Number 145. Appomattox Reports of Major William G. Williams, One hundred and twenty-sixth Ohio Infantry, commanding Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry

   

0 comments

in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 145. Reports of Major William G. Williams, One hundred and twenty-sixth Ohio Infantry, commanding Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry.1

HDQRS. SIXTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.,
April 10, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the action taken by the Sixty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers at the assault on the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865:

The regiment was marched from its camp by the left flank, following the One hundred and thirty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was formed near the picket-line of the Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, in the rear or third line of battle, ten paces from the next preceding it. At 5 a.m. the command forward was given. It moved forward in gallant style until we came to the enemy’s intrenched picket-line, where considerable difficulty was experienced in crossing it, on account of men in front lying down in the works, but by the gallant conduct of the officers, the regiment was moved forward to the assault, and I am proud to say its colors were among the first planted on the enemy’s works.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. G. WILLIAMS,
Major 126th Ohio Vols., Commanding Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania Vols.

Captain W. L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, 2nd Brigadier, 3rd Div., 6th Army Corps.

HDQRS. SIXTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.,
April 16, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following report, in compliance with circular dated headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, April 15, 1865, of the engagement of the 6th instant:

This regiment formed the right of the first line of battle, connecting on the left with the One hundred and thirty-eight Pennsylvania Volunteers. Moving forward for a distance of about 800 yards, the skirmish

line driving the enemy, we halted at a road, the name of which I do not know. After laying there for a few moments we moved off by the left flank for about 200 yards, and there formed line across the road, we at this time forming the second line of battle, the first being formed by the Sixth Maryland Volunteers and Ohio hundred and thirty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. We then moved down the road some distance, when my regiment (the second line) was ordered to halt and lie down; the first line continuing to advance, became engaged with the enemy. We were then ordered to advance, which we did, and guiding right soon had the regiment on the right of the road. The regiment moved gallantly forward, subject to a severe fire of musketry from the enemy, then sheltered behind some houses near the to the left of the road and a line of light works. The regiment charged forward, driving the enemy from them and capturing some prisoners. We then halted, and in a few moments reformed our lines. The First Division, Sixth Army Corps, then came up in a line of battle. We were ordered to lie down and allow them to pass over us. We then advanced in the rear of the First Division, crossing the swamp, which at this place was about twenty-five yards wide the very deep. The First Division moving by the right for some distance, we moved forward and connected with them on their left. We then advanced through the woods in line of battle, when the First Division, on our right, gave way and fell back to the swamp, which exposed our right flank, causing us to fall back about fifty yards. We again rallied, driving the enemy and capturing their line of works, together with a great many prisoners. Here we halted and reformed our line, resting for about an hour, when we moved out right in front for two or three miles, and encamped for the night.

Our loss was 2 killed and 21 wounded.

I would further add that Corpl. John Keough, of Company E, Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, captured the colors of the Fiftieth Georgia.

The regiment behaved nobly during the engagement. Sergeants Horace P. Warfield, Company C, John Larimer, Company H, William A. Rager, Company E, William R. Black, Company G, and William Keller, Company E, made themselves conspicuous at all times by assisting in rallying the men.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. G. WILLIAMS,
Major 126th Ohio Vols., Commanding Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania Vols.

Captain W. L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, 2nd Brig., 3rd Div., 6th Army Corps.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 1006-1007

***


Check out TOCWOC – A Civil War Blog for more great Civil War content!

What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

Want to read some interesting Civil War content from amateurs and pros alike? Check out the Top 10 Civil War Blogs and Top 10 Civil War Blogs: 11-20.

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: