Number 114. Petersburg Campaign Report of Major General Gouverneur K. Warren, U. S. Army, commanding Fifth Army Corps, of operations July 27-30

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 80)

Numbers 114. Report of Major General Gouverneur K. Warren, U. S. Army, commanding Fifth Army Corps, of operations July 27-30.1

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, August 5, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit the accompanying communications as my report of the part taken by my corps in the operations of the 30th of July, 1864, and preliminary thereto. The communications contain all the contingent and positive instructions in regard to covering the left flank, maintaining the front, and supporting General Burnside’s assault, and fully explain the part the corps took, and was designed to take, in the operations. They also contain a general statement of the amount of labor performed in the siege operations, and conclude with the report of Colonel Wainwright, chief of artillery.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.

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*Of August 3, 1864. See p. 483.

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CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 26, 1864-8.15 p. m.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Army Corps:

I am instructed to inform you that General Hancock is moving his corps across the James River, and that General Sheridan, with two divisions of cavalry, is likewise moving across it. It is supposed that this movement will induce the enemy to send a considerable part of his force now in our front toward Richmond, and that an opportunity will be presented to attack him here. Should it occur, an assault will be made from Burnside’s front, preceded by the springing of his mine, which is now being prepared for explosion. In such case you will be required to support Burnside’s attack, concentrating your force on his left. This will require the abandonment of a part of the front you now hold. The commanding general desires you to have in view the arrangements necessary to carry out such project, and to be prepared to execute orders to that effect. The mine cannot probably be fully prepared before to-morrow night.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 27, 1864-9.30 a. m.

Major-General WARREN:

I think it extremely probable the effect of Hancock’s movement may produce an attempt on the part of the enemy to turn and attack our left flank. I therefore desire you will keep in view the contingency of holding your intrenchments with the minimum force, and being prepared to send any available movable force to the left and rear.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 27, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

A report from General McIntosh, commanding cavalry on our left, announces the enemy’s infantry in force on the plank road abreast of Lee’s Mill, and the running of trains all night. My inference is that the disappearance of Hancock’s corps has been mistaken for a raid on the Weldon railroad, and troops have been thrown to meet [it]. I now expect, when the real position of Hancock is known, they will try our left and rear. I have ordered Burnside to send two brigades to occupy the works vacated on your left by Hancock.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 27, 1864-10 a. m.

Major-General MEADE:

I have received your dispatch in relation to our left. The preparations for the contingency you mention, and for the opposite one mentioned by General Humphreys last night, require nearly the same preliminary preparations. I will send by an orderly a report on my arrangements.

Respectfully,
G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 27, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,
Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: After careful study of my position in view of the operations which I am to support in General Burnside’s front, as well as the holding the left, both combine to convince me that I cannot well abandon any part of my line without giving up all of it, and that then the best co-operation I could afford with my artillery would be lost. The line as now fortified is pretty strong. I propose to make the following disposition of my troops:

First. General Crawford’s division to hold from the plank road around to the left. It is all in position, though scarcely at present in contact with the enemy. It is 4,336 strong; one brigade in and around the large redoubt, one brigade (Baxter’s) in and around the small redoubt, one brigade on picket. These are all available for the defense of the left, and in case we wish to attack on the front, Baxter’s could be calculated upon being withdrawn.

Second. General Griffin’s division, 4,979 strong, will, I think, by putting them all in one line, hold the front now occupied by it and a portion of General Ayres.’

Third. General Ayres’ division, 4,758 strong, will then all be in reserve, either for attack or defense.

Fourth. General Cutler, 1,959 strong, on the left of General Burnside, has a front so narrow as to have something over two lines of battle, the rear one of which can be withdrawn in the daytime. I propose to let this remain as a support to General Burnside, to be called away if needed to the left after our other reserves are exhausted. I probably can send 3,000 men to re-enforce our left when needed.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 27, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have 1,900 men in working details to-day, which will considerably diminish the number I can count upon to send off suddenly to any other place. I think we should suspend the siege order for the present.

Respectfully,
G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 27, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

General McIntosh, commanding cavalry brigade picketing on the left, reports that the statement made respecting 500 infantry on the plank road is entirely unfounded. That being so, as to siege-works going on are chiefly those for the secure approach to the batteries, the commanding general [thinks] that they might be continued.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 27, 1864-9.30 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Is the contingency you desired me to prepare for in your confidential communication last night likely to take place to-morrow morning?

Respectfully,
G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 27, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

The contingency referred to is not likely to take place to-morrow morning, nor even to-morrow.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 28, 1864-1.30 p. m.

Major-General WARREN:

GENERAL: It has been decided to attempt an assault of the enemy’s lines in front of the Ninth Corps, after exploding the mine. Your part in this work will be co-operating, by the use of all the artillery possible along your line, the holding your corps in readiness to take part in the action, and particularly all available reserve free for the immediate support of Burnside, if necessary. Further instructions will be sent you. The present note is given to General Hunt, chief of artillery, that he may consult with you as to posting the artillery.

Respectfully, &c.,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 28, 1864-10.45 p. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE,
Commanding Ninth Corps,

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

The major-general commanding directs me to say that, by direction of the lieutenant-general commanding the armies, all artillery firing, except from field pieces, will cease until further orders, and the heavy pieces will be concealed from the view of the enemy.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

[For orders from headquarters Army of the Potomac, of July 29, 1864 (here omitted), see Appendix K, to proceedings of Court of Inquiry, p. 134.]
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 29, 1864-4 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have received the programme order for operations to-morrow. I think the minimum of troops that I can depend upon holding my front line with is Griffin’s division, which forms a single line of

battle, with one brigade of General Cutler’s. This will leave me one brigade of General Cutler’s, and General Ayres’ division, at least, to support General Burnside. If I can withdraw the most of my picket-line, and abandon the southernmost redoubt on the plank road I can also have two brigades of General Crawford to aid General Burnside. I would like special instructions on this point. In the event of success the division of Crawford would be well posted to follow up along the plank road. I am going to consult with General Burnside as to the co-operation he wishes me to give.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 29, 1864-5.40 p. m.

Major-General WARREN, Commanding Fifth Corps:

Your dispatch of 4 p. m. received, and the commanding general directs the withdrawal of your troops to-night from the southernmost redoubt and beyond, south of the large redoubt on the plank road. The pickets should remain, and, if forced back, might occupy the works south of the large redoubt.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,
Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1864-4.45 p. m. (Received 5 p. m.)

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

The commanding general desires to keep up the impression that the enemy evidently entertains that we are withdrawing from before Petersburg, and with that view wishes that the camps of such of your troops as are not necessary to the defense of your line, and as may be in the view of the enemy, should be struck and the troops moved off as though intended to cross the James River at Deep Bottom. After moving so far into the woods as to be unobserved by the enemy they should halt, and return after dark. The two brigades of Burnside’s corps holding the intrenchments between the plank road and the old Norfolk road are directed to rejoin General Burnside as soon as it is dark, taking their pickets.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

The troops should not know they are making a feint movement. Field’s division, of Longstreet’s corps, moved to the James River last night, leaving two divisions of Beauregard’s corps and one of Hill’s for the Petersburg front.

A. A. H.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 29, 1864-5. p. m.

General HUMPHREYS:

I have no troops that I can move in sight of the enemy without causing them to be severely shelled at close range; in fact, all are out of sight except in the trenches.

Respectfully,
G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 29, 1864.

1. The mine in General Burnside’s front will be sprung to-morrow at 3.30 a. m., to be immediately followed by a column of assault.

2. General Ayres’ division will go into position under cover of the railroad cut in rear of General Cutler’s division, with the right in front, and both his division and the reserve brigade of General Cutler’s will be prepared at 3.30 a. m. to support the column of attack, whenever it may be required, and await orders.

3. The brigade of General Cutler’s division in the front line and the division under General Bartlett will open fire with musketry, along with the artillery, as soon as the mine is sprung, the object being to keep down the fire of the enemy’s artillery and musketry. They will have an ample supply of ammunition convenient to replenish their cartridge-boxes.

4. General Crawford will have General Baxter’s brigade in readiness at 3.30 a. m. to move up to the position assigned General Ayres, but to await orders in its present position.

5. The artillery of the corps along the front will receive its orders from the chief of artillery of the army, through the chief of artillery of the corps.

6. The pioneers will all be with their brigades prepared to remove obstructions, and the wagons of intrenching tools will all be in readiness to move speedily wherever needed. The ammunition train will also be prepared to supply ammunition, either by wagons or on pack-mules.

7. Headquarters office will remain at the Avery house, but with everything in readiness to move. At the commencement of operations to-morrow the general commanding the corps will be found near the battery of six 4 1/2-inch guns west of the Avery house. The medical director of the corps will make the proper arrangements to meet the contingencies of to-morrow.

By command of Major-General Warren:

[FRED. T. LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.]

P. S.-Arrangements have been made for General Bartlett’s (First Division) line to go forward if circumstances will permit; it is so understood with him; nothing more definite could be arranged.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 29, 1864-10 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have seen General Burnside and my division commanders. My arrangements for to-morrow were easy to make and are all completed. I have no doubt we shall be on time as expected. I will send you my circular order by a messenger.

G. K. WARREN,
Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-4.10 a. m.

Major-General MEADE:

GENERAL: All my arrangements have been made, and everything has been in position since 3.30.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

General Burnside is directed if his mine has failed to open all his batteries and assault. Upon hearing his batteries open you will open all in your front.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,
Major-General and Chief of Staff.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-5.30 a. m.

Major-General WARREN:

GENERAL: General Crawford reports things in his front about as usual; but very little firing and not much show of men.

FRED. T. LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 30, 1864-5.50 a. m.

Major-General WARREN:

General Burnside is occupying the crater with some of his troops. He reports no enemy is seen in that line. How is it in your front? Are the enemy in force there or weak? If there is apparently an opportunity to carry their works take advantage of it and push forward your troops.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,
Major-General and Chief of Staff.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-6 a. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Your dispatch just received. It is difficult to say how strong the enemy may be in my front. His batteries extend along the whole of it. I will watch for the first opportunity. I can see the whole line well where I am. The enemy has been running from the first line in front of General Burnside’s right for some minutes; but there seems to be a very heavy line of troops just behind it in very high breast-works. There is a battery in front of General Burnside’s left, which fires toward the river the same as it did on the 18th of June, and which our artillery fire has but very little effect on.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,* July 30, 1864-6.15 a. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have just received a report from my line on the center and left. The enemy opened with musketry when our firing began, but our own fire kept it down; also that of all their artillery, except in the second line on the main ridge, from which they fire a little. Major Fitzhugh, of the artillery, is badly wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh. None of the enemy have left my front that I can see.

G. K. WARREN,
Major-General.

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*For copy of this dispatch as submitted with the report of the Court of Inquiry on the Mine explosion, see p. 149.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-6.20 a. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

What we thought was the heavy line of the enemy behind the line occupied by General Burnside’s troops proves as the sunlight comes out and the smoke clears away, to be our own troops in the enemy’s position.

Respectfully,
G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-6.30 a. m.

Major-General WARREN:

The signal officer reports that none of the enemy’s troops are visible in their works near the lead-works. The commanding general wishes if it is practicable that you make an attack in that direction. Prisoners say there are but three divisions in the works, and but one line of intrenchments, thinly filled with their troops. A dispatch just going to Wilson to make a lodgment on the Weldon railroad, and move up it to the enemy’s right flank.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-6.40 a. m.

General CRAWFORD:

General Burnside has secured a lodgment in the enemy’s lines. I send you a dispatch just received. I wish you would take Baxter’s brigade and half of Lyle’s and make the demonstration indicated in the dispatch, if practicable.

G. K. WARREN,
Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-6.40 a. m.

General HUMPHREYS:

I have all my troops on my right except General Crawford’s. I have sent him your dispatch, with directions to do whatever he can on the left with Baxter’s brigade and half of Lyle’s. Do you mean for me to move Ayres in that direction? The enemy have a 30-pounder battery on the main ridge in my front behind their first line. We cannot make out what this second line is.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, July 30, 1864-7.30 a. m.

Major-General WARREN:

Your dispatch respecting attacking the enemy’s right received. The commanding general will await General Crawford’s reconnaissance before determining whether you should send Ayres also in that direction.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,
July 30, 1864-7.50 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have just returned from the scene of General Burnside’s operations. In my opinion the battery of one or two guns to the left of General Burnside should be taken before attempting to seize the crest. It seems to me it can be done, as we shall take the infantry fire obliquely. This done the advance on the main hill will not be difficult. I think it would pay you to go to General Burnside’s position. You can see in a moment, and it is as easy to communicate with me as by telegraph. It will be some time before I hear from Crawford.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,*

July 30, 1864-8 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I sent your dispatch to General Crawford with directions to do what he could. He says “the lead-works are over a mile from the angle of my picket-line. I do not think an attack upon the enemy’s works at or near that point at all practicable with the force I can spare. I can make a demonstration if it is desired. The cavalry are moving and I will have my left uncovered.” He sends word he will await further orders. He is so far off that I do not think it well to wait for anything now that he can do, and I renew my suggestion that you take a look at things from General Burnside’s headquarters, and direct me either to go in with Burnside or go around to my left with Ayres’ division and do the other thing.

G. K. WARREN,
Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 30, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

Your dispatch is received. The major-general commanding directs that you go in with Burnside, taking the two-gun battery. The movement on the left need not be carried further than a reconnaissance to see in what force the enemy is holding his right. The cavalry are ordered to move up on your left, and keep up connection.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.
HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,
July 30, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

The attack ordered on the two-gun battery is suspended.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

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* For copy of this dispatch as submitted with the report of the Court of Inquiry on the Mine explosion, see p.151.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,
July 30, 1864-9.15 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Just before receiving your dispatch to assault the battery on the left on the crater occupied by General Burnside, the enemy drove his troops out of the place and I think now hold it. I can find no one who knows for certainty or seems willing to admit it, but I thing I saw a rebel battle-flag in it just now, and shots coming from it this way. I am, therefore, if this is true, no more able to take the battery than I was this time yesterday. All our advantages are lost. I await further instructions and am trying to get at the condition of affairs for certainty.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.
HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,
July 30, 1864-9.40 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

GENERAL: I find that the flag I saw was the enemy’s, and that they have reoccupied all the line we drove them from except a little around the crater, which a small force of ours still holds.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 30, 1864

General WARREN:

A dispatch has been sent to your headquarters rescinding orders to attack. All offensive operations are suspended. You can resume your original position with your command.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 30, 1864-2.40 p.m.

Major-Generals WARREN, HANCOCK, BURNSIDE, and ORD:

The commanding general desires that you will send in at the curliest moment a statement showing the casualties in your corps in the operations of to-day.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

XLPart1Pg452Table1

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XLPart1Pg453Table1

Besides the working details above recorded, the whole of the Third Division was engaged at work on the redoubts on the plank road and in slashing timber around them and connecting them by breast-works. Besides these was the labor of constructing the large advanced redan on the east of the plank road, and all the main line of intrenchments occupied by our line of battle, 2,300 yards long. Much of this latter was constructed twice, owing to the advancement of the line, and bomb-proof shelters were prepared in it.

ADDENDA.

Journal of Major General Gouverneur K. Warren, U. S. Army, commanding Fifth Army Corps, June 13-July_18.

Monday, June 13.-Our cavalry drove back the enemy’s to New Market Cross-Roads. Crawford’s division went to White Oak Swamp bridge to cover passage of trains and Second Corps. At 8 a.m. began to withdraw, bothered by McIntosh’s cavalry brigade, and only got as far as Saint Mary’s Church, though traveling nearly all night. Enemy did not follow.

Tuesday, June 14.-Marched to Saint Charles [Charles City] Court-House. Took up position, built bridges, &c. Hancock ferrying across Chickahominy; too wide for wagon-train bridge. Lost a day by it.

Wednesday, June 15.-We lay all day in camp. Pontoon bridge built last night across the James River.

Thursday, June 16.-Commenced moving at 2 a.m. All the corps ferried over at 1 p.m. Artillery and wagons all crossed on the pontoon bridge. Went on board Atlanta. Command marched toward Petersburg. Marched nearly all night and reached there before morning. Report this day was that Smith was in Petersburg.

Friday, June 17.-Burnside carried part of enemy’s line at daybreak, skirmishing and fighting all day. Crawford’s division went in at sunset and captured a regiment.

Saturday, June 18.-Advance at 4 a.m. Found the enemy. Retired about 2 p.m. Drove him into his new line covering Petersburg, and had several assaults, which were repulsed. Our loss about 2,000.

Sunday, June 19.-Remained in position. Lost about 300.

Monday, June 20.-Preparations made to extend our line to the left. Withdrew General Griffin from the center in the night.

Tuesday, June 21.- General Griffin extended our line to the plank road. Second Corps marched across it.

Wednesday, June 22.-Second Corps had a bad fight. Got flanked and lost 2,300 prisoners and 4 cannon.

Thursday, June 23.-Enemy retired from his position on left of Second Corps. Sixth Corps took up position and lost some 600 prisoners.

Friday, June 24.-Remained in same general position. Crawford in morning shifted over to the left of the corps and relieved Gibbon.

Sunday, June 26.-Army nearly quiet with continued firing along [lines] night and day.

Monday, June 27.-Reconnoitered my lines again; satisfied I could not improve them.

Thursday, June 30.-Wilson attacked at Reams’ Station. Sixth Corps sent.*

Friday, July 1.-Order received to strengthen lines with abatis. Had already been done.

Saturday, July 2.-Warm and dry. Orders received to report every morning and evening at 9 o’clock.

Sunday, July 3.-Warm and dry. Received notification from General Meade that my opinion was wanted on the possibility of an assault. Reported against its advisability after careful examination.

Monday, July 4.-Warm and dry. General Hunt and Major Duane out examining plans for guns, &c., to assist an assault if General Burnside succeeded. Requested to have them report on operations in my front. General Meade objected to commencing redoubt on my left; however, marked it out after dark by rifle-pits.

Tuesday, July 5.-Very quiet day. Commenced plans for redoubts on left, Captain Mendell and myself locating them by order. Camps unchanged since June 25. General Crawford and General Griffin ordered to furnish large details for work at 3.30 a.m. to-morrow.

Wednesday, July 6.-Major Roebling continued work last night on small redoubt. Working details on the other redoubts worked all day.

Thursday, July 7.-Asked for detail from Second or Sixth Corps to assist me on redoubts.

Friday, July 8.-Work continued on the redoubts, 2,000 men of the Second Corps assisting.

Saturday, July 9.-Quiet all day; working continued. Sixth Corps moved to City Point after dark.

Sunday, July 10.-Quiet all day; continued working on redoubts. General Crawford extended his line about 400 yards to relieve a portion of General Hancock’s.

Monday, July 11.-Troops held in readiness to move at moment’s notice (all).

Tuesday, July 12.-Second Corps was relieved last night from their line and massed. Occupied the two redoubts, large one very incomplete. I spent the day trying to arrange matters, cutting timber, &c.

Wednesday, July 13.-Spent all day superintending work on large redoubt (Fort Davis). Had Hayes’ and Carle’s brigades slashing timber all day. Put battery in each redoubt. Second Corps moved from my left to my rear in the morning. Smyth’s brigade left on picket. General Gregg and General Ferrero reported to me.

Thursday, July 14.-Spent day till 2 p.m. in office, the rest till dark establishing picket-line and giving directions about my lines.

Friday, July 15.-Not very well. Spent the morning at headquarters. General Meade called. Went out on line after 4 p.m.

Saturday, July 16.-Spent morning hard at work in office. Went out on line in afternoon, staid till dark.

Sunday, July 17.-Laid out rifle-pits in the morning; superintended work on large redoubt in afternoon. Had attack threatened at dark and made all needful preparations.

Monday, July 18.-Visited line with General Humphreys. Gave usual amount of directions.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 443-455

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