Number 33. Reports of Lieutenant Colonel Joseph M. Murphy, Seventh New York Heavy Artillery, Fourth Brigade, of operations August 12-25

   

1 comment

in Part 1 (Serial Number 87)

Numbers 33. Reports of Lieutenant Colonel Joseph M. Murphy, Seventh New York Heavy Artillery, Fourth Brigade, of operations August 12-25.1

HDQRS. SEVENTH NEW YORK VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY,
In the Field, near Petersburg, Va., October 9, 1864.

LIEUTENANT:*

From August 12 to August 20, 1864:

Left camp near Petersburg August 12 at 2 p.m. Halted for the night at 6 p.m. near City Point, and there remained until noon the next day, when the regiment left for City Point and embarked on transports and anchored off City Point, remaining there until the morning of the 14th, when the regiment was taken to Deep Bottom, arriving there are 1 p.m. Immediately marched to the front, and advanced in line of battle to an open field, remaining there until 9 p.m., when it fell back to the woods, and there camped for two days. On the 16th moved to the right with the Fourth Brigade to the support of the Tenth Corps. The regiment then did picket duty for two days and then returned to the left, remaining there till the evening of the 20th, when it marched to the front of Petersburg, arriving at its old camp at 8 a.m. on the morning of the 21st. Casualties, 6 killed, 14 wounded, 3 missing.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. MURPHY,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Seventh New York, Artillery, Commanding.

Lieutenant J. WENDEL MUFFLY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

—————

*For portion of report here omitted, see Vol. XL, Part I, p. 365.

—————

Report of operations of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery from August 21 to August 25, 1864:

About 10 a.m. on the 21st instant, after a brief rest on its return from Deep Bottom, the regiment marched toward the left and finally halted by the line of the Weldon railroad. 22d, the whole regiment was detailed to tear up the track, pile up the ties and burn them. 23rd and 24th, the work of destroying the railroad continued during both these days. 25th, about 10 a.m. the regiment was marched into a piece of pine woods to support the skirmish line threatened by the enemy’s cavalry. At 12 o’clock was marched to Reams’ Station and placed in the breast-works just to the left of the station. Shortly after the enemy appeared and charged immediately upon our front. This attempt to reach our breast-works was three times repeated and each time repulsed. On the fourth charge of the enemy the right of our brigade gave way and the enemy, swarming over the breast-works, drove our men from the pit. The artillerymen belonging to the battery placed on our right being most of them disabled, our men served the pieces until the ammunition was expended, as they did also one of the pieces of the battery in position on the hill in the second line of works.

J. M. MURPHY,

Major Seventh New York Heavy Artillery, Commanding.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XLII, Part 1 (Serial Number 87), pages 276-277

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: