Number 60. Report of Lieutenant Charles H. Dygert, One hundred and fifty-second New York Infantry, of operations October 26-28

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

No. 60. Report of Lieutenant Charles H. Dygert, One hundred and fifty-second New York Infantry, of operations October 26-28.1

HDQRS.152nd REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, October 29, 1864.

I have the honor to report that this command broke camp on the afternoon of October 26, and marched some seven miles to a point across the Weldon railroad, which point we reached about 10 p.m. and bivouacked. At 3 a.m. [27th] the march was resumed. We went down the Weldon road about two miles, where we turned to the right. After marching a short distance, and soon after daybreak, we were formed in line of battle and advanced in rear of Third Brigade, passed over a line of works, and moved by the flank to the right, where we again formed in line of battle and threw out a line of skirmishers. At this place Corpl. John Weeks, Company H, was wounded by the accidental discharge of a musket. The regiment was deployed at intervals of two paces and advanced, driving the enemy from their works. There were but few of them there, and but slight resistance made by them. we remained there about one hour, and then moved to an open field near Burgess’ farm, where we again formed in line of battle. The enemy opened a battery in front, and one man of Company A, Private Charles C. Watson, was killed. The Second Brigade moved up and formed in line immediately in front and advanced in line of battle, our brigade following up. We halted on the crest of a hill remained there about one-half hour, when we moved by the flank up the Boydton road and formed in line on the left of the Burgess house. While there the enemy opened a battery on the left, and kept up incessant shelling for about half an hour. We then moved double-quick to the right of the Burgess house, where we formed in line in front of a battery, and under a severe shelling from both front and left flank. While in that

position Captain Willard A. Musson was instantly killed by a shell. We remained in this position till sunset, when we tore down and old barn, using the boards for making breast-works, which we rested behind until 9 p.m. While here Private Chauncey Kelsey, Company C, was killed by a musket-ball. We then moved about half a mile to the rear and formed in line of battle on the right of the Boydton road. About mid-night we moved to a point near where the first line of works was taken by the Third Brigade, and halted till daylight [28th], when we again formed in line of battle and remained until noon. From that place we returned to the encampment which we at present occupy.

Very respectfully,

C. H. DYGERT,

First Lieutenant, Commanding Regiment.

Lieutenant GILDER,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 314-315

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