Number 183. Petersburg Campaign Reports of Captain Charles Barlow, One hundred and twenty-first Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations October 27-28 and December 7-12

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

No. 183. Reports of Captain Charles Barlow, One hundred and twenty-first Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations October 27-28 and December 7-12.1

HDQRS. 121ST REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS,
October 30, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and twenty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers in the recent operations:

The regiment broke camp at 4 o’clock on the morning of the 27th instant, and took upon the line of march in a southwesterly direction to near a saw-mill attached to the Armstrong property. We then advanced in line of battle into the woods in front, the regiment forming the extreme left of the brigade. Meeting the enemy’s skirmishers about 3 p. m. succeeded in driving them across a small stream. We then halted, lying in line of battle for the night and withdrew early on the following morning across the stream. The regiment was then thrown out on picket, remaining about two hours, when we were ordered to fall back by the division officer of the day to our old camp near the Yellow House, reaching it toward evening of the 28th instant.

Casualties: Serg. William Beck, Company A, and Private William S. Anderson, Company F, wounded.

Respectfully submitted.

CHARLES BARLOW,

Captain, Commanding 121st Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Captain J. HARRISON LAMBDIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.
HDQRS. 121ST REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS,
December 14, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part take by the One hundred and twenty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers in the recent operations toward Weldon, N. C.:

At 6,30 a. m. on the 7th instant the regiment broke camp near Petersburg, Va., and took up the line of march on the Jerusalem plank road

in a southeasterly direction, reaching the Nottoway River at 1 p. m., where we halted. At 5 p. m. we closed the river and marched to within on mile and a half of Sussex Court-House, where we bivouacked for the night. Distance marched, eighteen miles. On the morning of the 8th we continued our march forward, passing through Sussex Court-House and Coman’s Well Near the latter place the regiment was deployed as skirmishers, and marched through a dense wood, but no enemy was found on our front. Toward evening the regiment was turned toward the railroad leading to Weldon, striking it in the vicinity of Jarratt’s Station, and commenced immediately to burn the ties and destroy the rails. At 9.30 p. m. we stopped the work for the night, and encamped within a short distance of the railroad, having marched during the day nine miles. On the 9th the regiment assisted all day in the destruction of the railroad, and encamped for the night in the woods about two miles from Meherrin River. On the 10th the regiment was ordered back on a road running nearly parallel with the Jerusalem plank road, and intersecting it near Sussex Court-House, which latter place, after some very severe marching, we reached at 10 a. m. on the 11th instant, being deployed on the flank of the marching column. The regiment recrossed the Nottoway on the afternoon of the same day, and encamped fifteen miles to our old camping-ground, near the Yellow House, arriving here at 4 p. m.

The conduct of the officers and men during the whole movement was highly creditable. But three stragglers were reported at these headquarters, they being notorious skulkers. Two of them were returned last evening under guard form army headquarters, and were disposed of in a manner calculated to prevent a repetition of the offense. The other man, whose name accompanies this report in the list of casualties, straggled on the south side of the Nottoway, and it is thought was picked up by the enemy’s cavalry.

Respectfully submitted.

CHAS. BARLOW,

Captain, Commanding 121st Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Captain J. HARRISON LAMBDIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 532-533

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