UPR: Report of Major Thomas J. Wooten, commanding Sharpshooter Battalion, Lane’s Brigade, of operations June 22, 1864

   

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in Unpublished Reports Volume XL

Editor’s Note: Brett Schulte recently noticed this report transcribed online among the James H. Lane Papers at the Auburn University Archives web site.  Permission was asked for and granted by Auburn University Libraries, Department of Special Collections & University Archives to reproduce these transcriptions here at The Siege of Petersburg Online.  These transcriptions are copyrighted by Auburn University Libraries, Department of Special Collections & University Archives and may not be reproduced without their express written consent.  The transcription attribution reads as follows: “Transcriptions made by Terri Stout-Stevens, Pfafftown, NC, in 1997 and 1998.  Edited by Marty Olliff, Assistant Archivist, Auburn University, who takes all responsibility for any errors.”

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[Editor's Note: Major Hale of James H. Lane's staff wrote a letter on September 23, 1864, asking Major T. J. Wooten of the brigade sharpshooter battalion for a report of operations on June 22, 1864 at the Battle of Jerusalem Plank Road.  Hale's letter follows below prior to the report of Major Wooten.]

Hd. Qtrs & C. Sept 23 1864
Maj:

Genl. Wilcox has called on me for a “synopsis” of what we did on the 22d of June – seining.  Will you be kind enough to send me, for my use, a short account of what you and your corps did on that occasion.  Please let it cover these three points, viz: 1st, How far do you think it was from the road where we first formed line of battle to the point where we (7th & 33d Regts) fought the enemy in their works; 2nd, How long did the fight last; 3d, Did you or any of  your officers or men see the yankee breastworks?

You might [sketch] it below here.  If you can make it out at once you will greatly oblige me.

Yours, E.J. Hale, Jr. A.A.G.1

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Editor’s Note: Wooten’s report in response to Hale’s request follows.

Unpublished Report of Major Thomas J. Wooten, commanding Sharpshooter Battalion, Lane’s Brigade, of operations June 22, 18642

Sept 24 1864

Capt: I am sorry that I cannot give you a complete report of our “seining” this 22nd June.  I did not get to the skirmishers till they were very near the Yankee works.  Lt. Pearson says it was better in a 1/4 and 1/2 mile from where we first formed to the place where we fought them.  When I reached the skirmish line the Yankee skirmishers, it seems had fled within their works, as they did not open on our Advancing line.  We advanced without being fired upon, to the edge of a field; here, I halted the line, and ordered them to lie down, till I could report to Col [John D.] Barry, what was in my front.  On the right of my line, I am confident the enemies works were not more than fifty y’ds distant, and from the left about one-hundred.  I saw several stands of Colors along their lines before the Brigade came up but could see no men;  On my right the line of “Battle” (Scales), did not come up to skirmish line, and on this account several of our wounded fell into the hands of the enemy.  The Brigade was engaged 3/4 of an hr. before it fell back from the edge of the woods.  Their works was visible along my whole line.  A portion of my line was in front of Scales.

Very  Res.

T. J. Wooten

Sources:

  1. Hale, E J., Jr. (1864, September 23). (Letter to Major T. J. Wooten). James H. Lane Papers (RG 501, Box 2, number 81). Auburn University Libraries Department of Special Collections & University Archives, Auburn, AL.
  2. Wooten, Thomas J. (1864, September 24). (Official Report sent to E. J. Hale, Jr.). James H. Lane Papers (RG 501, Box 2, number 81). Auburn University Libraries Department of Special Collections & University Archives, Auburn, AL.

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