Number 106. Appomattox Reports of Bvt. Major General Frank Wheaton, U. S. Army, commanding First Division

   

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No. 106. Reports of Bvt. Major General Frank Wheaton, U. S. Army, commanding First Division.1

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
April 15, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of this division in the engagement before Petersburg on the 2nd instant:

At midnight of the 1st, by direction of the major-general commanding the corps, I moved my command from camp near the Weldon railroad

to the left of the corps line, and massed it outside of Fort Welch, on the right of the Second Division. The brigades were formed in echelon, the left forward, in the following order: Third Brigade, Colonel O. Edwards, in three lines, thirty paces in rear of the right of the Second Division; First Brigade, Bvt. Brigadier General William H. Penrose, in three lines, thirty paces in rear of the right of the right of the Third Brigade; and the Second Brigade, Bvt. Brigadier General Joseph E. Hamblin, in two lines, thirty paces in rear of the right of the First Brigade. At 4.30 o’clock, upon a signal gun from Fort Fisher, the division moved forward with its “guide left,” each brigade taking up the movement toward the enemy’s lines as soon as the troops on its let had gained their prescribed distance of 100 paces between brigade lines. We were received by a sharp musketry and artillery fire, from which our losses were comparatively small, considering the distance we had to pass over under fire and the line of abatis that had to be cut away. During the advance in the dark each command became more or less disordered, the lines naturally merging in each other, on account of the enemy’s opposition and the natural physical obstacles-abatis, frise-work, &c.-encountered. An extra number of axes had been issued to the pioneers of each brigade, and directions given for these men to be deployed along the division front; and although from frequent previous inspections it was known that the works we were ordered to storm were well protected by lines of abatis, all were astonished to find these obstructions such serious obstacles and so difficult to remove; openings were made in them, however, under a severe canister and musketry fire, and all along our front officers and men pushed through and captured the enemy’s strong works in the most dashing and gallant manner. The Fifth Wisconsin and Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers formed the front line of the Third Brigade, which was the advanced echelon, and nearest the rebel works. Portions of these regiments had passed through the enemy’s entrenchments and camps, crossed the Boydton plank road, and fired into a train of cars moving on the South Side Railroad before day had fairly dawned. From its position the opposition encountered by the Third Brigade was much greater and its losses in the assault very much larger than in either or both the First and Second Brigades. They gallantly worked their way through the darkeners and obstructions into the enemy’s works, capturing guns and prisoners, and the Second Brigade being on the extreme right deployed regiments and companies along the line of works toward Petersburg, occupying battery after of the enemy’s lines for more than a mile to the right of the point assaulted. A detachment of the One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, after entering the works, ran forward to the Boydton plank road and cut the telegraph wire leading to Petersburg. The Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery and Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers formed the first line of the Second Brigade, and the Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers formed the first line of the First Brigade.

The troops were perfectly wild with delight at their success in this grand assault, and with difficulty could be restrained and the brigades reformed after the works, guns, prisoners, and camps were indisputably ours. In the original program for the assault it was determined that this division should, after the capture of the enemy’s line of works, operate to the right in the direction of Petersburg. The three brigades composing it had hardly been reformed, with a view to a movement in the direction of that city, still held by the enemy, who was distinctly heard resisting the Ninth Corps attack, when orders were received from General Wright to send the two nearest brigades

to the left to assist the Third and Second Division of this corps in their movement toward Hatcher’s Run, and with the remaining troops of the division to hold what we had gained and to wait further developments, it having been reported that the enemy were advancing in strong force to recapture their works.

In compliance with that order, I sent the First and Third Brigades, and withdraw the Second Brigade from the right to the position first occupied. Strong skirmish lines were advanced by the latter brigade toward Petersburg and the Appomattox River, and the enemy’s reconnoitering parties checked; but a force of some 600 of them came down the line of works, driving a detachment of some eighty men from the Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and division sharpshooters out of a fort they had captured some three-quarters of a mile to our right. They soon opened an enfilanding fire upon us with two rifled guns from this work, and at the same time the tower signal officer reported a column of some 600 of the enemy as having passed through the woods between us and the Appomattox, apparently to attack the left of the Second Brigades it faced toward Petersburg. More than three-quarters of this brigade was already deployed in the line of works and skirmishing, and there were but few troops in reserve for any emergency. In a very short time, however, a column of our troops arrived from near Fort Fisher, and the Second Brigade was relieved by a division of the Twenty-fourth Corps.

Almost immediately after, about 9.45 a. m., the First and Third Brigades returned from the left with the Second and Third Divisions, having met with but little resistance and encountered the advance of the Second and Fifth Corps from Hatcher’s Run. Soon after these brigades returned, by direction of the corps commander, I sent the Second Brigade to report to General Parke, commanding the Ninth Corps, and with the other two brigades moved to the right on the enemy’s line of works, forming on the left of the Second Division, joining it in the advance toward Petersburg, the Twenty-fourth Corps being on this right. In this order, with the Third Brigade in line and the First Brigade in echelon and refused on its left, we advanced for nearly three miles, exposed to a constant front and flank artillery and occasional musketry fire, until arrived within two miles of the city, at 1 p. m., and touching the South Side Railroad, we halted to await the arrival of other troops to complete a more thorough connection to the Appomattox. This, for reasons best known to the major-general commanding the corps, was not perfected, and at 5 p. m. orders were received to form my command in two lines on the left of a division of the Second Corps, which had arrived, and to intrench my front, which was accomplished at 10 p. m.

The work accomplished by the division on this day was the most difficult I had ever seen troops called upon to perform. Massing and advancing in the dark they successfully assaulted strongly entrenched and elaborately obstructed lines with a determination and gallantry that could never be excelled.

I cannot repress my admiration of the conduct of both officers and men and my deep-felt obligations to the brigade commanders for their distinguished services an able handling of their troops. Brevet Brigadier-General Penrose, Brevet Brigadier-General Hamblin, and Colonel Edwards more than earned for themselves this day the promptest recognition of their past long and gallant services.

During our advance toward Petersburg Captain Crawford Allen’s battery (H) of the First Rhode Island Artillery was admirably handled,

and his losses were severe; his guns were always in front, frequently in advance of the skirmishers, and as our lines moved froward he invariably forced the enemy’s batteries to retire, and followed them closely. Earlier in the day, when the assault commenced, Captain Allen very handsomely compelled a section of the enemy’s artillery to retire. If these guns, occupying one of their entrenched works and thoroughly enfilanding our lines, had not been silenced they might have materially retarded our advance.

In the assault and during the subsequent operantis of the day the officers of my staff rendered the same efficient and gallant service that has marked them on so many previous battle-fields. Their names are separately presented on the list of officers recommended for promotion.

A nominal list of casualties in this engagement accompanies this report, also a list of officers recommended for promotion for meritorious services and enlisted men entitled to special mention and reward.

The reports of brigade commanders include the operations of the 2nd and 6th instant. They will be submitted with my report of the operations of this division from the 3rd to the 13th instant, including the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK WHEATON,
Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

Major C. H. WHITTELSEY,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Sixth Corps.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
April-, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following list of casualties of commissioned officers and enlisted men in my command in the action of the 2nd instant.*

RECAPITULATION.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK WHEATON,
Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

Major C. H. WHITTELSEY,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Sixth Corps.

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*Nominal list omitted.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
April 20, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of my command from the 3rd to the 13th instant, inclusive.

During the night of April 2 directions from the corps commander were received to hold my division in readiness to attack the enemy’s works in our front at daylight, when the artillery of the corps was ordered to open fire. Soon after daylight Captain M. L. Butterfield, acting engineer officer of the division, while inspecting the picket-line, was met by the mayor of Petersburg, under inspecting the picket-line, was met by the mayor of Petersburg, under flag of truce, and haled by him a letter had been sent by the mayor to our forces on other roads, and by the time this one had reached Sixth Corps headquarters it was known that the enemy had retreated from the Ninth Corps front and that our troops were already in Petersburg. The Second Brigade of this division had, on the 2nd, been sent to support a portion of the Ninth Corps front, and Brevet Brigadier-General Hamblin was the first commander who entered Petersburg with his brigade.

At 9 a. m. on the 3rd this division moved with the corps in pursuit of the retreating enemy, being the second division in order of march, taking the River road from Petersburg toward Burkeville, marching ten miles, and bivouacked near the old Baptist Church, three miles west from Sutherland’s Station, on the South Side Railroad.

April 4, moved at 5 a. m., this division being the leading on being the order of march of the corps, halting at 8 a. m. to allow the Fifth Corps train to pass, which occupied until 2 p. m. At that hour resumed the march along the River road, crossing Namozine Creek, and going into bivouac at dark near the Cousins house, within a mile of Winticomack Creek.

April 5, marched at 6 a. m., this division being the third in the order of march of the corps for issue of rations at the James house, near Deep Creek, at 10 a. m. By orders from the corps commander I directed the First Brigade, Brevet Brigadier-General Penrose, to remain as guard, in conjunction with a Second Corps brigade, to the trains of the Second and Fifth Corps, which wee ordered to follow this corps. The balance of my command resumed the march at 2 p. m., halting at 10 p. m. near the Smithy house, a mile from Jetersville Station, on the Richmond and Danville Railroad. At this place we joined the Fifth Corps and Sheridan’s cavalry, to whom we had been hurried up, it having been reported to us that the enemy were in force in his front and threatening an attack. Bivouacked for the night, with orders to prepare to attack at daylight.

April 6, received orders to move at 6 a. m. in support of the Second and Third Divisions, and in the rear of the Second on the right, in an advance toward Amelia Court-House, where the enemy were supposed to be in force, prepared for an attack. I accordance with that order, with the Third Brigade on the right and the Second on the left, in two lines each, I advanced by the left of regiment to the front, guiding by the right regiment of the Second Division. Captain Crawford Allen’s battery (H, First Rhode Island Light Artillery) followed 100 paces in rear. In this manner we advanced two miles, through dense woods and over creeks and ravines, when orders were received from General Wright to return to the vicinity of Jetersville, the enemy having

abandoned his entrenched position near Amelia Court-House. At 10 a. m., when near the Smithy house, I was ordered to follow the Third Division, which was moving, via Jetersville, northwest toward Deatonsville. During the last two miles of our march heavy skirmishing by our cavalry and some artillery firing was heard. Halting the trains to facilitate the movement of the troops across the bridges of Flat Creek, we hurried forward in anticipation of an engagement, though the reports made me by cavalrymen from the front who met us on the road was that no infantry force had yet been encountered, and that the enemy’s cavalry were retreating. I never saw troops press on more eagerly or show greater desire to meet the enemy. After an hour’s hard marching we reached a turn in the road and high ground, from which we could see the road running from Deatonsville to Jenings’ Ordinary, upon which our cavalry had attacked the enemy’s wagon guard and train. By the time the head of my column had reached the vicinity of Little Sailor’s Creek we found the Third Division deployed, with its left upon the road referred to, some troops of the Second Corps on its right. Although the division had been pushing forward with the greatest haste, much of the march over plowed fields and rough ground, and the troops greatly fatigued, they doubled-quacked into position with the greatest spirit upon finding themselves in the immediate presence of the enemy. Our lines were soon formed-the right of the Third Brigade, Colonel Oliver Edwards, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, commanding, on the left of the Deatonsville road, and at right angles to it; the Second Brigade, Bvt. Brigadier General Joseph E. Hamblin, whose troops, being in rear, had a still harder race to get into position, entrenched position could be plainly seen in our front, less than one-third of a mile distant, on the crest in the woods opposite Little Sailor’s Creek, which lay at the foot of a long slope of plowed ground between us and their line. As our cavalry was known to be operating in their rear, I was urged by General Wright to hasten the attack, and, without waiting for the Second Brigade to be fully formed, the advance was ordered. Our artillery-Captain Crawford Allen’s battery, of this division, and others-shelled the enemy’s line with great effect as we moved forward; fortunately for us, they had no guns in position. Our movement toward the creek was in plain view and down a perfectly cleared field for more than one-quarter of a mile. Reaching the creek, instead of finding it like most of the steams we had passed that day, it was discovered to be a swamp, varying in width from 40 to 100 yards, and traversed by several streams, the water in many places above the shoulders of the troops. Both brigades were in one line, in order to cover the front. I was ordered to attack, and none but good troops, knowing that there was no second line behind them, would so gallantly have dashed into and crossed this difficult swamp and stream, while from the moment they reached its edge they were under the enemy’s severe musketry fire. The line after crossing the creek was readjusted under the crest occupied by the enemy, but the slopes in front of the right and center of the Third Brigade were too gradual to afford them protection and they were exposed to a severe front and enfilading fire. The Second Brigade was ordered to charge at once up the sleep hills and into the enemy’s line in the woods. This movement was brilliantly executed under a galling fire, and the Third Brigade at the same time advancing against the strong lines in its front, and the battle of Sailor’s Creek was won. A brigade of Southern marines stubbornly continued the fight, but the movements of the One hundred and twenty-first New York and Thirty-

seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, which were admirably handled, compelled them to speedily recognize our victory. On the extreme right the Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers rapidly pressed fairly through the enemy’s lines and skirmished directly in their rear, capturing Lieutenant-General Ewell, of the rebel army, his staff, and many other prisoners. The cavalry attacked the enemy in rear soon after our front attack had succeeded, and, of course, took most of the prisoners and material. This division pushed rapidly on in pursuit, the Third Brigade to the right and the Second to the front and left. The number of prisoners taken is not known. I understand that the result of our attack was the capture of nearly all the rebel troops in our front, which consisted of Ewell’s two divisions and the Confederate Marine Brigade. This division took Lieutenant-General Ewell and General G. W. Custis Lee and several battle-flags-eight have been turned over to the assistant adjutant-general of the corps, and four more are known to have been taken within the four days preceding and including that.

The troops felt the immense importance of success in this, the last battle fought by Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, and their marching and fighting was all that could be wished.

Accompanying this, I have the honor to submit the reports of brigade commanders, and again, expressing my full appreciation of their gallantry and skill, I ask that the services of these officers in all the operations of this division since the assault at Petersburg, on the 2nd instant, may meet with prompt acknowledgment.

I desire, in this connection, to submit the names of my efficient staff, and to thank them for the gallant service they have so continuously and faithfully rendered: Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel George Clendenin, jr., assistant adjutant-general, U. S. Volunteers; Lieutenant Colonel Rufus P. Lincoln, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, acting assistant inspector-general; Bvt. Major A. M. Tyler, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, assistant commissary of musters; Major Chester D. Cleveland, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, ordnance officer; Surg. Redford Sharp, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, surgeon-in-chief; Bvt. Major Miles L. Butterfield, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, acting engineer officer; Bvt. Major Solomon W. russell. forty-ninth New York Volunteers, provost marshal; Bvt. Majs. John Snodgrass, One hundred and thirty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and George A. Bernanrd, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, acting aides-de-camp; Captain Charles G. Finney, assistant quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers; Captain James G. Fitts, commissary of subsistence, U. S. Volunteers; Bvt. Captain Henry E. Hindmarsh, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, judge-advocate; First Lieutenant William J. Cooke, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, aide-de-camp; Captain James T. Stuart, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in charge of division sharpshooters.

The names of officers and enlisted men recommended for promotion and reward for distinguished service and meritorious conduct in the assault at Petersburg, April 2, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, have already been forwarded. Accompanying this report is a list of the casualties that occurred in the latter battle.

April 7, marched at 7 a. m., this division being the third in order of march of the corps, by the way of Rice’s Station, on the South Side Railroad, and Farmville, across the Appomattox River, going into bivouac one mile to the west of it at 9 p. m.

April 8, marched at 7 a. m., this division being second in order of march of the corps, via Curdsville and New Store, on the Buckingham Court-House plank road, going into bivouac at 9 p. m., two miles west of New Store.

April 9, marched at 5 a. m., this division being first in order of march of the corps, four miles toward Appomattox Court-House, where we halted until the Second Corps had moved out of camp, which occupied until 11 a. m., when we continued the advance. Massed within four miles of Appomattox Court-House at 1 p. m., to await the result of a conference between Generals Grant and Lee. At 5 p. m. received new of the unconditional surrender of Lee’s army, which caused the wildest enthusiasm and heartfelt joy among the troops. Went into camp upon receipt of that intelligence, and remained until April 11, when, at 7 a. m., this division, being third in order of march of the corps, marched back toward Burkeville, via New Store and Curdsville, and camped near Little Willis River.

April 12, marched at 6 a. m.,this division being second in order of march of the corps, via Farmville, and camped near Sandy River at 4 p. m.

April 13, marched at 7 a. m., this division being the leading division of the corps, via Rice’s Station, on the South Side Railroad, to Burkesville Junction, and went into camp one mile and a half east, facing south.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK WHEATON,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

Major C. H. WHITTELSEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Sixth Corps.
HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
April 15, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to send herewith six rebel battle-flags captured by the following-named men, and under the circumstances set opposite their respective names:

Second Brigade.-Battle-flag of Savannah Guards, captured by Private Warren C. Dockun,* Company H, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, two other enlisted men having been killed while attempting its capture in the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865.

Battle-flag (regiment unknown), captured by Private Benjamin Gifford,* Company H, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, in the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865.

Battle-flag (regiment unknown), captured by Corpl. Elijah A. Briggs,* Company B, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, in the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865.

Battle-flag (regiment unknown), captured by Sergt. Wesley Gibbs,* Company B, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, in the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865.

Third Brigade.-Battle-flag (regiment unknown), captured by Private Charles A. Taggart,* Company B, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865.

First Brigade.-Battle-flag Forty-sixth North Carolina, picked up on the picket-line by Lieutenant Brant,* Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, April 3, 1865.

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*Awarded a Medal of Honor.

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In additional to the above, the following flags were delivered to corps headquarters on the day of their capture, viz:

First Brigade.-Battle-flag (regiment unknown), captured by Private Frank Fewq,* Company A, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, in the rebel works at Petersburg, April 2, 1865; delivered to Major Franklin, commissary of musters.

Third Brigade.-Battle-flag (regiment unknown), captured by Corpl. Richard Welch,* Comany E, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, in the rebel works at Petersburg, April 2, 1865; delivered to Major Whittelsey, assistant adjutant-general.

Total number of flags turned in, eight.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. WHEATON,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

Major C. H. WHITTELSEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Sixth Corps.
HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
April 20, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following list of casualties among commissioned officers and enlisted men in my command in the action of the 6th instant.+

RECAPITULATION.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK WHEATON,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

Major C. H. WHITTELSEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Sixth Corps.

ADDENDA.
HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
April 18, 1865.

Major C. H. WHITTELSEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Sixth Corps:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following list of recommendation for promotion of officers in this division for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious services in the assault on Petersburg, April 2, 1865,

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*Awarded a Medal of Honor.

+Nominal list omitted.

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and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865, and the names of enlisted men deserving mention for conspicuous bravery and good service in the same engagements:

Bvt. Brigadier General William H. Penrose, colonel Fifteenth New Jersey volunteers, to be brigadier-general, U. S. Volunteers for distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s lines near Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Bvt. Brigadier General Joseph E. Hambilin, colonel Sixty-fifth New York volunteers, to be brigadier-general U. S. Volunteers for distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s lines near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and for conspicuous gallantry at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Colonel Oliver Edwards, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, to be brigadier-general U. S. Volunteers for distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s lines near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and for conspicuous gallantry at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865. (This officer has not yet received official notice of his promotion to brigadier-general by brevet, which was dated the 19th of last September; he had commanded a brigade since the battle of Cold Harbor.) Colonel Isaac C. Bassett, Eighty-second Pennsylvania volunteers, to be brigadier-general U. S. Volunteers for distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s lines near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and for conspicuous gallantry at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865. (This officer has not yet received official notice of his promotion to brigadier-general by brevet, dated the 19th of October last.) Colonel Thomas S. Allen, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, to be brigadier-general by brevet for distinguished gallantry at the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and to be brigadier-general for bravery and meritorious services at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Colonel Egbert Olcott, One hundred and Twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be brigadier-general by brevet for distinguished gallantry the assault on the enemy works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and to be brigadier-general for bravery and meritorious services at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865. The above-mentioned commanders are officers of very unusual merit,have every one of them commanded brigades in battle, and been repeatedly recommended for promotion. I cannot too highly estimate the great importance of their valued services during the assault on Petersburg and the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va.

For most valuable services and conspicuous gallantry at the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865, the following officer are recommended for promotion: Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel George Clendenin, jr., assistant adjutant-general, to be colonel by brevet; Lieutenant Colonel Rufus P. Lincoln, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, and acting assistant inspector-general, to be colonel by brevet; Bvt. Major A. M. Tyler, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, and acting commissary of musters, First Division, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet; Major Chester D. Cleveland, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, and ordnance officer, First Division, and additional aide-de-camp on the field, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet; Bvt. Major Miles L. Butterfield, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, and engineer officer, First Division, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet; Bvt. Major John Snodgrass, One hundred and thirty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, additional aide-de-camp, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet; Bvt. Major George A. Bernard, Sixty-fifth New York Volun-

teers, and additional aide-de-camp, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet; Bvt. Captain Henry E. Hidnmarsh, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, judge-advocate, First Division, to be major by brevet; First Lieutenant William J. Cooke, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, aide-de-camp, to be captain by brevet; Captain James T. Stuart, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in charge of division sharpshooters, to be major by brevet.

For valuable and highly meritorious services and marked attention to the duties of their respective departments, I have the honor to recommend for promotion by brevet: Surg. Redford Sharp, Fifteenth New Jersy Volunteers, surgeon-in-chief of this division, to the lieutenant-colonel by brevet; Captain James G. Fitts, commissary of subsistence, First Division, Sixth corps, to be major by brevet; Captain Charles G. Finney, assistant quartermaster, First Division, Sixth Corps, to be major by brevet; neither of these gentlemen has received any official recognition of his valuable services during the entire campaign of 1864.

For distinguished gallantry and most valuable services at the assault on the enemy’s works at Petersburg, April 2, 1865, I have the honor to recommend: Captain Crawford Allen, jr., commanding Battery H, First Rhode Island Light Artillery Volunteers, to be major by brevet; First Lieutenant Walter M. Knight, Company H, First Rhode Island Light Artillery Volunteers, to be captain by brevet; Second Lieutenant Anthony B. Horton, Company H, First Rhode Island Light Artillery Volunteers, to be captain by brevet; Second Lieutenant Anthony B. Horton, Company H, First Rhode Island Light Artillery Volunteers, to be first lieutenant by brevet.

The following recommendations for the First Brigade are made: Lieutenant Colonel Baldwin Hufty, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, to be colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Major Ebenezer W. Davis, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Major James W. McNeely, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Major J. Augustus Fay, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., april 2, 1865; Bvt. Major Charles R. Paul, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, and acting assistant adjutant-general, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Bvt. Major William McElhaney, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, and acting assistant inspector-general to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain James w. Penrose, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant John R. McCauley, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant Jonathan Maguire, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain Joseph R. Wells, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant W. S. Ackley, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain by brevet

for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First. Lieutenant William Brant, jr., Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant E. R. Howard, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain John Wilson, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain John P. Crater, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain Dayton E. Flint, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain James H. Comings, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be brevet major for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., april 2, 1865; First Lieutenant H. Edward Lewis, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain Charles E. Grant, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain A. J. Manderville, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain Ellwood Lippincott, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; Captain John W. Goodenough, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant Samuel w. Downs, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant George W. Breen, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, to be captain for conspicuous gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

The following recommendations for officers of the Second Brigade are made: Colonel James Hubbard, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be brigadier-general by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Lieutenant Colonel Henry C. Fisk, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, to be colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Lieutenant Colonel John Harper, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Major Augustus H. Fenn, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s

Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Charles H. Woodman, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain James Deane, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain David Gordon, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry an distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant Morris C. Foot, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault upon the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Major Edward W. Jones, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Major James W. Cronkite, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain John S. Kidder, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain James Johnson, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Hiram C. Van Scoy, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Michael Kelly, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished service in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, an at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Michael Devine, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Frederick J. Volks, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and

at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Charles J. C. Ball, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant Lewis Munger, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished service in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant Homer S. Curtiss, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant Frank E. Lowe, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant Thomas J. Hassett, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Second Lieutenant Charles F. Anderson, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, to be first lieutenant by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and distinguished services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865.

The following recommendations for offices of the Third Brigade are made: Lieutenant Colonel E. H. Rhodes, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, to be colonel by brevet for gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Lieutenant Colonel Gideon Clark, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be colonel by brevet for marked gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Lieutenant Colonel James R. Neiler, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be colonel by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Bvt. Major Edwin A. Landel, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Thomas G. Colt, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, acting assistant adjutant-general to Colonel Edwards, to be major by brevet for marked gallantry and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain William A. Wiedersheim, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, additional aide-de-camp to Colonel Edwards, to be major by brevet for marked gallantry

and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant Jos. W. P. Roberts, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for marked gallantry and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Albert Ivers, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be major by brevet for marked gallantry and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; Captain William H. Kinght, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be major by brevet for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant and Adjt. B. Theodore Northrop, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant James Colwell, eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Henry C. Warner, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be major by brevet for gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865; First Lieutenant David S. Hassinger, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for gallant find meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieut James Dutton, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet, for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant thomas Morris, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Henry Curran, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, to be major by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; Captain Archibald Hopkins, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, to be major by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, va., April 6, 1865; Captain J. C. Robinson, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, to be major by brevet for gallant and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Captain Jonas A. Champney, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant and Adjt. J. S. Bradley, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant William C. Morrill, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and

at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; Bvt. Major F. W. Wombacker, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be lieutenant-colonel by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; Captain William H. Byers, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be major by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant and Adjt. J. B. Downing, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, April 6, 1865; First Lieutenant Frank S. Halliday, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, to be captain by brevet for conspicuous bravery and meritorious services in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and at the battle of Little Sailore’s Creek, April 6, 1865; Second Lieutenant John K. Dorrance, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, to be first lieutenant by brevet for gallantry in the assault on the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

The following-named enlisted men of the First Brigade are recommended to the general commanding the corps, as deserving of special mention and reward for conspicuous bravery and good conduct: Sergt. Samuel D. Appleby, Company I, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, carried the colors, and was the first to enter the enemy’s works, April 2, 1865; Sergt. Jasper Archer, Company D, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, carried the colors in advance of his regiment during the assault; Sergeant Jones, Company G, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, carried the colors until disabled and obliged to leave the field; Corpl. William A. Burnett, Company G, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, was wounded but remained on the field fighting; Sergt. Thomas McElhany, Company B, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, was conspicuous in his actions of encouraging the men forward; Corporal Koerner, Company E, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, helped to capture a rebel battery and fire it upon the retreating rebels, was badly wounded while so engaged; First Sergeant Sparks, Company I, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, in command of the company and gallantly led it in action; First Sergeant Moyer, Company K, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, in command of the company and gallantly led it in action; Sergt. A. C. Wilson, Company A, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, encouraging and leading the men in action; Private Henry B. Paxton, Company I, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, in advance of his comrades at the assault; Private Abraham Palmer, Company A, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, particularly distinguished himself for gallantry; Private William H. McKeen, Company A, Tenth New Jersey Volunteers, particularly distinguished himself for gallantry: Color-Sergt. Peter S. Gunderman, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous for gallantry; Private Wilson Housel, Company G, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Corpl. James V. Hoff, Company E, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Corpl. Daniel W. Kithcart, Company e, Fifteenth New Jersey volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Sergt. Robert Holt, Company A, Second Battalion New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Corpl. David B. Husted, Company A, Third Battalion New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Sergt Major Christian A. Volk, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry in leading his company; First Sergt. Richard V. Cueman, Company H, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry in leading his company; First Sergt.

George W. Grover, Company I, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry in leading his company; First Sergt. John McNamara, Company K, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, for conspicuous gallantry in leading his company; Color-Sergt. John Prior, Company G, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, in advance of the regiment with his colors; Private John McGuire, Company F, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers; Private John Foley, Company F, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers; Private John Riley, Company K, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers; Private Jabez W. Carey, Company H, Fortieth New Jersey Volunteers, pioneers of the regiment, gallantry for charging ahead of their regiment and cutting the abatis.

The following-named enlisted men of the Second Brigade are recommended to the general commanding the corps as deserving special mention and reward for conspicuous bravery and good conduct: Corpl. Alijah A. Briggs, Company B, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, for capturing a rebel battle-flag in the assault; Private George R. Walker, Company F, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, for capturing a rebel battle-flag in the assault; Corpl. Thomas Daley, Company L, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, was the first man of his regiment on the enemy’s works in the assault, April 2, 1865, and through wounded, refused to leave the field; Sergt. Wesley Gibbs, Company B, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, capturing a rebel battle-flag in the battle of Little Sailor’s Creek, Va.; Corpl. Homer S. Sackett, Company H, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, capturing without assistance the colonel and major of a Georgia regiment on the 6th instant; Private Dennis Moore, Company K, Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Volunteers, assisting in the capture of Brigadier General Custis Lee; Private Warren C. Dockun, Company H, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, capturing a rebel battle-flag; Private Benjamin Gifford, Company H, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, capturing a rebel battle-flag; Private Benjamin Gifford, Company H, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, capturing a rebel battle-flag; Private Benjamin Gifford, Company H, One hundred and twenty-first new York Volunteers, capturing a rebel battle-flag; Private Benjamin Gifford, Company H, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, capturing a rebel battle-flag; Sergt. Redford Dustin, Company F, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, firing a captured gun upon the enemy; Private Harris S. Hawthron, Company F, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, firing a captured gun upon the enemy; Private Harris S. Hawthron, Company F, One hundred and twenty-first New York Volunteers, captured Brigadier General [G. W.] Custis Lee, on the 6th instant; Private Francis Sprowl, Company F, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, was the first man in his regiment in the rebel works on the 2nd instant, and twice loaded and fired one of the captured pieces on the retreating enemy; Color-Sergt. patrick Leavins, Company H, Sixty-fifth New

York Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry on the 2nd instant; Corpl. Barney Farrell, Company G, Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry on 2nd instant; Color-Sergt. Albert J. Bannen, Company C, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assisting in the capture of rebel guns on the 2nd instant; Corpl. Francis A. Wilson, Company B, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assisting in the capture of rebel guns on the 2nd instant; Private Hosea B. Taylor, Company B, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assisting in the capture of rebel guns on the 2nd instant; Private John McLaughlin, Company G, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assisting in the capture of rebel guns on the 2nd instant; Private Wiliam R. Fox, Company A, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, assisting in the capture of rebel guns on the 2nd instant; Corpl. Albert w. Scott, Company C, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Corpl. Robert D. Wilson, Company C, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, conspicuous gallantry; Sergt. Major James S. Day, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, gallant and meritorious conduct

on the 6th instant; Corpl. Albert W. Scott, Company C, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, gallant and meritorious conduct on the 6th instant.

The following-named enlisted men of the Third Brigade are recommended to the general commanding the corps as deserving special mention and reward for conspicuous bravery and good conduct: Private William Railton, Company E, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, for gallantry, being one of the first of his regiment to enter the enemy’s works on the 2nd instant; Color-Sergt. William J. Babcock, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, for gallantry, being one of the first of his regiment to enter the enemy’s works on the

2nd instant; Color-Corpl. Thomas Parker, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, for gallantry, being one of the first of his regiment to enter the enemy’s works on the 2nd instant; Corpl. Maurice, O. Hearn, Company-, Second Rhode Island Volunteers, for gallantry, being one of the first of his regiment to enter the enemy’s works on the 2nd instant; Sergt. Samuel M. Bolton, Company C, Thirty-seveth Massachusetts Volunteers, for conspicuous bravery in the assault on the 2nd instant; Corpl. Richard Welch, Company E, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, for conspicuous bravery in capturing a rebel stand of colors; Private Charles A. Taggart, Company B, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, for capturing a rebel stand of colors; Corpl. S. J. dean, guished bravery, April 2, 1865; Corpl. William McCue, Company B, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers,* for capturing a rebel stand of colors; Sergt. George W. Johnson, Company K, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for being one of the first of the regiment to enter the enemy’s works and secure two pieces of artillery, April 2, 1865; Private Lewis J. Danlap, Company F, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for being one of the first of he regiment to enter the enemy’s works and secure two pieces of artillery, April 2, 1865; Private Samuel Winterbottom, Company A, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for being one of the first of the regiment to enter the enemy’s works and secure two pieces of artillery; Color-Sergt. Henry Entriken, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous bravery, April 2, 1865; Corpl. John T. Hall, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for conspicuous bravery, April 2, 1865; Corpl. August Franz, Company A, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Sergt. A. Q. Smith, Company B, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Sergt. F. T. Smith, Company B, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Sergt. Angus Cameron, Company C, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Drummer George Deverney, Company C, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; First Sergt. James Young, Company D, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Color-Sergt. R. H. Langton, Company F, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Corpl. A. B. Day, Company G, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865; Sergt. R. Elwell, Company K, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for distinguished services, April 2, 1865.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. WHEATON,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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*Probably Eighty-second Pennsylvania-see p. 945.

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Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLVI, Part 1 (Serial Number 95), pp. 909-926

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