Number 142. Appomattox Reports of Bvt. Colonel Otho H. Binkley, One hundred and tenth Ohio Infantry

   

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in Appomattox Campaign Reports (95)

No. 142. Reports of Bvt. Colonel Otho H. Binkley, One hundred and tenth Ohio Infantry.1

HEADQUARTERS 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
April 10, 1865.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and tenth Ohio Volunteers in the assault of Sunday, April 2, 1865, upon the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg, Va.

The One hundred and tenth Regiment formed the right of the front line, connecting on its left with the Sixth Maryland Regiment. The regiment was commanded by Captain William D. Shellenberger, I being in charge of the picket-line as corps officer of the day. When the signal for the advance was fired from Fort Fisher the regiment moved forward with the balance of the line, and was one of the first to plant its colors upon the enemy’s works. Before reaching the enemy’s works Captain Shellenberger was severely wounded in the left arm and was compelled to retire from the field. Captain Elem Harter was also severely wounded in the arm. Captain H. H. Stevens was shot dead after he had gotten inside of the enemy’s works and was in the act of charging a battery. Four pieces of artillery were captured by members of the regiment, 400 prisoners, and two flags. The flags were captured by Private Isaac James, Company H, and Sergt. Francis M. McMillen, Company C; the latter also captured one piece of artillery.

Captain George P. Boyer made himself conspicuous by his activity and bravery. Adjt. William H. Harry, Lieuts. John T. Sherer, A. A. Hubbard, D. S. French, and Amos Shaul deserve great credit for the manner in which they conducted themselves during the engagement. First Sergt. John W. Hays, commanding Company A, and Sergt. Richard Pearson, commanding Company G, are entitled to mention for their good conduct during the assault, in which the latter was severely wounded. Sergt. Thomas Goe, Company D, in charge of three men, caused 130 rebels to surrender to him; among those were 3 captains and 4 lieutenants. Corpl. Keeran McKenny, Company C, was the first to reach and capture a four-gun battery. Corpl. Calvin M.

Espy, in a hand-to-hand combat, overpowered two rebels who refused to surrender to him. A great many others performed deeds of a similar character, but to mention all would occupy too much space.

The regiment in the assault had 1 commissioned officer killed and 2 wounded, 3 enlisted men killed and 22 wounded; total, 28.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Brevet Colonel 110th Ohio Volunteers, Commanding Regiment.

Captain W. L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, 2nd Brigadier, 3rd Div., 6th Army Corps.

HEADQUARTERS 110TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,
April 15, 1865.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the One hundred and tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry from April 3, 1865:

After the assault upon the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, in which the One hundred and tenth Regiment took a prominent part, and of which I made mention in a former report, the regiment joined in the pursuit of the enemy, but did not become engaged with him until the 6th, when, near Little Sailor’s Creek, we met the enemy in force. Lines were immediately formed, the One hundred and tenth Regiment constituting the right of the first line, Companies A and F being deployed as skirmishers to the right. We advanced through a narrow strip of woods, where we were met by a severe fire of shell and grape, with musketry, which caused a temporary halt; but we again advanced, still exposed to the fire of grape and canister, driving the enemy before us across a large, open field, compelling the enemy’s artillery to leave its position, and capturing a number of wagons, with some ammunition. Had the men been fresh, instead of being fatigued from the day’s march, I have no doubt we could have taken the enemy’s battery.

In this charge the regiment was more fortunate than usual, having only one man wounded.

The regiment was, with its brigade, in pursuit of the rebel army at the time it was surrendered by the rebel general, Robert E. Lee.

The regiment then marched, with balance of the troops, to its present position.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. BINKLEY,
Brevet Colonel 110th Ohio Volunteers, Commanding Regiment.

Captain W. L. SHAW,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, 2nd Brig., 3rd Div., 6th Army Corps.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 1003-1004

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