Number 119. Petersburg Campaign Report of Major John D. Lentz, Ninety-First Pennsylvania Infantry

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 80)

No. 119. Report of Major John D. Lentz, Ninety-first Pennsylvania Infantry.1

HDQRS. NINETY-FIRST Regiment PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.,
In the Trenches, near Petersburg, Va., August 9, 1864.

CAPTAIN: *

FIFTH EPOCH.

At 4.30 a.m. [June 13] struck tents and moved in the direction of the Chickahominy; crossed on pontoons at daylight. 13th; resumed the march in an easterly direction; halted and threw up works. Marched at 7.30 p.m. southeasterly, reaching a field near Charles City Court-House, and pitched tents; received orders, with One hundred and fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, to leave the brigade; transferred to Second Brigade, First Division, by order from Fifth Corps headquarters. June 15, joined Second Brigade, First Division, near Charles City Court-House. Left 4 a.m. 16th (with brigade); crossed the James River at 9 a.m., reached an old rebel camp three miles south of Petersburg about 12 p.m.; bivouacked for the night. 11 a.m. 18th formed line of battle with Thirty-second Massachusetts, Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry (dismounted), and One hundred and fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, all placed under the command of Colonel E. M. Gregory, Ninety-first Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers; advanced upon the enemy, drove him across the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad; remained on the north bank of the railroad a short time; advanced again, driving him into his intrenchments about a quarter of a mile from the railroad, and threw up breast-works. Was attacked about 11 p.m.; drove him back. Kept up the fire during the night; relieved by a portion of Crawford’s division. 4.30 a.m. [19th] retired on the railroad and bivouacked. Left the railroad 9.30 p.m. 20th, moved southeast of the railroad half a mile, and bivouacked for the night. Left again 10 a.m. 21st, moved toward the left of the line, halted 12 m. on the Chieves farm; the left wing of the regiment sent out as skirmishers on the right of the Jerusalem plank road, the balance of the regiment, with the Sixty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, following about 3 p.m., and took position to support the skirmish line. Advanced about half a mile, driving the enemy’s picket-line before us and establishing the line; threw up breast-works and remained until about 4 a.m. 23d; were relieved by the First Brigade; ordered to the left of the plank road in position on the ground where a portion of the Second Corps had been driven the night previous. Remained until 9 a.m., was relieved by the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery, and returned to camp half a mile east of Chieves’ house. Struck tents at 6 p.m. on the 24th and moved to the left of the line about two miles south of Chieves’ house, near the Jerusalem plank road, to support the Sixth Corps. Threw up breast-works; remained until 6 p.m. 25th; were relieved by the Corcoran Legion and returned to camp, where we remained, sending details for working parties from the 6th to the 20th of July. 3 a.m. 21st relieved the Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry dismounted) on the front (on the left Jerusalem turnpike); found the works and camp in a filthy condition; devoted all spare time in cleaning up and reconstructing the works, leaving a detail at old camp for guard.

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* For portion of report (here omitted) covering operations from May 4 to June 12, 1864, see Vol. XXXVI, Part I, p.555.

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26th, commenced a new line of breast-work to the right of the road. 8 a.m. 27th discontinued working and moved 8 p.m. 28th to relieve First Brigade, Second Division, about one mile to the right, reaching the works at 10 p.m. The front line being occupied by the One hundred and fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers and Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry (dismounted), this command, with Twenty-second Massachusetts Volunteers, bivouacked in the rear for the night. On the 29th formed a new line and built bomb-proofs. 1 a.m. 30th packed headquarters wagons; left old camp with the guard and joined the command at the front. Action commenced at 4.20 a.m. 30th, by destroying the enemy’s fort in front of the Ninth Corps, followed by heavy firing along the line until 10.30, the regiment taking no part in this action.

The casualties from May 4 to July 30 are as follows: Commissioned officers-wounded, 6. Enlisted men-killed, 44; wounded, 128; missing, 2; total, 174. Aggregate, 180.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN D. LENTZ,

Major, Commanding.

Captain J. D. McFARLAND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 461-462

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