Number 149. Appomattox Reports of Bvt. Captain Orsamus R. Van Etten, First Battery New York Light Artillery

   

0 comments

in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 149. Reports of Bvt. Captain Orsamus R. Van Etten, First Battery New York Light Artillery.1

FIRST NEW YORK INDEPENDENT BATTERY,
Camp in the Field, Va., April 4, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to report that the First New York Independent Battery opened fire upon the enemy from Fort Welch about 11 p.m. April 1. We kept up a continuous fire for about one hour, and then for two hours occasionally, using about 200 rounds of ammunition. After the charge was made and the works were carried, April 2, I moved out in front of the fort, left the pieces standing, using the horses for bringing off captured pieces and caissons. About 9.30 a.m. the Twenty-fourth Corps passed us, and soon after Major-General Gibbon sent a request saying it would oblige him very much if I would lend them a section. I sent Lieutenant Sears in charge of a section. He went into position under fire from a rebel fort at 10 a.m. After firing about seventy rounds they ceased to fire from the fort. About the same time, 11 a.m., General Wright wished the battery. I then took the whole battery toward Petersburg, on the Boydton plank road, to near the Whitworth house; there I opened fire upon infantry, under some fire from sharpshooters, about 12 m. After firing a few rounds I discovered some guns in a fort some 1,200 yards to my right; turned one section on the fort. On this fort and the infantry in front I continued firing until dark, having had 2 men and 2 horses wounded, and expended 611 rounds of ammunition.

I am, sir, your very obedient servant,

O. R. VAN ETTEN,
Lieutenant and Bvt. Captain, Commanding First N. Y. Independent Battery.

Lieutenant FREEBORN,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Artillery Brigade, Sixth Corps.

CAMP IN THE FIELD, VA.,
April 14, 1865.

SIR: I transmit to you the part taken by the First New York Independent Battery since the evacuation of Petersburg.

April 3, we moved out on the river road with the corps; marched until 5 p.m; parked for the night. April 4, we continued our march

after the enemy until 9 p.m.; halted for the night. April 5, still continued the march until about 9 p.m. April 6, we had a hard march, and about 4 p.m. we went into position about 800 yards from the enemy, and commenced shelling them rapidly; it did not last long, as the enemy gave way, and we were soon on the move again; we expended 145 rounds of ammunition; we parked for the night soon after passing over the battle-field. April 7, at 9 a.m. we again took up the march after the retreating foe; passed through Farmville and parked for the night. April 8 found us still on the march. April 9, marched till about 12 a.m. [noon], parked, and while at this point heard the enemy had surrendered; about 5 p.m. I fired a salute of thirty-six guns, then went into park for the night. Did not move April 10. April 11 found us on the march back to Burkeville; reached here April 13, having had a hard march, with the loss of three horses.

I am, sir, your very obedient servant,

O. R. VAN ETTEN,
Lieutenant and Bvt. Captain, Commanding First N. Y. Independent Battery.

Lieutenant FREEBORN,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Artillery Brigade, Sixth Corps.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 1012-1013

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: