, and occasioned its temporary abandonment, but General Collis reporting to me with his brigade about this time I at once but him in under direction of General Griffin, and the enemy was again driven from the portion of line he had just retaken. Between 4 and 5 p.m. General Hamblin arrived with his brigade from the Sixth Corps, and I directed him to report to General Hartranft, by whom he was placed in support of the left of his line. These re-enforcements having rendered my line secure I was disposed to make another effort to drive the enemy from his position in the rear, but the exhausted condition of my troops forced me to reluctantly abandon the idea.

We accordingly strengthened ourselves as much as possible, whenever practicable transferring the enemy’s chevaux-de-frise to the front of the reversed line, and on the right connecting by a cross line the extreme point we held with our main line. Desultory firing continued nearly all night. The batteries on the right fired at intervals all night at the bridge across the Appomattox.

The troops were instructed to exercise the greatest vigilance for the purpose of detecting the expected evacuation of the enemy, or any other movements of his.

At about 2 a.m. we commenced feeling their positions with skirmishers, but found their pickets still out. At about 4 a.m. we succeeded in

penetrating their line at all points nearly simultaneously, capturing the few remaining pickets. Ely’s brigade, of Willcox’s division, was the first to enter the town, near the Appomattox, and to Colonel Ely to formal surrender of the city was made by the authorities; and at 4.28 a.m. the flag of the First Michigan Sharpshooters was raised on the court-house, and guards were posted throughout the town.

The document surrendering the city accompanies Colonel Ely’s report.* General Willcox’s dispatch announcing the occupation of the city was transmitted by me to the commanding general at 5 a.m.

The enemy had fired the bridge, but by the prompt efforts of our officers and troops the main structure was saved, and skirmishers were pushed across the river and picked up numbers of stragglers. Many stragglers were captured in the city and outskirts.

Receiving instructions from the major-general commanding to move in pursuit of the retreating enemy with two divisions, leaving one to garrison the city, I accordingly directed Brevet Major-General Willcox to assume command of the city, and garrison it with his division. Being directed to follow the Sixth Corps, on the River road, I moved out behind it with Griffin’s Hartranft’s divisions, and kept closed onto General Wright’s rear till after dark, when we camped in the vicinity of Sutherland’s, some ten miles from the city.

On the next day, April 4, we moved at daylight, still following the Sixth Corps until about 3.30 p.m., when I received a dispatch from the general commanding, directing me to move over to the Cox road with my command, and continue on that road, guarding the trains and picketing the railroad up to the rear of the army. This I accordingly did, moving forward as the army moved, scouting and picketing well to the southward to guard against any incursion from that quarters, until the surrender of the rebel army, when my command was stretched from Sutherland’s to Farmville. Affairs remained in this situation until the night of the 19th of April, when I received orders to move my command to Washington via City Point.

In accordance with these orders the corps was started at daylight on the 25th, and its connection with the Army of the Potomac ceased.

To my division commanders, Generals Willcox, Potter, Hartranft, and Griffin, and to Brevet Brigadier-General Tidball, chief of artillery, my thanks are due for the ability and faithfulness with which they discharged every duty imposed upon them.

I cannot speak in too high terms of conduct of both officers and men of the corps in this closing campaign of the army. In the long and terrible struggle of April 2 they behaved with a gallantry and steadiness which reflects the greatest credit upon themselves and our arms, and are above praise.

For individual instances of good conduct I refer to the subordinate reports which are herewith transmitted.

To the members of my staff I am under great obligations for gallant and efficient service rendered me.

Bvt. Brigadier General Charles G. Loring, assistant inspector-general; Bvt. Colonel J. L. Van Buren; Bvt. Majs. J. B. Parke and D. A. Pell, and Captain R. H. I. Goddard, aides-de-camp; Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel P. M. Lydig and Captain John C. Youngman, assistant adjutants-general, and Captain James S. Casey, commissary of musters, were with me during the battle of April 2, and did gallant and distinguished service.

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*See p.1048.

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The other officers were active in the discharge of the duties of their respective departments.

A tabular statement of losses is annexed.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. G. PARKE,
Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General GEORGE D. RUGGLES,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac.

Tabular statement.

ADDENDA.
HDQRS. DISTRICT OF ALEXANDRIA, NINTH ARMY CORPS,
Alexandria, Va., May 29, 1865.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

COLONEL: I have the honor to recommend for promotion the officers here named:

Bvt. Major General R. B. Potter, commanding Second Division, as major-general U. S. Volunteers for gallantry at the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick on April 2, 1865, in which action he was very severely wounded.

Brigadier General S. G. Griffin, as brevet major-general for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick on April 2, 1865, in which action, after the wounding of Brevet Major-General Potter, he commanded the Second Division.

Bvt. Brigadier General Charles G. Loring, assistant inspector-general, and Bvt. Brigadier General J. C. Tidball, chief of artillery, as brevet major-generals for gallant and meritorious conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Bvt. Colonel J. L. Van Buren, aide-de-camp, as brevet brigadier-general for gallant and meritorious conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel L. H. Peirce, chief quartermaster, as brevet colonel for faithful and arduous services during the campaign before Petersburg.

Surg. E. B. Dalton, U. S. Volunteers, medical director, as brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct at the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel P. M. Lydig, assistant adjutant-general, as brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct at the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

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*But see revised table, p.590.

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Bvt. Major J. B. Parke, Seventeenth U. S. Infantry, aide-de-camp, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Bvt. Major R. H. I. Goddard, aide-de-camp, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain J. C. Youngman, assistant adjutant-general, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865, and long and valuable services in his department.

Captain James S. Casey, Fifth U. S. Infantry, commissary of musters, as brevet major for faithfully conduct of his department and gallant services in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain J. S. Tobey, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, and acting assistant quartermaster, as brevet major for eminent gallantry and good conduct throughout the war.

Captain F. A. Stitzer, Forty-eight Pennsylvania Volunteers, and chief of Ambulance Corps, as brevet major for gallant and faithful services during the campaign before Petersburg.

Asst. Surg. Samuel Adams, U. S. Army, medical inspector, as brevet captain for long, faithful and highly meritorious conduct throughout the war and for gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant L. A. Dillingham, signal officer, as brevet captain for meritorious services in the campaign before Petersburg.

Bvt. Brigadier General John I. Curtin, commanding First Brigade, Second Division, as brigadier-general U. S. Volunteers for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Colonel Samuel Harriman, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, brevet brigadier-general for meritorious services as commanding a brigade since September 30, 1864, and for gallant conduct in the assault on the enemy’s lines before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Surg. James Harris, Seventh Rhode Island Volunteers, medical director, Second Division, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for long and faithful services throughout the war.

Captain S. S. Sumner, Fifth U. S. Cavalry, aide-de-camp, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the campaign before Vicksburg and Jackson, Miss., in June and July, 1863.

FIRST DIVISION.

Bvt. Colonel Ralph Ely, commanding Second Brigade, as brevet brigadier-general for conspicuous gallantry in the assault of Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Colonel James Bintliff, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general for conspicuous gallantry in the assault of Petersburg, April 2, 1865.

Colonel Charles Waite, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general for conspicuous gallantry in the assault of Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Surg. M. K. Hogan, U. S. Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the campaign of Eastern Virginia in 1864 and 1865.

Surg. P. A. O’Connell, U. S. Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the campaign of South Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland, 1862: Tennessee, 1863; Virginia, 1864 and 1865.

Captain L. Curtis Brackett, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the attack on Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and same on Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Captain Daniel N. Howay, Seventeenth Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services in the actions of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, June 18, 1864; Weldon Railroad and Petersburg, April 2, 1865.

Captain C. D. Browne, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain H. L. Swords, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain Sylvester Keyser, Second Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain John B. Pizer, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain Christian Rath, Seventeenth Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain Benjamin D. Safford, Seventeenth Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain James Galt, assistant quartermaster, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain C. M. Robins, commissary of subsistence, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg in the winter and spring operations of 1865.

Captain George Goodsell, Seventeenth Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct before Petersburg int he winter and spring operations of 1865, and for conspicuous gallantry in action at the Pegram house September 30, 1864, where he was wounded.

Major R. N. Doyle, Eighth Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallantry on April 2, 1865, in the assault before Petersburg, and for promptness and efficiency as an officer on all occasions.

Captain W. A. Norton, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, acting assistant adjutant-general, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the assaults upon the enemy’s works on April 2, 1865, before Petersburg.

Captain C. H. McCreery, Eighth Michigan Veteran Volunteers, brigade inspector, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the assaults upon the enemy’s works on April 2, 1865, before Petersburg.

Captain E. Burnett, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, aide-de-camp, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the assaults upon the enemy’s works on April 2, 1865, before Petersburg.

First Lieutenant William P. Maxon, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, pioneer officer, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the assaults upon the enemy’s works on April 2, 1865, before Petersburg.

Captain Daniel G. Cash, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for coolness and bravery in the assaults before Petersburg on the 2nd of April, 1865.

Captain R. A. Hadwick, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for coolness and bravery in the assaults before Petersburg on the 2nd of April, 1865.

First Lieutenant William Kennedy, One hundred and ninth New York Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the attack before Petersburg, Va., of April 2, 1865.

Adjt. C. I. Miltimore, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry during the campaign before Petersburg.

Captain Charles L. Ballard, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, as brevet major for gallantry in the assault on Fort Mahone, in which he was severely wounded.

Second Lieutenant Charles S. Wood, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, as brevet first lieutenant for gallantry in the attack on Fort Mahone, April 2, 1865.

Captain John C. Boughton, Second Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the assault of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant John Hardy, Second Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the attack of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant Isaac Perrine, Second Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Major Samuel K. Schwenk, Fiftieth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for conspicuous gallantry before Petersburg, and in the attack on Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant Henry Thielemann, Forty-sixth New York Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel A. W. Nichols, First Michigan Sharpshooters, as brevet colonel for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865, where he was severely wounded.

Captain Ira L. Evans, First Michigan Sharpshooters, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious services during the last campaign and in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Captain J. S. De Land, First Michigan Sharpshooters, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious services during the last campaign and in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Captain Leverette N. Case, First Michigan Sharpshooters, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious services during the last campaign and in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Major Edwin J. Buckbee, First Michigan Sharpshooters, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for meritorious services April 2, 1865, before Petersburg.

First Lieutenant Edward R. Chase, adjutant Eighth Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant M. L. Willey, Eighth Michigan Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Captain Robert Eddy, Sixtieth Ohio Volunteers, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious conduct during the assault before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant William S. Matthews, Sixtieth Ohio Volunteers, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va.

Captain Albert A. Day, Twentieth Michigan Volunteers, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the attack on Fort Stedman.

Second Lieutenant S. C. Whiting, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, pioneer officer, as brevet first lieutenant for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg on the 2nd of April and during the whole campaign.

Lieutenant Colonel J. H. Pentecost, One hundred Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, as brevet colonel for gallantry March 25, 1865, in the attack on Fort Stedman, in which action he lost his life.

Major George M. Randall, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, as brevet colonel for constant gallantry and devotion to duty during the whole campaign, and particular gallantry in the attack of Fort Stedman on March 25, 1865.

Captain Charles H. Houghton, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, as brevet major for gallant conduct at Forts Stedman and Haskell march 25, 1865, Captain Houghton having received three wounds.

Captain Joseph P. Cleary, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, as brevet major for gallant conduct at Forts Stedman and Haskell March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant W. W. McCall, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, as brevet captain for gallant conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant Charles A. Lochbrunner, Fourteenth New York [Heavy] Artillery, as brevet captain for gallant conduct at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Second Lieutenant Charles A. O’Brien, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, as brevet first lieutenant for gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Major James Doherty, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallantry on March 25, 1865, at Fort Stedman, in which action he was mortally wounded.

Captain Joseph F. Carter, Third Maryland Battalion, as brevet major for gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, capturing the colors of the Fifty-first Virginia Infantry.

Captain W. S. Greenough, Eighteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, as brevet major for gallantry before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Captain John M. Deane, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services in the attack upon Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant David P. Sculley, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious services in the attack upon Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant James McQuillan, [Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers], regimental quartermaster, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious services in the attack upon Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant H. C. Joslyn, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious services in the attack upon Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Sergt. Benjamin R. Symonds (acting lieutenant), Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet second lieutenant for gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant H. A. Smith, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant B. F. Chesley, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant S. K. Goldsmith, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Captain Thomas William Clarke, acting assistant adjutant-general, Third Brigade, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services throughout the war

SECOND DIVISION.

Bvt. Major Samuel Wright, assistant adjutant-general, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for meritorious services, and especially for gallant conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Bvt. Major James B. Smith, Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for meritorious services, and especially for gallant conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Captain Horatio Potter, Seventh New York Heavy Artillery, as brevet major for meritorious services, and especially for gallant conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Captain Joseph Gottlieb, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet major for meritorious services, and especially for gallant conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Joseph A. Modica, Eleventh New Hampshire Volunteers, as brevet captain for meritorious services, and especially for gallant conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Edward Rose, Fifty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for meritorious services, and especially for gallant conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which he was wounded.

Captain Charles E. Mallam, assistant adjutant-general, as brevet major for valuable services and gallant conduct on April 2, 1865.

Captain T. Edward Ames, Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant William A. Ogden, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Second Lieutenant Adams A. McDonald, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet first lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Colonel Sumner Carruth, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general, U. S. Volunteers, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Colonel A. C. Wildrick, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general, U. S. Volunteers, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel John C. Whiton, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel I. F. Brannon, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet colonel for conspicuous and gallant conduct in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Captain R.c. Cheeseman, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant G. B. Costello, Seventh Rhode Island Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

Captain E. A. Jenks, Seventh Rhode Island Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Albion M. Dudley, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Heman Chase, jr., Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant George F. Worcester, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant William Auman, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Thomas H. Sillyman, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

Second Lieutenant Francis Allebach, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet first lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

Captain Peter F. Rogers, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Henry Reynolds, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865, in which he was wounded.

Captain L. N. Sawyer, Eleventh New Hampshire Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

Captain S. G. Goodwin, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct April 2, 1865.

Captain Benjamin F. Weeks, commissary of subsistence, as brevet major for uniform meritorious conduct and especial gallantry on April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Ira G. Wilkins, Eleventh New Hampshire Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

First Lieutenant Thomas Child, Thirty-first Maine Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel P. P. Bixby, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, as brevet colonel for gallant and highly meritorious conduct in command of his brigade April 2, 1865.

Major Samuel D. Quarles, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct on April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel B. F. Taylor, Second Maryland Veteran Volunteers, as brevet colonel for conspicuous gallantry in leading his men in two charges April 2, 1865.

Captain Omer P. Cram, Second Maryland Veteran Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

Major George A. Bolton, Thirty-first Maine Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

Captain E. S. Kyes, Thirty-first Maine Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Captain Z. B. Adams, Fifty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Captain Abijah Hollis, Fifty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Major Lyman E. Knapp, Seventeenth Vermont Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

Captain C. W. Corey, Seventeenth Vermont Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant A. C. Fay, Seventeenth Vermont Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant C. D. Brainerd, Seventeenth Vermont Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant H. O. Claflin, Seventeenth Vermont Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

Captain E. C. Bowen, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Captain Giles H. Holden, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

Captain Levi Force, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Second Lieutenant Hathaway Musgrave, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, as brevet first lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault of April 2, 1865, in which action he was wounded.

THIRD DIVISION.

Bvt. Major John D. Bertolette, assistant adjutant-general, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and distinguished services at Fort Stedman, Va., March 25, 1865; as brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious services on April 2, 1865, in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick.

Bvt. Major George Shorkley, captain Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, division inspector, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallantry and meritorious services at Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865, in which action he was seriously wounded; as colonel by brevet for his long, faithful, and valuable services in the inspector-general’s department April 9, 1865.

Captain Richard A. Watts, Seventeenth Michigan Volunteers, aide-de-camp, as brevet major for gallant and distinguished services at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865; as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services, April 2, 1865, in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick.

Captain William H. Hodkins, Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, assistant commissary of musters, as brevet major for valuable and distinguished services at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Captain Prosper Dalien, Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, acting engineer officer, as brevet major for his daring and bravery at Fort Stedman on the 25th of March, in which action he was seriously wounded.

Captain E. P. Brown, Fourth Rhode Island Volunteers, acting division inspector, as brevet major for gallant and distinguished services before Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain T. W. Hoffman, Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, acting engineer officer, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious service of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865; as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services on April 2, 1865, in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick.

Surg. A. F. Whelan, First Michigan Sharpshooters, surgeon-in-chief, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for his long, efficient, and valuable services in his department as surgeon-in-chief of the division since its organization.

Captain J. K. Cilley, assistant quartermaster, as brevet major for his efficient and valuable services in his department as division quartermaster since its organization.

Captain E. B. Moore, commissary of subsistence, as brevet major for his long, efficient, and valuable services in the subsistence department of the division since its organization.

Colonel C. W. Diven, Two hundred Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanding First Brigade, as brevet brigadier-general for valuable and meritorious services rendered by him March 25, 1865.

Colonel A. B. McCalmont, Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general for his long and faithful services during the war, both as colonel of the Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers and lieutenant-colonel commanding One hundred and forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. H. McCall, commanding Two hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet colonel for coolness, bravery, and skill displayed by him at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865; as brevet brigadier-general for valuable and meritorious services while commanding First Brigade in the assault in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Major Jacob Rehrer, Two hundred Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain F. A. Hoffman, Two hundred Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

First Lieutenant John McWilliams, Two hundred Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and distinguished services in the assault upon the enemy in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant B. F. Eberly, Two hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious services in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel M. T. Heintzelman, Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet colonel for his efficiency at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and for meritorious services in the attack upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Major Alexander Bobb, Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Second Lieutenant David F. Keagy, Two hundred and eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as captain by brevet for distinguished gallantry in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel George W. Frederick, Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious service at Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865, and for valuable services in the attack upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Major J. L. Ritchey, Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services in the assault at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865; as brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious services in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Colonel J. A. Mathews, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanding Second Brigade, as brevet brigadier-general for gallant, and meritorious services in the assault upon Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and for his meritorious services in the assault on Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant E. L. Reber, adjutant Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, acting assistant adjutant-general, Second Brigade, as brevet captain for gallant and meritorious services at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and for his meritorious services in the assault on Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Colonel R. C. Cox, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general for gallant and meritorious services in the repulse of the enemy at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and for distinguished gallantry in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick, April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant G. M. Bastian, adjutant Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallantry in the repulse of the enemy at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and for the coolness and bravery displayed by him in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain James A. Rogers, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for distinguished gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and for gallant and meritorious services in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant R. C. Ivory, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services in the engagement in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain S. D. Phillips, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain J. W. Rutt, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services in the engagement in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain R. T. Wood, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and meritorious services in the engagement in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain J. J. Rees, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for distinguished gallantry and meritorious services in the engagement in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Major B. M. Morrow, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services in the recapture of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault upon the enemy’s works in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain J. A. McCahan, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and distinguished services at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

Captain Richard Boone, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet major for gallant and distinguished services in the charge at Fort Stedman march 25, 1865, and in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Morris Davis, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet captain for gallant and distinguished services in the charge at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault of April 2, 1865.

Colonel William J. Bolton, Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, as brevet brigadier-general for his gallant and meritorious services during the war.

ARTILLERY BRIGADE.

Captain Edward J. Jones, Eleventh Massachusetts Battery, as brevet major for meritorious services during the siege of Petersburg and for conspicuous promptness and energy in assisting in repulsing the enemy from Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Captain A. B. Twitchell, commanding Seventh Maine Battery, as brevet major for meritorious services during the siege of Petersburg and for conspicuous promptness and energy in command of the artillery of Fort Sedgwick on April 2, 1865.

Captain Theodore Miller, Fourth New York Artillery, as brevet major for meritorious services during the siege of Petersburg and for gallantry at the attack upon Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

Captain David F. Ritchie, commanding Battery C, First New York Artillery, as brevet major for conspicuous gallantry and coolness on April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant William H. Rogers, First Connecticut Artillery, as brevet captain for conspicuous gallantry in the attack upon the enemy’s works in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant George E. Ketchum, Battery C, First New York Artillery, as brevet captain for distinguished services on April 2, 1865, in the attack on Petersburg.

Second Lieutenant David B. Cooper, Battery C, First New York Artillery, as first lieutenant by brevet for gallant and distinguished services in the assault of the enemy’s works at Petersburg April 2, 1865.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. G. PARKE,
Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 1, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant-General.

These recommendations are approved with the exception of that in case of Bvt. Brigadier General Charles G. Loring, whose services are believed to have been fully rewarded by the brevet commission which he now holds.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF ALEXANDRIA, NINTH ARMY CORPS,
Alexandria, Va., [May 29], 1865.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

COLONEL: In accordance with instructions from headquarters Army of the Potomac, I have the honor to submit the following list of enlisted men in the Ninth Corps who have pre-eminently distinguished themselves during the recent campaign, with recommendation that they be awarded medals of honor for their gallantry:

FIRST DIVISION.

1. Sergt. Eldbridge H. Benham, Company I, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry during the attack on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865. Wounded in the left shoulder while mounting the parapet of the fort, but refused to go to the rear, and remained on duty the whole day.

2. Sergt. Amos Hammon, Company D, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, was among the first to enter the fort, where his coolness and daring were conspicuous, assisting in turning and firing the first gun on the enemy.

3. Sergt. William E. Gibbons, Company K, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in the assault April 2, 1865. In the darkness he became separated from his company, when he gathered a few men around him and charged down the lines to the right of the fort, capturing some twenty prisoners.

4. Sergt. Abram A. Devore, Company C, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, was among the first to enter Fort Mahone, taking several prisoners.

5. Corpl. Robert A. Lawrence, Company F, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, was one of the first to pass the chevaux-de-frise and mount the enemy’s works April 2, 1865, loading and firing his gun several times after being severely wounded.

6. Corpl. Louis W. Hardwick, Company G, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, when he was severely wounded in a hand-to-hand conflict.

7. Private John A. Ford, Company H, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, was particularly conspicuous for gallantry in the assault before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, being among the foremost in removing the chevaux-de-frise in front of Fort Mahone. He fell severely wounded inside the fort.

8. Private Thomas Criswell, Company E, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, gallantly ran in advance of his company, and by an extraordinary effort succeeded in removing a portion of the chevaux-de-frise. He was among the first to mount the fort, where he was severely wounded, losing his right land.

9. Private John Kramer, Company B, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, was among the first to enter Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, and during the day exhibited great courage and fortitude.

10. Color-Sergt. R. Campbell, First Michigan Sharpshooters, for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, planting the colors of his regiment on the works.

11. Sergt. William Wick, Company D, First Michigan Sharpshooters, was the first to enter the enemy’s works in the attack of April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va., and engaged in a hand-to-hand conflict with the enemy.

12. Corpl. Sidney Haight, Company E, First Michigan Sharpshooters, for conspicuous gallantry in the attack of April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va.

13. Corpl. Charles M. Thatcher, Company E, First Michigan Sharpshooters, for conspicuous gallantry in the attack of April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va.

14. Private A. Scott, Company K, First Michigan Sharpshooters, for repeated gallantry in the field, particularly in the attack before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

15. Sergt. Major Charles H. Pinkham, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, for gallantry in the assault on Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865, capturing the colors of the Fifty-seventh North Carolina Infantry.

16. First Sergt. John O’Donnell, Company A, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, for gallantry during the action of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and heroic conduct during all engagements in which the regiments has participated.

17. First Sergt. George Adams, Company G, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, for gallantry during the action at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, receiving in this action the fifteenth wound and refusing to leave his company until after the battle was over.

18. First Sergt. Charles F. Sherman, Company B, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg April 2, 1865.

19. Sergt. Charles P. Battelle, Company A, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

20. Corpl. John Fred, Company B, Fifty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in the assault before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

21. Corpl. Edward Mitchell, Company D, Third Maryland Battalion Veteran Volunteers, for gallant conduct in the assault on Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, taking some twenty prisoners.

22. Corps. William H. Erdman, Company D, Third Maryland Battalion Veteran Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, being among the first to re-enter the fort and taking fifteen prisoners.

23. Private Patrick McCran, Company C, Third Maryland Battalion Veteran Volunteers, for recapturing the colors of the Twenty-seventh Georgia Infantry, and bravely assisted in releasing many of our men who had been taken prisoners.

24. Color-Sergt. Robert Kiley, Company L, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, for conspicuous gallantry during the engagement at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

25. Sergt. James Hyatt, Company H, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, for conspicuous gallantry during the engagement at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

26. Private James K. Brady, Company H, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, for capturing the colors of the Twenty-sixth South Carolina Infantry.

27. Private John Wilder Boutwell, Company B, Eighteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va., bringing off from the picket-line, under a heavy fire, a comrade who had been shot through both legs.

28. Private Carlton N. Camp, Company B, Eighteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va., bringing off from the picket-line, under a heavy fire, a comrade who had been wounded through both legs.

29. Sergt. Lawson S. Warner, Company B, Eighth Michigan Veteran Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry during the campaign before Petersburg, especially on April 2, 1865, being one of the first to wheel into position, load, and fire one of the captured guns at Fort Mahone.

30. First Sergt. E. L. Doolittle, Company G, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, displayed conspicuous gallantry on the 2nd of April in the attack and capture of Fort Mahone.

31. Sergt. Reuben D. Shaw, Company C, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, displayed conspicuous gallantry on the 2nd of April in the attack and capture of Fort Mahone.

32. Sergt. Charles E. Franck, Company I, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, displayed conspicuous gallantry on the 2nd of April in the attack and capture of Fort Mahone.

33. Private Payson Dunn, Company F, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, displayed conspicuous gallantry on the 2nd of April in the attack and capture of Fort Mahone.

34. Private Joseph Mach-me-non-o-nee, Company K, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, displayed conspicuous gallantry on the 2nd of April in the attack and capture of Fort Mahone.

35. Sergt. John McGregor, Company E, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry throughout the campaign, especially in the assault before Petersburg, Va.

36. Sergt. Henry A. Kichly, Company B, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry throughout the campaign, especially in the assault before Petersburg, Va.

37. Corpl. Silas Cramer, Company G, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry throughout the campaign, especially in the assault before Petersburg, Va.

38. Corpl. George Lane, Second Company Sharpshooters, Twenty-seventh Michigan Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry throughout the campaign, especially in the assault before Petersburg, Va.

39. Color-Sergt. Charles Oliver, Company M, One hundredth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, captured the colors of the Thirty-first Georgia Infantry in the assault on Fort Stedman, and planted his regimental colors on the fort while it was still occupied by the enemy.

40. Private Joseph B. Chambers, Company F, One hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, captured the colors of the First Virginia Infantry in the assault on Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

41. Corpl. M. D. Dewire, Company A, One hundredth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, in the assault on Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, captured a rebel flag-staff and part of the flag and recaptured the national camp-color staff.

SECOND DIVISION.

42. Private James Lawley, Company B, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who deserved from the enemy on the evening of January 1, 1865. On the morning of April 2, in the charge on Fort Mahone, when asked by Colonel Gowan, previous to the fall of that brave officer, what brought him there, he replied that he did no wish to be considered a coward. Although slightly wounded, and regardless of the fate that awaited him (should he fall into the enemy’s hands), he remained on the field, and was one of the first to enter the captured fort.

43. Corpl. James Horan, Company C, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who urged his comrades forward and to the cannon’s

mouth and entered the rebel fort. He has belonged to this regiment ever since its organization, has always been a good and faithful soldier, and has several scars on his person from wounds received in action during this rebellion.

44. Color-Sergt. John Taylor, Company A, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who carried the colors of his regiment through Fort Mahone to the enemy’s second line. The color staff was twice shot off while in his hands.

45. Private James Mullen, Company I, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who, being among the first to enter Fort Mahone, turned the enemy’s gun upon them, exerted himself in every way to use it to good advantage upon the flying foe.

46. Color-Sergt. Andrew J. Goodfellow, Company A, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who by his personal valor distinguished himself in the assault on Fort Mahone.

47. Corpl. Henry Irvin, Company E, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who by his personal valor distinguished himself int he assault on Fort Mahone.

48. Private Penrose Miller, Company E, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who by his personal valor distinguished himself in the assault on Fort Mahone.

49. Color-Corpl. John Kinsey, Company B, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who by his personal valor distinguished himself in the assault on Fort Mahone.

50. Color-Corpl. David W. Rees, Company G, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who by his personal valor distinguished himself in the assault on Fort Mahone.

51. Private Edward Mills, Company I, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, who by his personal valor distinguished himself in the assault on Fort Mahone.

52. Private Frank Gravlin, Company K, Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, who distinguished himself in endeavoring to rally the troops on the right of the line on the afternoon of April 2, 1865, in the performance of which he was severely wounded.

53. Sergt. Peter M. W. Baldwin, Company E, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, who in charge on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, displayed great gallantry and performed his duty nobly.

54. Sergt. Edward Starr, Company K, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, who in charge on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, displayed great gallantry and performed his duty nobly.

55. Private John Anderson, Company H, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, who in charge on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, displayed great gallantry and performed his duty nobly.

56. Private Aaron D. Hathaway, Company G, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, who in charge on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, displayed great gallantry and performed his duty nobly.

57. Private John A. White, Company H, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, who in charge on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, displayed great gallantry and performed his duty nobly.

58. Private Edward Doten, Company I, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, who in charge on Fort Mahone April 2, 1865, displayed great gallantry and performed his duty nobly.

59. Private Michael Noonan, Company E, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, who while carrying fixed ammunition from Fort Sedgwick on the morning of April 2, 1865, was wounded, yet refused to

drop his load; having delivered it to the gunner in the captured lines, he returned to his company, and only left to have his wounds dressed when ordered by the commanding officer.

60. Private Victor Mahlstedt, Company E, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers, who while carrying fixed ammunition from Fort Sedgwick on the morning of April 2 was wounded, yet refused to drop his load; having delivered it to the gunners in the captured lines, he returned to his company, and only left to have his wounds dressed when ordered by the commanding officer.

61. Sergt. Charles H. Stevens, Company D, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, who was wounded while assisting in firing one of the captured guns in Fort Mahone.

62. Private Henry A. Russell, Company E, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, who was wounded while attending to the wounded of his regiment.

63. Color-Sergt. James Jarvis, Company I, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers, who when asked by an officer attempting to rally the men to give him to colors replied that he stood by those colors, and was afterward wounded.

64. Color-Sergt. Henry E. Badger, Company E, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, for coolness and gallantry in first entering a rebel fort and planting the Stars and Stripes on one of its guns on the 2nd of April 1865, before Petersburg, Va., also for soldierly conduct throughout his service.

65. Sergt. James O. Smith, Company A, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, for gallantry during the charge on the rebel fortified line and forts before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, also for bravery as color-bearer of regiment.

66. Color-Corpl. George W. Otterson, Company G, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, for gallant conduct during the charge on the enemy’s works before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1864, where he was wounded.

67. Sergt. Julius Voigt, Company K, Sixth New Hampshire Veteran Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry during the charge on the enemy’s lines before Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, where he was wounded.

68. First Sergt. George F. Goldthwait, Company C, Thirty-first Maine Volunteers, for bravery and gallant conduct in the engagement of April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va. Sergeant Goldthwait was the first to enter one of the rebel forts and was wounded while assisting in turning one of the enemy’s guns upon them.

69. Sergt. Warren Boothby, Company I, Thirty-first Maine Volunteers, for brave and gallant conduct in the engagement of April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Va. During the action he seized the colors and, amid a shower of shot and shell, planted them upon the rebel works and stood by them until the action was ended. Whenever the men wavered he would grasp the colors, wave them in the face of the enemy, and call on the men to stand by him. By his brave example and words of encouragement he contributed all possible for one in his position to do toward the success of the day.

70. Corpl. Leonard Trafton, Company A, Thirty-first Maine Volunteers, first and foremost in every battle in which he was engaged, and particularly in the engagement of April 2, 1865.

71. First Sergt. Oscar S. Jennings, Company I, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the

line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line, and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

72. First Sergt. Edwin Lamberson, Company A, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on the enemy’s line, and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

73. Sergt. George W. Mills, Company A, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

74. Sergt. A. T. Courtright, Company A, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

75. Sergt. Francis E. Thorne, Company A, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

76. Corpl. S. H. McIntosh, Company D, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

77. Corpl. Asa C. Ottarson, Company A, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

78. Private Daniel J. Hunt, Company I, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibing those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

79. Private William S. Root, Company I, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

80. Private William T. Harris, Company A, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

81. Private G. P. Taylor, Company E, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

82. Private Robert R. Ferris, Company G, One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers, for his steady and unflinching bravery during the assault on the enemy’s position April 2, 1865. As the line advanced to the abatis, pressed on to the enemy’s line and entered the works and remained there during the day, exhibiting those qualities which entitle the soldier to the highest commendation.

THIRD DIVISION.

83. Private James Decker, Company D, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. On the morning of March 25, 1865, in the affair of Stedman, Private Decker captured a flag from the enemy, but during the confusion an officer wearing the badge of the First Division, Ninth Army Corps, whose name and rank could not be ascertained, snatched the flag away from him and ran to the rear with it. This statement is certified to by the commanding officers of Companies D, C, B, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

84. Private Charles H. Keinert, Company F, Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. This soldier captured a stand of rebel colors from the enemy March 25, 1865, but threw it away, saying that he would rather shoot a rebel than carry that thing. This is certified to by the commanding officer of the Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

85. Private John A. Sipe, Company I, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, captured a flag from the enemy in the charge on Fort Stedman, killing the rebel color-bearer upon his refusing to surrender. The flag, however, was taken from Private Sipe by a field officer belonging to the corps, whose name and rank could not be ascertained. This is certified to by several members of the soldier’s company.

86. Corpl. Frederick D. Feight, Company H, Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, orderly at headquarters Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, for conspicuous bravery displayed in carrying dispatches under fire during the affair of Stedman March 25, 1865.

87. Private Levi A. Smith, Company E, Two hundred Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous bravery in the affair of Stedman. After the color-sergeant had been shot down this soldier volunteered to carry the colors, which he did gallantly through the action.

88. Sergt. Elbridge Stiles, Company C, Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, color-bearer, for conspicuous bravery and gallant conduct during the affair of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

89. Sergt. Edward J. Humphreys, Company C, Two hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, color-bearer, for conspicuous bravery and gallant conduct during the affair of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

90. Private George Dull, Company F, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for gallantry in the charge at the retaking of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865.

91. Sergeant Shoutz, Company D, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for his bravery at Fort Stedman March 25, and in front of Petersburg April 2, 1865, where he commanded his company and led his men bravely on in the assault.

92. Sergt. J. H. Stephens, Company C, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for his bravery in the charges at Fort Stedman March 25 and April 2, 1865, in front of Petersburg.

93. Sergt. Henry Naber, Company C, Two hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, color-bearer, for bravery and gallantry, carrying the regimental colors in the charge at the retaking of Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault on the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865, when he was wounded.

94. Sergt. Daniel A. Seward, Company C, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in the repulse of the enemy at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and in the assault upon the enemy in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

95. Sergt. Charles H. Ilgenfritz, Company E, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in the assault upon the enemy’s lines in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865.

96. Private Wilbur Brown, Company H, Two hundred and seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in Fort Stedman March 25, and in the assault in front of Fort Sedgwick April 2, 1865; was severely wounded at the latter place.

97. Corpl. John M. Engle, Company I, Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry on the picket-line in front of Petersburg March 29, 1865.

98. Private Thomas Troy, Company I, Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, for distinguished gallantry during the night of April 2, 1865, in ascertaining the movements of the enemy, bringing the first reliable information of the evacuation of Petersburg, Va.

99. Sergt. Major J. S. McQuaid, Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, for great bravery displayed in front of Petersburg April 2, 1865. This soldier, with the assistance of some of the men, turned and ran into position the captured guns and used them against the retreating rebels, under heavy fire.

100. First Sergt. James F. Johnston, Company D, Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, for gallantry in front of Petersburg April 2, 1865. After the commissioned officers of the company were killed or wounded, this soldier took command of his company and rallied the men, directing their fire, until he fell severely wounded.

101. Sergt. William R. Moore, Company D, Two hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, color-bearer, for gallantry before Petersburg April 2. This soldier was in the advance in the assault upon the works, carried the colors through the entire engagement, and was the second man to unfurl the Federal flag over the city of Petersburg.

ARTILLERY BRIGADE.

102. Sergt. David Cole, Battery C, First New York Artillery, for bravery and coolness in action, working the guns captured from the enemy and otherwise distinguished himself for gallantry throughout the campaign.

103. Sergt. Gustavus A. Rice, Battery C, First New York Artillery, for bravery and coolness in action, working the guns captured from the enemy and otherwise distinguishing himself for gallantry throughout the campaign.

104. Corpl. Samuel T. Mallet, Battery C, First New York Artillery, for bravery and coolness in action, working the guns captured from the enemy and otherwise distinguishing himself throughout the campaign.

105. Private Hiram Webster, Battery C, First New York Artillery, for bravery and coolness in action, working the guns captured from the enemy and otherwise distinguishing himself for gallantry throughout the campaign.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. G. PARKE,
Major-General, Commanding.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 1015-1039

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