Number 220. Petersburg Campaign Reports of Captain John M. Kesselmark, Forty-sixth New York Infantry, of operations August 19 – 21

   

0 comments

in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

Numbers 220. Reports of Captain John M, Kesselmark, Forty-sixth New York Infantry, of operations August 19 – 21.1

HDQRS. FORTY-SIXTH Regiment NEW YORK STATE VET. VOLS.,
August 25, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report in following the part the Forty-sixth Regiment New York State Volunteers took in the engagement of August 19, 1864, adding a list of casualties:

The Forty-sixth Regiment New York State Volunteers arrived near the Weldon railroad on the morning of August 19. About 5 p. m. heavy firing was heard, indicating an attack by the enemy, whereupon the regiment formed in line and moved forward with the brigade, arriving upon an open field on this side of a pine wood. The regiment received the fire of the enemy, losing several men in killed and wounded. Seeing several regiments belonging to the Fifth Army Corps in full retreat, our brigade charged forward and entered the forest, the enemy slowly retreating. Arriving at about half distance of the depth of the forest, our line of battle, which was somewhat broken, was re-established and a final charge made, which brought us in possession of the breast-works taken by the enemy from the Fifth Army Corps. Here we made a number of prisoners and occupied the breast-works during the night, being relieved the next morning by the First Brigade, Third Division, Ninth Army Corps.

Very respectfully, yours,

JOHN M. KESSELMARK,

Captain, Commanding.

Captain THOMAS MATHEWS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.
HDQRS. FORTY-SIXTH Regiment NEW YORK STATE VET. VOLS.,
August 27, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the morning of the 20th instant the regiment was relieved from picket duty and marched back to the open field bordering on the pine wood, where the same was employed during the day in building trenches near the aforesaid wood. Fifteen men of my command remained in the skirmish line, of which number, one was wounded. Toward evening the trenches were, upon order, taken down and the ground leveled. About 4 o’clock on the next morning, the 21st instant, the regiment marched farther back, and stopped several hundred yards behind the Yellow House, where several batteries were in position. Here the regiment remained during the attack, losing by one solid cannon shot two men, viz, one killed and one severely wounded. After the attack was repulsed the regiment marched near the wood in the rear, where it built trenches, and remained during the day. The regimental surgeon, Dr. Otto Schenck, was wounded on this day by a chance shot, which fell far behind the regiment in the rear, in consequence of which wound he died the next day.

Very respectfully,

JOHN M. KESSELMARK,

Captain, Commanding.

Captain THOMAS MATHEWS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), page 598

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: