Number 54. Petersburg Campaign Reports of Captain James H. Hamlin, One Hundred and Forty-Fifth Pennsylvania Infantry

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 80)

No. 54. Reports of Captain James H. Hamlin, One hundred and forty-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry.1

HEADQUARTERS 145TH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS, August 10, 1864.

SIR: *

FIFTH EPOCH.

Left Cold Harbor on evening of the 12th [June], traveled all night and crossed the Chickahominy the 13th, and camped on banks of the James

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* For portion of report (here omitted) covering operations from May 3 to June 12, 1864, see Vol. XXXVI, Part I, p.426.

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River until the evening of the 14th; crossed on Government boat and camped until about noon the 15th. Marched and arrived in front of Petersburg morning of the 16th, and in the evening took part in the assault of the enemy’s works and lost heavily in killed, wounded, and missing.

During the 17th were on support, and on 18th again took the front line and held it until we were relieved the evening of the 20th and moved off to the left.

On the 22nd lost a number in wounded and missing, and were in the advance line until July 12. Went out to support cavalry on the Jerusalem plank road, and on the 13th camped in rear of Fifth Corps, and were on fatigue a number of times until the 26th. Crossed the Appomattox and James River, and were on the support during the 27th, 28th, and 29th, and marched back the night of the 29th and arrived in front of Petersburg morning of the 30th, and were on the reserve during the day, and in the evening ordered back to camp, where we still remain with 6 officers and about 100 men for duty, while on May 3 we numbered 24 officers and 450 men.

Respectfully, yours, &c.,

JAS. H. HAMLIN,

Captain, Commanding Regiment.

ACTG. ASST. ADJT. General, FOURTH BRIGADE.
HEADQUARTERS 145TH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS, September 28, 1864.

ADJUTANT: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of the regiment under my command during the engagement of the Second Corps, at Deep Bottom, from the 26th to the 30th of July, inclusive:

About noon of the 26th I received orders though brigade headquarters to have my command in readiness to move at 3.30 p. m. At the time designated the regiment formed in line with the division, moved on the City Point [road] some distance, then bore off to the left and crossed the Appomattox River, and camped about 3 a. m. of the 27th on the north bank. At daylight, with the brigade, formed line of battle and advanced, supporting the skirmish line during the day. In the evening two commissioned officers, with most of the regiment, went on picket. The remainder of the men were then moved back to protect the flank, and bivouacked for the night.

On the 28th were on support until evening, when we moved to the left and threw up a line of works during the night. On the 29th completed the works begun, arranged and cleared up camp during the day, and at 8 p. m. received orders to pack up, and a few moments after moved. Marched very hard during the remainder of the night, many of the troops giving out by the way, and arrived in front of Petersburg between daybreak and sunrise of the 30th, and lay on support of the lines, which were heavily engaged with the enemy. Here we remained during the day under cover of a hill, where it was very hot and unpleasant, until dark; wee ordered back to the camp left on the 26th – all without the loss of a man.

JAS. H. HAMLIN,
Captain, Commanding.

[ACTG. ASST. ADJT. General, FOURTH BRIGADE.]

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pages 361-362

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