OR XL P1 #6: Itinerary of the Army of the Potomac and Army of the James June 12-July 31

   

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in Part 1 (Serial Number 80)

No. 6. Itinerary of the Army of the Potomac and Army of the James, &c.* 1

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

SECOND ARMY CORPS.#

June 12 and 13. – Moved by Long Bridge, on the Chickahominy, to Charles City Court-House.

June 14 to 15. – Crossed James River by boat at Wilcox’s Landing.

June 15. – Moved to Petersburg.

June 16. – Assault on the enemy’s position near the Friend house, gaining ground and carrying rifle-pits.

June 17. – Major-General Hancock relinquished command to Major-General Birney.

June 18. – Enemy withdrew to another position. At 12 m. unsuccessful attack on enemy’s position . At 4.30 p.m. second attack unsuccessful.

June 21. – Moved to the left, crossing Jerusalem plank road to William’s house; took position on the left; First Division skirmishing with the enemy and capturing prisoners.

June 22. – Unsuccessful attempt to advance the line on the left; loss of prisoners and 4 guns.

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*From returns of the commands indicated for June and July, 1864.

#Commanded by Major General Winfield S. Hancock.

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June 27. – Major General Hancock resumes command.

June 30. – In position before Petersburg, Va.

July 1. – In position on the line in front of Petersburg.

July 12. – Destroyed the corps line of intrenchments and massed at Williams’ house.

July 13. – Moved to vicinity of Deserted House, going in reserve.

July 15. – Second Division placed on left of the line.

July 26. – Moved across Appomattox and James Rivers to Strawberry Plains.

July 27. – Engaged with the enemy, capturing prisoners.

July 28. – Third Division moved back to vicinity of Petersburg.

July 29 and 30. – Returned to vicinity of Petersburg and massed in rear of Ninth Corps. In reserve during the action of the 30th; in the evening returned to vicinity of Deserted House.

First Division.

June 13. – Crossed at Long Bridge and marched to Wilcox’s Wharf, on James River.

June 14. – Crossed the James River in transports.

June 15. – Marched to present position, near Petersburg.

June 16. – Assaulted the enemy’s works.

June 17. – Assisted General Burnside’s corps in capture of redoubts.

June 18. – Assaulted.

June 21. – Marched to the left, near Williams’ house; advanced to within one mile and quarter of Weldon railroad, but were recalled.

June 22. – Advanced, but were obliged to return to first position to prevent being outflanked.

July 2. – Moved to Williams’ house, destroying the intrenchments previously held by the division. At 6 p.m. of the same day moved to the junction of the Jerusalem plank and Reams’ Station roads, returning to Williams’ house at 11 p.m.

July 13. – Moved to position in rear of Fifth Corps.

July 26. – Moved across Appomattox and James Rivers.

July 27. -First Brigade advanced and took the position occupied by the enemy, capturing four 20-pounder Parrott guns.

July 29. – Recrossed the James and Appomattox Rivers.

July 30. – Moved in rear of the Eighteenth Corps. At 8 p.m. returned to former position in rear of the Fifth Corps.

First Brigade, First Division.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy at 9 a.m. at Long Bridge; marched in the direction toward Charles City; arrived on the banks of the James at Swynyard’s Landing at 4 p.m. and bivouacked for the night.

June 14. – Remained in camp until 11.45 p.m. ; moved to the landing.

June 15. – At 2.30 a.m. we embarked; crossed the James and landed at Wind-Mill Point. At 6 a.m. marched about one mile from the landing and bivouacked in an open field all forenoon. At 1.20 we moved, and arrived within three miles of Petersburg at 11.30 p.m.

June 16. – At 3 p.m. moved to within sight of Petersburg, and from thence moved to the left about two miles. At 5.30 a.m. formed the second line for a charge on the enemy’s works.

June 17. – At 4 a.m. charged the enemy’s works in conjunction with Burnside.

June 18. – At 6 a.m. moved forward and occupied the enemy’s works the enemy having fallen back during the night. At 12 m. we marched to near the railroad, in rear of Petersburg, and took up a position on a crest commanding the railroad.

June 20. -At 10 p.m. we were relieved by a portion of Burnside’s troops and moved about one mile to the rear.

June 21. – At 6 a.m. we moved to the left; marched until 2 p.m., and arrived near the Weldon railroad.

June 22. – At 4 p.m. resisted a determined assault of A. P. Hill’s corps on our breast-works and captured 40 prisoners.

June 23. – Moved to the left in front and relieved a brigade of the Sixth Corps.

June 24. – At 6. 30 p.m. marched back to our old position behind the breast-works, and remained in the second line the rest of the month.

July 10. – At 1 a.m. we moved from our position about two miles to our left and relieved the Sixth Corps picket, and remained on picket until 2 p.m. the 12th.

July 12. – At 5 p.m. we moved out on the Jerusalem plank road, and at 11 p.m. we were ordered back to our old position at Williams’ house.

July 13. – At 5.30 a.m. we marched to the right and arrived opposite Petersburg at 10.30 a.m.

July 14. – The whole brigade worked on the trenches.

July 20 to 25. – Worked on the trenches.

July 26. – At 5 p.m. we moved toward the Appomattox. At 11.30 p.m. we crossed.

July 27. – At 1 a.m. crossed the James. Marched a short distance and bivouacked in an open field. At 6 a.m. we threw out skirmishers. At 7 a.m. charged the enemy and captured four 20-pounder Parrott guns and about 20 prisoners. At 11 a.m. we advanced our skirmish line about one mile through the woods.

July 28. – At 6 p.m. we went back about one mile to the edge in the open field, where we charged the battery on the 27th.

July 29. – At 8.30 p.m. we moved back across the James and Appomattox, arriving opposite Petersburg at 5 a.m. of the 30th.

July 30. – Remained all day in supporting distance of the Ninth Army Corps. About 6 p.m. we moved back in the same camp which we occupied before the march across the James.

Consolidated Second Brigade, First Division.

June 14. – Reached the James River at 4 p.m. Threw up breastworks.

June 15. – Crossed the river. Marched all day.

June 16. – Reached a point at 3 a.m. about five miles south of Petersburg. Remained in line until 4 p.m. when the command took part in the charge made by the corps. At midnight made another charge and carried the enemy’s works and 4 guns.

June 19. – Moved to the left.

June 22. – Took part in the severe engagement of the corps on the left of the line. Remained in the vicinity building works and strengthening position.

No further movement up to June 30.

July 26. -At 4 p.m. this command marched from camp, in front of Petersburg, Va., in the direction of the Appomattox. Crossed in rear of Butler’s line at 8 p.m. Marched all night.

July 27. – Crossed the James River at Deep Bottom at daylight. Formed line of battle and took part in the capture of the enemy’s works and 4 guns. Remained at Deep Bottom until the evening of the 30th [29th]; again recrossed the James River. Marched all night and reached a point in rear of the Eighteenth Army Corps. Formed line and remained on reserve during the action of the Ninth Corps of that day [30th], returned to this camp at 8 p.m.

Fourth Brigade, First Division.

June 13. – Crossed the river at noon, and reached the bank of the James opposite Wind-Mill Point at 5 p.m.

June 14. – Crossed at 9 p.m.; moved a few miles up the river and rested for the night.

June 15. – Marched at noon.

June 16. – At 3 a.m. reached a point within a few miles of the defenses of Petersburg. After a few hours’ rest the command advanced and took position on the left of the line. At 6.30 an attack was made on a rebel fort in the left and front, which was not successful. The brigade lost heavily in officers and men. Colonel Beaver, commanding, was wounded severely while at the left of the line directing the advance. After the repulse the brigade fell back to the breast-works.

June 17. – Supported a part of the Ninth Corps in a charge on the enemy’s works farther to the right.

June 18. – Advanced half a mile and intrenched.

June 20. – Being relieved by other troops, the brigade withdrew from the line; passed the night near its first position.

June 21. – Marched in the direction of the Weldon railroad. Before taking up a line some sharp skirmishing occurred; breast-works were thrown up and occupied.

June 22. – The lines were advanced some distance, but failed to hold the position, the enemy penetrating to the rear of the line, and the brigade fell back to the rifle-pits, where it remained to the close of the month.

July 12. – The command moved from its old position toward the Williams house, where it laid in line until dark, when it took up a line of march south on the Jerusalem plank road to support Gregg’s division of cavalry, returning, at midnight to the Williams house.

July 13. – At daylight the brigade proceeded on the road toward the James River, halting about noon in front of Petersburg, where the command halted and remained until the afternoon of the 26th.

July 26. – Took up the line of march; crossed the James River at Deep Bottom to support a cavalry force.

July 30. – Not being engaged with the enemy, it returned to the old place of encampment in the evening, losing only 1 man wounded.

Second Division, commanded by Major General John Gibbon.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy and bivouacked near Charles City Court-House.

June 14. – Crossed James River and reached fortifications in front of Petersburg on the 15th instant, relieving a portion of the Eighteenth Army Corps. Participated in the several engagements with the enemy in front of Petersburg to the 30th instant.

During the month ending July 31 this command occupied a position on the left flank of the army in front of Petersburg until the evening

of the 26th, when, with the corps, it moved to the extreme right of the army, crossing the James River and participating in the skirmishes occurring in that vicinity.

July 29. – Recrossed the James River; marched until daylight of the 30th, when it was assigned position in rear of the Eighteenth Army Corps. On the evening of that day it returned to its former position on the left.

Third Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel Thomas A. Smyth, First Delaware Infantry.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy and bivouacked near Charles City Court-House until the next day.

June 14. – Crossed James River.

June 15. – Marched to and reached fortifications around Petersburg, relieving a portion of the Eighteenth Army Corps. Participated in the engagements before Petersburg with the division until the close of the month.

During the month [of July] this brigade occupied a position upon the left flank of the army in front of Petersburg until the evening of the 26th, when, with the corps, it broke camp and took up the line of march to the James River.

July 27.- Arrived at Jones’ Neck at early dawn; crossed the river; participated in the skirmishers occurring there.

July 29. -Recrossed the river at dusk; marched all night, reaching Petersburg at daylight of the 30th.

July 30. – Massed in rear of the Eighteenth Corps, ready, if necessary, to render its services in the engagement of that day, but were not called upon. At night the brigade again returned to its former position on the left.

Third Division.

June 13. – Crossed the railroad at Dispatch Station at 5 a.m. and the river at Long Bridge, resting at Wilcox’s Landing, on the James River, at 6 p.m.; threw up earth-works.

June 14. – Moved at 10 a.m. to the river and commenced crossing to Wind-Mill Point, which was accomplished by 4.30 p.m. and the troops massed near the Wilcox house.

June 15. – Two regiments moved at 7 a.m. as far as Cocke’s Mill (or Powell’s Creek), where they awaited the remainder of the division, which arrived about 11 a.m. During the remainder of the day the march was steady and severe, and the head of the column arrived near the ground where General Smith was engaged at 6. 15 p.m. and at midnight the whole command was in position in front of the works which the enemy had evacuated.

June 16. – Attacked at 6 a.m. with one brigade; at 6 p.m. with the division and intrenched on the advanced position gained.

June 17. – Major-General Birney was placed in command of the corps, and Brigadier-General Mott in command of division.

June 18. – Advanced at daylight crossing two lines of the enemy’s works, and coming upon them strongly intrenched near the New Market race-course; intrenched. At 4.30 p.m. the First and Second Brigades, commanded by Colonel Madill, One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Colonel Chaplin, First Maine Heavy Artillery, respectively, charged the enemy’s works and were repulsed with great

loss. The Third and Fourth Brigades reported to General Gibbon in the morning, and participated in an attack made by his division (Second) about noon.

June 20. – Relieved at midnight by Ninth Army Corps; moved to left and rear about one mile and massed.

June 21. – Marched at 8 a.m. crossing the Norfolk railroad and taking position on the west of the Jerusalem plank road.

June 22. – Advanced to take new line, which we were intrenching, when, at 4 p.m., the enemy turned the flank of the division on our left, which caused us to fall back to the point occupied in the morning.

June 23. – Advanced at 9 a.m. and found the enemy had retired. Retained this position without change of importance until the 30th instant.

July 1 to 11. – Division occupied the breast-works, right connecting with the Fifth Corps, with no firing of importance by us or from the enemy.

July 12. – Division, except the picket-line, withdrawn from the intrenchments at about 3 a.m. by way of the Jones house and plank road, massing about one mile to the left and rear, near the Williams house.

July 13. – Moved to the right about three miles and encamped in rear of the Fifth Corps; remained in camp performing fatigue duty until the 26th.

July 26. – At 5 p.m. broke camp and marched, crossing the James River, via Point of Rocks and Jones’ Landing.

July 27. – Arrived at Deep Bottom at daylight and attacked the enemy.

July 28. – Recrossed the James River at 9 p.m.

July 29. – Relieved the Eighteenth Corps in the trenches.

July 30. – At dark returned to our former camps in rear of the Fifth Corps.

First Brigade, Third Division.

June 12. – Accompanied the army on the march toward Petersburg.

June 14. – Crossed the James River.

June 16. – Participated in a severe conflict with the enemy, in which it was successful, our troops behaving nobly, since with time we have occupied the front line of the works, holding the center of the division.

Nothing of interest occurred up to July 26, when the brigade broke camp and marched toward the James River, crossing the Appomattox about 11 p.m.

July 27. – Arrived at the James River, near Deep Bottom, at daylight. We immediately crossed the James River and attacked the enemy; had a brisk skirmish, in which the brigade lost 4 officers and 44 men.

July 28. – Recrossed the James at night and marched until daylight.

July 29. – At dark we relieved General Turner’s division, of the Eighteenth Corps, in the trenches.

July 30. – We were relieved at night, and returned to our present camp.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

June 12. – We received marching orders and the same night the brigade started with the rest of the division for James River.

June 13. – Arrived at the river at night.

June 14. – Crossed to the south side of the James River. The Fourth Maine, whose term of service expired on the 13th, was relieved by Special Orders, No.-,dated headquarters Second Army Corps, June 14, 1864. No records were left showing the number discharged, but those who were not sent to Maine for that purpose were transferred to the Nineteenth Maine, Second Division, Second Army Corps. The loss by expiration of term of service and transfer amounted to 474. The same day the brigade marched for Petersburg, where it arrived the same night.

June 16. – In the afternoon a charge was made upon the enemy’s works, which resulted in our driving their front line and securing a position near their works. Colonel Thomas R. Tannatt, commanding brigade, was wounded. Loss in the brigade was 274. Colonel R. McAllister, Eleventh New Jersey Volunteers, was assigned to the command of the brigade.

June 18. – The brigade made another charge at 4 a.m. driving the enemy through the woods toward Petersburg and gaining a position on the plank road leading to that place. Here the brigade was temporarily assigned to the command of Brigadier General B. R. Pierce during the operations of to-day. At noon another charge was made with the intention of taking the enemy’s earth-works in our front, which were about 350 or 400 yards distant. The charge in this respect was unsuccessful, owing to the murderous fire of musketry, grape, and canister sweeping through the open field in our front. But the brigade gained two points 100 yards in advance and on the right and left of our line, respectively, where rifle-pits were immediately constructed, which enabled us to throw up strong earth-works in that position afterward.

June 20. – The brigade was relieved from this position at night.

June 21. – The brigade with the rest of the division and corps, marched farther to the left, taking up a new position on the left of the Fifth Corps, an advanced position. The division on our left was forced back by the enemy, which necessitated our falling back to the first line of earth-works, with a loss of killed, wounded, and missing. In the evening the brigade was ordered to charge across an open field in our front, a distance of 250 yards, to a piece of woods, which was very successful.

June 25. – Brigadier General B. R. Pierce was assigned to the command of this brigade.

July 1. – Brigade encamped in line of earth-works near Petersburg, where we remained until the 12th.

July 12. – We leveled the works in our front and withdrew from that portion of the line. The brigade then moved to the rear and established camps, remaining in that position until the 23d.

July 23. -Orders came for us to occupy the earth-works on the left of the line, encamping in the rear of a redoubt at that point.

July 26. – The brigade, together with the rest of the division, went on a reconnaissance to the north side of the James River toward Richmond. Brigadier General B. R. Pierce then commanding the brigade, who had been ill for several days, was sent to the hospital at City Point, which left Colonel Daniel Chaplin, First Maine Heavy Artillery, in command; we marched all night.

July 27.- At daybreak crossed the James River. After a short rest we were moved into position, and an action was commenced with the enemy without, apparently, the least exertion on our part. As we advanced the enemy retreated as they usually do when this division advances. Skirmishing was kept up all day with a view to developing their position and strength.

July 28.- Our position was changed somewhat, and we intrenched preparatory to an attack of the enemy; but as they concluded that discretion is the better part of valor, they did that valiant deed and left us alone. On this date the First Maine Heavy Artillery was temporarily transferred to the First Brigade, and the One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers transferred to this brigade, Colonel H. J. Madill, of the One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania, assuming command of the brigade. At night we were ordered back to the south side of the James River, which order was executed, getting into position at daybreak.

July 29. – In the evening we marched to the front lines and relieved a part of the Eighteenth Corps in the trenches.

During the engagement of the 30th we had sharp skirmishing with the enemy, in which our loss was 1 killed and 4 wounded. The same evening we were relieved by the Eighteenth Corps and returned to our former camp, that we occupied on the 26th, arriving there on the morning of the 31st, where we remain at the present time.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

June 13. – At 10.30 a.m. crossed the Chickahominy River at Long

Bridge and marched in the direction of James River.

June 14. – At 10 a.m. marched to the banks of the river. At 2 p.m. commenced crossing in transports from Wilcox’s Wharf. At 6.30 p.m. the command had crossed the river and halted at a point two miles distant from Wind-Mill Point.

June 15. – Marched in the direction of Petersburg, arriving in front of that place about 10 p.m.

June 16. – Went into position in front of the enemy’s works and intrenched. At 4 p.m. advanced on the enemy along the Petersburg road. At 9 p.m. intrenched the position gained during the advance.

June 18. – At 4 a.m. advanced upon the enemy and took possession of another line of rifle-pits. At 4 p.m. the brigade made an assault on the enemy’s works in front of Hare’s house with heavy loss.

June 20. – Moved to the left and rear about one mile and massed.

June 21. – At 10 a.m. marched three miles to the left, crossing the Petersburg and Suffolk Railroad; went into position and threw up a line of works to the left of Second Division of this corps; advanced skirmishers and discovered the enemy’s works in our front.

June 22. – Moved to an advanced position in front of the works we had occupied and commenced to intrench. About 4 p.m. the enemy made an attack upon the troops of the First Division of this corps, which occupied a position in our immediate left,causing them to fall back in confusion. The enemy then advanced upon our rear and flank and the brigade fell back to the position occupied yesterday. Remained in this position until the present date [June 30.].

July 1 to 12. – Remained in camp in front of Petersburg.

July 12. – Moved to the left one mile and massed on the Jerusalem plank road near the Williams house.

July 13. – Moved to the right about two miles, and went into camp in rear of the Dunn house.

July 26. – Marched at 4 p.m., crossing the Appomattox River at 10.30 p.m., arriving at the banks of the James River at Deep Bottom about daylight, and went into position near the point of crossing.

July 28. – Recrossed the river at 9 p.m.; marched until 3.30 a.m. of the 29th, and massed the brigade near the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps.

July 29. – Marched at dark and occupied the works in front of the enemy vacated by the Eighteenth Army Corps.

July 30. – At 9 p.m. was relieved by the troops of the Eighteenth Army Corps and marched to our present position.

Artillery Brigade, commanded by Major John G. Hazard, First Rhode Island Light Artillery.

June 13. – Arrived at the James River.

June 15. – Six batteries moved with the corps, arriving at Petersburg.

June 16. – Engaged; the remaining batteries arrived at 4 p.m.; also engaged. Engaged till June 23 more or less in the numerous assaults on the works around Petersburg.

Quiet the remainder of the month; now near the Jerusalem plank road, three miles from Petersburg.*

Moved from the neighborhood of the Jerusalem plank road to the Deserted House; in camp until the 26th.

July 26. – Moved across the James River to Deep Bottom.

July 27. – Four batteries engaged.

July 29. – Recrossed the James River.

July 30. – Lay in reserve during the assault.

July 31. – Returned to former camp near the Norfolk road.

FIFTH ARMY CORPS.#

June 13. – Moved out to White Oak Swamp, and skirmished with enemy. At 7 p.m. set out for Charles City Court-House; marched all night.

June 14. – Reached Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Crossed James River at Wind-Mill Point, and marched until after midnight, arriving at Petersburg.

June 17. – Part of corps engaged in supporting Ninth Corps.

June 18. – Advanced against enemy; drove him to his intrenchments and made heavy assault at 3 or 4 p.m.; took up position close to enemy’s lines. Remained in this position skirmishing with the enemy daily during rest of the month.

During the past month [July] the corps has been in position in front of Petersburg, Va. It has been constantly engaged in constructing works for the purpose of advancing the siege, and in holding the left flank of this army.

July 30. – The artillery and a portion of the corps were engaged with the enemy during the assault upon his works by the Ninth Corps.

First Division, commanded by Brigadier General Charles Griffin.

June 13. – In the morning crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge, and resumed the march for Charles City Court-House the same evening.

June 14. – Reached the James River.

June 16. – Crossed the James River near Wilcox’s Landing; resumed the march for Petersburg, going into position near that place the same evening.

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*End of the June record.

#Commanded by Major General Gouverneur K. Warren.

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The division participated in the assault made on the interior line on the 18th instant. From that time up to the present date [June 30] the command has remained in front of the enemy at this place.

[July 31.] – Since June 30 the division has remained in front of Petersburg, performing picket duty and constructing earth-works and batteries.

First Brigade, First Division, commanded by Colonel William S. Tilton, Twenty-second Massachusetts Infantry.

June 13. – It crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge, and halted for the day on the south side of the river; at night-fall it again moved forward.

June 14. – Encamped in the afternoon near Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Crossed the James River in the morning on transports at Wilcox’s Landing, and marched in the direction of Petersburg.

The brigade participated in the assault made on the interior line of the enemy’s works on the 18th instant. From that time to the present date [June 30] the command has remained in the front line of earth-works. No enlisted men have been transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps during the month.

[July 31] The brigade still occupies the position it held at date of last monthly return, and the troops of the command have been engaged in doing picket duty and building breast-works and batteries.

Third Brigade, First Division, commanded by Brigadier General Joseph J. Bartlett.

July 1 to 31. – In the trenches before Petersburg, Va.

Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General Romeyn B. Ayres.

Two brigades (Second and Third) occupied the trenches in front of Petersburg, Va., until the 27th and 28th [July], when they were relieved by the First Division, the First Brigade being already in reserve.

July 30. – The division was marched to the support of the Ninth Corps,and held in reserve during the assault upon the enemy’s line.

Second Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel Nathan T. Dushane, First Maryland Infantry.

June 13. – Crossed the [Chickahominy] River at 4 a.m., and moved in a westerly direction about two miles.

June 14.- Brigade marched to Charles City Court-House, at which place we remained during the 15th.

June 16. – At 11 a.m. brigade crossed James River on board transports, and extended our march in direction of Petersburg.

June 17. – The brigade moved up to the trenches.

June 18. – At 3 a.m. the brigade was ordered to support General Cutler, occupying the extreme left of the army; were ordered by General Cutler to form in line of battle, throwing out skirmishers,and advanced on the line to find the enemy; pressed forward and found him. We sustained a loss of 6 killed and 19 wounded. At 2 p.m. we joined our division,and took position on the south side of the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad. Remained in camp until 5 p.m. of the 22d, when

the brigade was ordered to report to the Jones house, and from there to General Birney, commanding Second Army Corps, who ordered the brigade to the support of General Barlow; returned to camp during the night.

June 23.- At 5 p.m. the brigade was ordered to report to General Wright, commanding Sixth Army Corps, at Williams’ house; were placed in line on the extreme left of the army, protecting the flank; threw up earth-works. At 12 o’clock, midnight, the brigade was ordered to take position on the left of Williams’ house, where it remained until 5 p.m. of the 24th, when it rejoined division.

June 25. – At 8.30 p.m. the brigade relieved the Third Brigade, which was occupying the trenches in front of the enemy, at which place the brigade remained during the balance of the month. The brigade remained in the trenches until the 28th [July], when it was relieved and moved to the rear, and encamped.

July 30. – It marched to the front, supporting the Ninth Army Corps, which made an assault on the enemy’s works. At 10.30 a.m. brigade returned to camp.

Third Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel J. Howard Kitching, Sixth New York Heavy Artillery.

June 13. – In the morning crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge.

June 16. – Crossed the James River on transports.

June 18. – Advanced on the enemy’s works at 4 p.m.; engaged them and established our line about 350 yards in advance, and encamped in front of Petersburg and commenced building works.

June 30. – Position unchanged.

July 1 to 27.- This command has occupied the rifle-pits in front of Petersburg, Va.

July 27. – Was relieved from the rifle-pits and sent to the rear in reserve.

July 30. – Ordered to the front as a reserve for the Ninth and Eighteenth Corps. At night was again ordered to the rear in reserve.

Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General Samuel W. Crawford.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge at 1 a.m.; halted at daylight in line of battle; advanced about 6 a.m. in support of the cavalry (General Wilson), about three miles, near the Charles City Cross-Roads. At 10 p.m. moved to Saint Mary’s Church and halted for the night.

June 14. – Continued our march at 6 a.m., passing Ladd’s Store and Georgetown; halted at 11 a.m. about one mile from Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Broke camp at daylight; marched three miles to James River; embarked at plantation landing on transports; landed at Wind-Mill Point on the south side of the river; marched to within three miles of Petersburg; halted at 2.30 a.m.

June 17. – At 11 a.m. advanced three-quarters of a mile to the outer works of Petersburg; formed line of battle; at dark advanced in support of First Division, Ninth Army Corps (General Ledlie), Third Brigade in front, the First and Second Brigades in supporting distance; captured the Thirty-ninth North Carolina Regiment, colors and all.

June 18. – Commenced advancing to our left at 4 a.m.; advanced our lines about a mile, crossing the Suffolk railroad; threw up intrench-

ments; remained in line, much annoyed by sharpshooters, until June 24, when we were relieved by General Wilcox’s division, Ninth Army Corps; moved to the left about three miles; relieved General Gibbon’s division, Second Corps.

June 28. – Portion of our line thrown forward, making close connection with the Second Army Corps.

June 30. – In line of battle on the Jerusalem plank road.

July 12. – The division was withdrawn from intrenched line in front, connecting on the right with Griffin’s (First) Division. The First and Second Brigades occupy the large and small redoubts on our left flank, the Third Brigade in reserve; position of picket-line unchanged.

July 13. – Two hundred men of the Second Corps picket, connecting with the left of Third Division picket, relieved by same number from Second Brigade.

July 14. – Relieved all of the Second Corps picket-line from the Jerusalem plank road near Williams’ house, on the left, to the point of woods where the line breaks to the rear on the right by Third Brigade.

First Brigade, Third Division, commanded by Colonel Peter Lyle, Ninetieth Pennsylvania Infantry.

June 13. – Took position near White Oak Swamp bridge; skirmished during the day, and after dark marched to Saint Mary’s Church, bivouacking.

June 14. – Encamped near Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Crossed the James River, and halted three miles from Petersburg.

June 17. – Remained in reserve.

June 18. – Advanced and drove the enemy’s skirmishers across the Norfolk railroad into their works; threw up intrenchments, connecting with the Ninth Corps on the right. Remained in this position until the morning of the 24th, losing many men daily from the close proximity of the enemy’s works.

June 24. – Moved to the left; relieved a portion of the Second Corps, on the Jerusalem plank road, where the brigade remains at this date, June 30.

[July 31.] – Since July 1 no movements or changes of importance have transpired. The command has been engaged in building fortifications. Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps-Sixteenth Maine Volunteers, three men, Ninetieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, four men, One hundred and fourth New York Volunteers, one man. Total, eight enlisted men.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

June 13. – Brigade ordered to relieve the cavalry; Ninety-fourth New York deployed as skirmishers, the enemy opening on them; threw up breast-works and remained in position all day. At dark marched to Saint Mary’s Church.

June 14. – Reached that point at 4 a.m. At 6 a.m. started, reaching Charles City Court-House.

June 15. – Remained in same position.

June 16. – Moved at 3 a.m.; crossed the James River on transports; rested two hours. At 2 p.m. marched on the road leading to Petersburg.

June 17. – Arrived near that city at 8 a.m.; at the outer works of Petersburg in the evening; marched to the left in support of Ninth Corps; returned same night to former position.

June 18. – Marched to left, formed in line of battle, and advanced on the position held by the enemy. At 4 p.m. brigade and one of the First Division pressed forward. On getting out of the woods behind the bank (where the line had been formed) the enemy opened a heavy fire. Losing heavily, and not being supported, the brigade fell back behind the bank, remaining until dark, then retired to the next crest and threw up a line of breast-works, working all night.

June 19. – Lay behind the works all day.

June 20 to 26. – Same position.

June 26. – Moved at 12 p.m. relieving the Third Brigade, taking position in their works on the Jerusalem road.

June 30. – Remained in same position.

July 1. – In intrenchments on Jerusalem plank road; remained until

July 11; moved to the rear one mile, leaving a detachment as picket.

July 17. – Brigade commenced building abatis.

July 18. – Built breast-works on the left, connecting with Second Corps.

July 29. – Received orders at 12 p.m. to prepare for an attack; troops under arms at 3 a.m. [30th]; this brigade not engaged.

Third Brigade, Third Division.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy in the morning with Wilson’s cavalry; engaged the enemy near White Oak Swamp from 2 to 10 p.m., then marched to near Saint Mary’s Church.

June 14. – Arrived at that place in the morning, making a distance from Providence Church of twenty-five miles; marched to Charles City Court-House a distance of five miles.

June 16. – Moved at an early hour; crossed James River at Wind-Mill Point on steamers; marched until the morning of the 17th, a distance of twenty-two miles, and encamped near Petersburg, Va. In the evening had an engagement, and captured a number of prisoners, arms, &c., had daily skirmishes with the enemy until the 22d.

June 23. – Crossed the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad and relieved a brigade of the Second Corps, under a galling fire of artillery and musketry; remained in rifle-pits until the end of the month.

[July 31.]- The entire brigade has been engaged doing picket and fatigue duty daily to the left of the Jerusalem plank road up to the 14th, at which time they relieved a division of the Second Corps, doing picket duty at the extreme left of the line the remainder of the month.

Fourth Division, commanded by Brigadier General Lysander Cutler.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy at 5 a.m. at Long Bridge; marched at 5 p.m. as train guard, and bivouacked about two miles from Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Moved at 4.30 a.m. to cross the James River; embarked at 10.30 o’clock, and landed on south side about three miles above Wind-Mill Point. At 3.10 p.m. moved on Petersburg; bivouacked at house of Mr. Burchett, about two miles beyond Prince George Court-House.

June 17. – At 7 a.m. moved one mile and a half to the front; encountered the enemy, when we intrenched; shelling all day; loss slight.

June 18. – Moved at 4 a.m.; passed the enemy’s outer and second line of works, which the had abandoned during the night. At 3 p.m.

made an unsuccessful charge upon the enemy’s works in front of us; loss very heavy; intrenched at 10 p.m.; have occupied the same ground since; loss each day from sharpshooters has been very heavy.

No movement of the division has been made since last report [for June]. Heavy details have been furnished during the month for fatigue duty, digging trenches, roads, &c.

July 30. – Engaged the enemy with musketry during operations of Ninth and Eighteenth Army Corps, without leaving the trenches.

First Brigade, Fourth Division, commanded by Colonel Edward S. Bragg, Sixth Wisconsin Infantry.

The brigade was engaged in the action of Bethesda Church [May 31], and participated in the skirmishing, marching, and fighting of the corps from that time to the end of the month [June], at which time it is in the works southeast of Petersburg.

June 11.- Those of the Second Wisconsin Volunteers whose term had not expired were transferred to the Independent Battalion Wisconsin Volunteers, and the remainder left for Wisconsin to be discharged the service.

[July.]-Participated in the siege of Petersburg.

Second Brigade, Fourth Division, commanded by Colonel J. William Hofmann, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Infantry.

June 13. – Crossed the Chickahominy at 5 a.m. at Long Bridge; marched at 5 p.m. as train guard, and bivouacked about two miles from Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Moved at 4.30 a.m. to cross the James; embarked at 10.30 o’clock, and landed on south side about three miles above Wind-Mill Point. At 3.10 p.m. moved on Petersburg; bivouacked at house of Mr. Burchett, about two miles beyond Prince George Court-House.

June 17. – At 7 a.m. moved one mile and a half to the front; encountered the enemy, when we intrenched; shelling all day; loss slight.

June 18. – Moved at 4 a.m.; passed the enemy’s outer and second line of works, which they had abandoned during the night. At 3 p.m. made an unsuccessful charge upon the enemy’s works in front of us; loss very heavy; over 300 killed and wounded; about 1,300 engaged; intrenched at 10 p.m; have occupied same ground since; loss each day from sharpshooters has been very heavy, amounting in all to 102 men.

June 28. – Were relieved from line by Bragg’s brigade, and moved into woods in rear of line.

Artillery Brigade, commanded by Colonel Charles S. Wainwright, First New York Light Artillery.

June 13. – Crossed Chickahominy at daylight; marched three miles; left at evening; marched all night, to Charles City Court-House; distance, fifteen miles.

June 14 and 15. – Headquarters at Wilcox’s house.

June 16. – Crossed James River below Wind-Mill Point;marched to near Petersburg; arrived on the morning of the 17th; distance, thirteen miles; three batteries engaged.

June 18.- Fought all day; lines advanced about one mile.

June 19. – Before Petersburg; headquarters at Avery’s house. No general engagement has taken place since this date.

[July] – Nothing of importance transpired prior to the 30th instant, when all the batteries of this command were engaged with those of the enemy.

SIXTH ARMY CORPS.*

June 13. – Crossed Chickahominy at Jones’ Bridge and encamped.

June 14. – Moved to Charles City Court-House.

June 15. – Remained at Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Moved to vicinity of pontoon bridge and intrenched; at night Second Division crossed pontoon bridge and reported to General Meade. The First and Third Divisions embarked on transports for Bermuda Hundred and reported to General Butler.

June 18. – Remained in General Butler’s department.

June 19. – Crossed the Appomattox; joined Army of the Potomac; took position on right of the line.

June 20. – In same position.

June 21. – At night moved to extreme left to line.

June 22. – Moved out about two miles; had slight skirmish.

June 23. – Had another skirmish and fell back afterward to original line.

June 24. – Advanced skirmish line to position of previous day.

June 25 to 28. – In same position.

June 29. – Moved to Reams’ Station.

June 30. – Destroyed three miles of railroad; at night moved back to Tucker house, on Jerusalem plank road.

July 1. – Camp near Warwick Swamp.

July 2. – Returned to original position on left of the line, near Petersburg.

July 6. – Third Division marched at daylight to City Point and embarked for Baltimore.

July 10.- First and Second Divisions embarked at City Point for Washington.

First Brigade, First Division, commanded by Colonel William H. Penrose, Fifteenth New Jersey Infantry.

[June 30.] – The brigade has been engaged in all the battles in which the Sixth Corps participated, from Cold Harbor, Va., to and before Petersburg, Va.

July 9. – The brigade left Petersburg, Va., for Washington, D. C., by transports, and arrived July 11, since which time the brigade has been attached to the Department of West Virginia.

Second Brigade, First Division,commanded by Colonel Emory Upton, One hundred and twenty-first New York Infantry.

June 13. – Crossed Chickahominy at 7 p.m. and encamped; guarded artillery and trains during the march.

June 14. – Resumed the march; at 7 p.m. reached James River near Fort Powhatan.

June 17. – Took transports at Wilson’s Wharf at 1 a.m.; disembarked at Bermuda Hundred at 6 a.m. and marched to Point of Rocks.

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*Commanded by Major General Horatio G. Wright.

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June 19. – Marched at 5 a.m. for Petersburg; relieved Stannard’s brigade at 10 p.m. and constructed rifle-pits along his skirmish line.

June 21.- Relieved by Stannard’s division and marched to left of Second Corps.

June 29. – Marched to Reams’ Station to support Wilson’s cavalry, and returned to the Jerusalem plank road on the 30th.

July 1 to 9. – Remained in camp near the Jerusalem plank road.

July 9 – Moved to City Point.

July 10. – Embarked for Washington.

Third Brigade, First Division, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Gideon Clark, One hundred and nineteenth Pennsylvania Infantry.

June 14 and 15. – On fatigue duty opposite Fort Powhatan.

June 16. – In the evening shipped on board transports.

June 17. – In the morning landed at Bermuda Hundred; remained within the lines of General Butler’s army until the morning of the 19th.

June 19. – Marched to the front of Petersburg; on picket on the banks of the Appomattox from that time until the evening of the 21st; moved that night with the rest of the corps to a position on the extreme left of the army, having been relieved by the Eighteenth Corps.

Changed positions frequently between the 21st and 25th.

June 29. – Moved out toward Reams’ Station, on the Petersburg and Weldon Railroad; on that day and the next, with other troops of the division, effectually destroyed several miles of that road.

July 2. – Left bivouac on the Jerusalem plank road, and returned to the position on the left of the army.

July 9. – Marched to City Point.

July 10. – On the evening of this day and morning of the 11th the command was shipped on board of transports, arriving at Washington on the 12th.

Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General Thomas H. Neill.

June 13. – Left trenches at 7 p.m. and marched all night.

June 14.- Marched all day to the west bank of the Chickahominy.

June 15. – Moved to Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Marched to and crossed James River.

June 17. – Arrived near Petersburg, and relieved Eighteenth Corps.

June 18. – Assaulted the enemy and carried a line of works.

June 21. – Moved to a position south of the Jerusalem plank road.

June 22. – Charged the enemy and established a line.

June 29. – Moved to Reams’ Station to support cavalry.

June 30. – Remained near Reams’ Station.

July 1. – Marched from Reams’ Station back to old camp near Jerusalem plank road.

July 9. – Marched at 9 p.m. to City Point.

July 10. – Embarked at 11 a.m. for Washington.

Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General James B. Ricketts.

June 13. – Marched, by way of Via’s, Hopkins’ Mills, Providence Church, Emmaus Church, to Jones’ Bridge, Chickahominy; after crossing about three-quarters of a mile encamped for the night.

June 14. – Marched at 4.45 a.m. by way of Vaiden’s Cross-Roads, and encamped about three miles from Charles City Court-House.

June 15. – Moved camp about one mile.

June 16. – Moved about one mile and a half from landing at Powhatan Point and threw up works to cover crossing of the James River. At 4.45 p.m. reached the landing and embarked on transports, landing at Bermuda Hundred, and marched to the intrenchments midway between the James and Appomattox Rivers.

June 17 and 18.- Remained in same place.

June 19. – Marched across the Appomattox to a position in rear of the line fronting Petersburg.

June 20. – Remained in same place.

June 21. – Marched at 4.40 p.m.; crossed the Petersburg and Weldon [Norfolk and Petersburg?] Railroad; went into position west of the plank road, near Williams’ house.

June 22. – Threw up works; some skirmishing about dark; advanced the lines about one mile.

June 23 to 28. – Remained at same place.

June 29. – Marched at 2 p.m., striking Petersburg and Weldon Railroad at Reams’ Station at 7.30 p.m.

June 30. – Threw up works and destroyed railroad. At 4.30 p.m. marched back to where we last left the plank road, near Williams’ house.

July 1. – Remained near the plank road.

July 2. – Returned to old camp near Williams’ house.

July 3 to 6. – Remained at same place. At 7 a.m. of the latter day the division moved out of their works and marched to City Point. At 2 p.m. embarked on transports for Baltimore.

Second Brigade, Third Division.

June 14. – Encamped near Charles City Court-House.

June 16. – Embarked in transports for Bermuda Hundred.

June 19. – Moved across the Appomattox to Petersburg.

June 21. – Moved to extreme left of the line, near Weldon railroad; intrenched.

June 22. – Heavy skirmishing until evening, when we charged to Weldon railroad, but found no enemy in force.

June 23 and 24. – Were outflanked and fell back to our former position near Williams’ house.

June 29. – Marched to Reams’ Station.

June 30. – Marched back to within three miles of Williams’ house.

NINTH ARMY CORPS.*

June 13. – Moved at 11 a.m.; crossed the Chickahominy at Jones’ Bridge and halted for the night. The Fourth Division marched to New Kent Court-House.

June 14. – Marched to James River and encamped near Wilcox’s Landing; Fourth Division marched beyond Slatersville.

June 15. – Crossed the James River at night, and moved in the direction of Petersburg. Arrived in front of the latter place at 6 p.m. [16th]. The Fourth Division marched to the Chickahominy River.

June 16.- Fourth Division crossed the Chickahominy;marched to the James River and encamped.

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*Commanded by Major General Ambrose E. Burnside.

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June 17. – Attacked the enemy in front of Petersburg. The Second Division made an attack at 3 a.m. and carried the enemy’s position, capturing 4 guns, 3 stand of colors, and several hundred prisoners. The Fourth Division crossed the James River.

June 18. – Attacked the enemy and gained a position across the Petersburg, and Norfolk Railroad. Loss in Third Division quite severe. The Fourth Division arrived at the front.

June 19. – Engaged in intrenching and strengthening position.

June 30. – Hold about the same position as on the 19th, since which time the troops have been engaged in skirmishing and strengthening line of works.

First Division, commanded by Brigadier General James H. Ledlie.

June 12. – The Fourth and Tenth U. S. Infantry, in accordance with telegram from headquarters Army of the Potomac, were transferred to the Fifth Corps. On the evening of the same day the division left the intrenchments near Cold Harbor and marched all night.

June 13. – Arrived at Tunstall’s Station at daybreak; started again at 11 a.m., and halted for the night near Jones’ Bridge, over the Chickahominy.

June 14. – Marched to James River, encamped about two miles below the pontoon bridge, and remained there until the night of the 15th.

June 15.- Soon after dark started and marched all night and until 6 p.m. the next day, arriving in front of Petersburg.

June 17. – Advanced at daybreak in support of the Second Division. This division not engaged until late in the p.m., when they charged, with severe loss, and took a line of works interior to those captured by General Potter, but in the night were obliged to leave them again on being attacked, as both flanks were entirely unprotected. The enemy, however, retired before morning to the line of works they now hold.

June 18.- In accordance with authority from headquarters Ninth Army Corps, the Twenty-first Massachusetts, Third Maryland, One hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers were transferred from the Second Brigade to the First ; the Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers from the First to the Second, and the Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery and Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery from the Third to the Second, by Special Orders, Numbers 27, of these headquarters. The division remained in reserve until the night of the 20th, when they relieved General Barlow’s division, Second Army Corps in the trenches, where they still [June 30] remain the Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, on their left, and General Turner’s division, Tenth Army Corps, on their right.

July 1 to 29.- Remained in trenches in front of Petersburg, Va., with constant sharpshooting and artillery practice, strengthening the works and erecting new ones, especially a mortar battery near the left of teh line held by the division.

July 21. – Brigadier General W. F. Bartlett, U. S. Volunteers, having reported to the general commanding the division, was assigned to the command of the First Brigade, to which the Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteers was transferred from the Second Brigade. The Third Maryland and One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volunteers were transferred from the First to the Second Brigade, to the command of which Colonel E. G. Marshall, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, was assigned.

July 29. – The division was relieved by Brigadier-General Carr’s division (colored), of the Eighteenth Army Corps, and formed in column of assault behind the line held by General Potter, commanding Second Division.

July 30. – Took part in the action of the exploded fort in front of Petersburg, Va., forming the advance of the charging column. The division suffered very severely, both brigade commanders being captured, among other casualties.

July 31. – Remained in rear, and after dark returned to the old position in the trenches, relieving General Carr’s division.

Second Brigade, First Division, commanded by Colonel Ebenezer W. Peirce, Twenty-ninth Massachusetts Infantry.

June 12 to 16. – Marched across the Peninsula.

June 17. – Severe action in front of Petersburg.

June 18. – Brigade reorganized.

June 21 to 30. – In front line on right of Ninth Corps, intrenching, picketing, skirmishing, and sharpshooting. This brigade was organized June 18 by order of Brigadier-General Ledlie.

July 1 to 29.-In First Division line before Petersburg, Va., intrenching, picketing, and sharpshooting.

July 29. – Moved to line of Third Division for assault.

July 30. – Action of the exploded fort; moved back to old camp.

Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General Robert B. Potter.

June 15. – Moved at dark and crossed James River about midnight.

June 16. – Reached position near Petersburg; division held in support of Barlow’s division, Sixth [Second] Corps, in attack on enemy’s lines at 6 p.m.; two brigades slightly engaged.

June 17. – Division attacked at 3 a.m. with bayonet; carried enemy’s position, capturing 4 guns, 3 colors, and several hundred prisoners; loss slight.

June 18. – Advanced lines one mile; enemy falling back. First Brigade attacked in afternoon and pushed lines well up to enemy’s front, crossing Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad.

June 30.- Division in intrenched position before enemy’s lines around Petersburg. More or less skirmishing night and day. Occasionally heavy artillery fire from both sides.

During the month the division has been in position before the enemy’s works around Petersburg.

July 30. – A mine, under the superintendence of Lieutenant-Colonel Pleasants, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and excavated by the enlisted men of the regiment, was sprung successfully. The division, in concert with the other divisions of the corps, charged the enemy’s position, carried his first line of rifle-pits, and advanced to a position overlooking a ravine as ordered. Being unsupported, the division fell back to the original lines.

First Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Henry Pleasants, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry.

June 14. – Arrived at camp near James River, Va.

June 15. – Left there.

June 16. – Arrived near Petersburg, Va., where we still [June 30] remain.

[July]- Engaged in siege operations in trenches before Petersburg, Va.

July 30. – Assault on enemy’s works.

Second Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General Simon G. Griffin.

June 12. – At night quietly withdrew from the works in front, moving in the direction of James River.

June 15.- Crossed the river at night.

June 16. – Arrived in front of the enemy’s works at Petersburg in the afternoon.

June 17.- At daylight the brigade made a most splendid and successful assault upon the works of the enemy, carrying the works and capturing 2 pieces of artillery and about 375 prisoners. Since then the lines have been gradually advanced, and the brigade now holds a very strong position in close proximity to the rebel lines.*

Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General Orlando B. Willcox.

June 15. – Crossed James River at Wind-Mill Point on pontoon bridge. Ordered to Petersburg to support of Eighteenth Corps.

June 16. – Took up position in front of Petersburg at 4 p.m.; Christ’s brigade in position on left of army; Hartranft’s brigade ordered to support of Birney’s division, Second Corps.

June 17. – Formed for assault at 9 a.m.; attacked at 12 m. Failed to carry the works, but gained and held some ground to the front and left of Second Corps; supported First Division, Ninth Army Corps, with one brigade. At 5.30 p.m. in second assault captured 1 stand of colors (Thirty-fifth North Carolina) and 100 prisoners. Loss during day heavy.

June 18. – Pressed forward at daylight; soon became engaged. At 12 a. m. charged the enemy’s line and carried a deep-cut track of Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad one mile from Petersburg. At 4 p.m. assaulted enemy’s new line; failed to take it; loss in killed and wounded severe.

June 19. – Held all ground gained and intrenched heavily. Were relieved from front line by Second Division, Ninth Army Corps.

June 20.- Relieved General Mott’s division, Second Corps, on King George Court-House road at Hare house; opened fire from battery on Petersburg.

June 23. – Erected work for artillery within 200 yards of enemy’s main line, and built abatis along whole line under heavy fire.

June 24. – Moved to the left and relieved General Crawford’s division, Fifth Corps, on front line, under fire.

June 25 to 29. – Engaged in strengthening, and straightening lines and getting artillery in position, building abatis, &c.

June 30. – Mortar battery, four guns, put in position. Since June 17 division constantly under fire, losing more or less men every day.

Since June 20 in the trenches without support. The Forty-sixth New York Veteran Volunteers assigned to division June 2, Second Brigade.

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*End of the June record. No itinerary for July on file.

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The Twenty-fourth New York Cavalry (dismounted) assigned to division June 9, from First Division, Second Brigade. The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers assigned to division June 11, First Brigade. The Thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry (dismounted) assigned to division June 29, First Brigade.

July 1. – The division was in the trenches in front of Petersburg and remained there defending the line and fortifying the position, until July 25, when one brigade (Humphrey’s)was taken to the rear, on being relieved by a brigade of the Fourth Division, Ninth Army Corps (colored), Colonel Sigfried commanding.

July 26. – Humphrey’s brigade (Second) was moved to the left of the army, on the Suffolk road, and occupied works held by the Second Corps.

July 29.- Humphrey’s brigade (Second) withdrawn from the left and moved to the rear of the First Brigade.

July 30.- The division was engaged in the assault on the enemy’s lines at the crater, supporting the First Division of the corps; carried a portion of the enemy’s breast-works on the left of crater by a front attack and captured 100 prisoners; First Brigade dug up two pieces of artillery from the crater produced by the blowing up of the enemy’s fort and turned them on the enemy. The division helped to repulse two attacks, losing quite heavily in killed, and wounded. At 3 p.m. returned from works captured into our original lines by orders.

July 31. – One brigade (Second) is on the front line repairing damage done to our works by charging over them; First Brigade (Hartranft’s) in camp in the rear.

First Brigade, Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General John F. Hartranft.

June 15. – Crossed the James River at Wind-Mill Point at midnight’ and marched to within three miles of Petersburg, where we halted at 4 p.m. of the 16th and formed our line of battle. At dusk we were moved to the right to support Birney’s division, of the Second Corps.

June 17.- We advanced this morning and charged the enemy’s works at 2 p.m. but owing to a severe flank fire of artillery and musketry from the left, and our line of direction being too much to the right, we withdrew with severe loss and supported the First Division, which made an advance at the same point during the night.

June 18. – At 5 a.m. the whole line made an advance for about a mile, the enemy having withdrawn from our immediate front during the night. At 12 m. we made another advance to the railroad, and at 3.30 p.m. attempted to storm the enemy’s works, which was not accomplished. Remained here until midnight, when we were relieved by the Second Division, Ninth Army Corps. Loss in this brigade very heavy.

June 20. – Moved about a mile to the right, and relieved Mott’s division, of the Second Army Corps.

June 24. – Were relieved by troops of the Tenth Army Corps and we in turn relieved Crawford’s division, of the Fifth Corps, on the left of the position held by us on the 18th. Here we still [June 30] remain, having advanced our line and thrown up heavy works.

This brigade held its own position under fire of the enemy before Petersburg, Va., up to July 30. During the month a great amount of labor was performed by the troops in fortifying and strengthening the lines, erecting bomb-proofs, digging covered ways, &c. The entire loss of the brigade from the 1st to the 29th, inclusive, on the line was 17 killed and 106 wounded.

July 30. – The command took part in the assault made by the Ninth Army Corps on the enemy’s works. The loss sustained was as follows: Killed, 5 officers ad 67 men; wounded, 14 officers and 248 men; missing, 4 officers and 127 men. At night the troops were withdrawn and put into camp about one mile in the rear of our lines.

Second Brigade, Third Division commanded by Colonel William Humphrey, Second Michigan Infantry.

June 15.- Crossed the James River at night.

June 16. – About noon arrived in front of Petersburg.

June 17.- Participated in the charge made by the division.

June 18. – Were engaged again, losing heavily. Colonel Christ, commanding brigade was wounded when the command was assumed by Colonel Raulston, Twenty-fourth New York (dismounted) Cavalry. He was wounded also, and Colonel William Humphrey, Second Michigan Volunteers, was assigned to the command on the 19th by order of General Willcox, commanding division. The Second Michigan Volunteers was transferred from the First to this brigade the same day.

Since the 19th the brigade has been in the trenches in front of Petersburg. No general engagement has taken place.*

July 1. – Occupied the advance line on the extreme left of the Ninth Corps line in front of Petersburg. Remained here, nothing occurring worthy of note until the 25th.

July 25. – The brigade relieved by a part of the First Brigade, Third Division, and a part of the First Brigade, Fourth Division, moved to the rear a short distance and encamped in the open field.

July 27. – Received orders to report to Brigadier-General White, commanding Fourth Division; marched to the extreme left of our line and occupied a position, our left resting on the old Norfolk road.

July 29. – Orders were received to recall pickets and be ready to march at dark. Moved at 9 p.m. toward our old position and halted near the headquarters of the Fifth Corps from 10.30 o’clock until about 3 a.m. next morning, when we moved toward the front.

July 30.- Participated in the assault on the enemy’s line in front of Petersburg; made one charge, which was partially successful. The loss of the brigade on this day was: Killed, 2 commissioned officers and 114 enlisted men; wounded, 13 commissioned officers and 99 enlisted men; missing, 5 commissioned officers and 85 enlisted men. Aggregate loss, 218.

July 31. – Occupy the front line, formerly held by the First Brigade of this division, excepting the First, Second, and Twentieth Michigan Regiments, which have been relieved, having suffered severely in yesterday’s engagement.

Fourth Division, commanded by Brigadier General Edward Ferrero.

June 13. – Marched to New Kent Court-House.

June 14. – Marched to and beyond Slatersville.

June 15. – Marched to Chickahominy River.

June 16. – Crossed Chickahominy River; marched to and encamped on the James River.

June 17. – Crossed the James River.

June 18. – Marched to the front.

June 19. – Rejoined the Ninth Corps.

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*End of the June record.

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June 20. – Relieved Second Corps in the second line of intrenchments.

June 23. – Relieved by part of Tenth Corps, and took position in rear of Second Division, Ninth Army Corps.

June 27. – Marched to Prince George Court-House.

June 30. – Took up position on left of army, relieving the Sixth Corps.

July 2. – Left camp on Jerusalem plank road and marched nine miles, taking up position on Norfolk road.

July 9. – Moved to extreme left of line beyond Jerusalem plank road.

July 12. – Moved near Norfolk road.

July 30. – Took part in the charge on the enemy’s works; fought two or three hours; were repulsed and lost heavily.

First Brigade, Fourth Division, commanded by Colonel Joshua K. Sigfried, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry.

June 13. – Marched to New Kent Court-House; ten miles.

June 14. – Marched to and beyond Slatersville; six miles.

June 15. – Marched to Chickahominy River; four miles

June 16. – Crossed Chickahominy and encamped on James River opposite Wilcox’s Landing; nineteen miles.

June 17. – Crossed James River; three miles.

June 18. – The brigade ceased to-day guarding the trains of the army and moved up to the front; marched twenty-two miles.

June 19. – Marched two miles near front and rejoined Ninth Army Corps.

June 20. – Relieved Second Corps in second line of intrenchments.

June 23. – Part of Tenth Corps relieved brigade, and it took up position in rear of Second Division, Ninth Army Corps.

June 26. – Reviewed by General Ferrero.

June 27. – Marched to Prince George Court-House; four miles and a half.

June 30. – Took up position on left of army occupied by Sixth Corps; marched seven miles to-day.

Second Brigade, Fourth Division, commanded by Colonel Henry G. Thomas, Nineteenth U. S. Colored Troops.

June 13.- Went to New Kent Court-House.

June 14. – Went to Diascond bridge.

June 15. – Started for the Chickahominy; went a short distance and staid all night.

June 16. – Crossed the Chickahominy River and went to within one mile of the James River.

June 17. – Crossed the James River; moved a mile and went into camp.

June 18. – Marched up near Petersburg.

June 19. – Moved a little farther to the left of the line.

June 20. – Went into the works in front; remained until the night of the 23d. – Moved to the rear and left of our old position, where we lay until the 27th.

June 27. – Marched to Prince George Court-House.

June 30. – Moved to near Jerusalem plank road, on the extreme left of our lines.

July 1. – Were near Jerusalem plank road.

July 2.-Moved up on the Norfolk pike, where we remained until 11 p.m. of the 9th, when we moved to the left of the Second Corps. Remained until the 12th, when we went back on the Norfolk pike and built a redoubt. Remained in this position until the 22d.

July 22.-Moved up to the old camp-ground near corps headquarters, where we remained until the 27th. We again went to the left near the redoubt. Remained until the night of the 29th, when we moved up to the rear of our corps; went into column and lay there until morning, when we went into the engagement of the 30th and lost very heavily. Came out and went into camp near where we left in the morning and staid until August 1.

CAVALRY CORPS.*

First Division, commanded by Brigadier General Alfred T. A. Torbert.

June 7 to 27.-Was engaged in expedition to vicinity of Gordonsville, fighting the enemy at Trevilian Station June 11 and 12, rejoining the army via Spotsylvania Court-House, Bowling Green, Walkerton, King and Queen Court-House, Dunkirk, White House, Jones’ Bridge, and Wilcox’s Landing; crossed the James River on ferry, and moved to Prince George Court-House to assist General Wilson, encamping at Reams’ Station on the night of June 30.

First Brigade, First Division, commanded by Brigadier General George A. Custer.

June 13 to 20.-En route to White House.

June 20 to 25.-En route to James River.

June 26 and 27.-In camp.

June 28.-Crossed the James River at Wind-Mill Point.

June 29.-Moved to Prince George Court-House, Va.

July 1.-On an expedition beyond Prince George Court-House, Va.

July 3.-Went into camp at Light-House Point; in camp until the 23d.

July 24.-Started on an expedition to Deep Bottom, on the James River; no casualties; returned to City Point, Va., and went into camp.

Second Brigade, First Division, commanded by Colonel Thomas C. Devin, Sixth New York Cavalry.

June 13.-Marched by Twyman’s Store, Shady Grove Church, Spotsylvania Court-House, Bowling Green, Newtown, Clarksville, and Walkerton to King and Queen Court-House, arriving at that point on the 18th.

June 19.-Marched by Walkerton and Clarksville to Dunkirk; crossed the Mattapony on the 20th, and marched by King William Court-House to Lanesville on the same day.

June 21.-Crossed the Pamunkey at White House and engaged the enemy near Saint Peter’s Church.

June 22.-Marched to Jones’ Bridge and crossed the Chickahominy.

June 23.-Engaged the enemy on the Long Bridge road.

June 24.-Marched by Charles City to James River.

June 25.-Marched to Wyanoke Landing.

June 27.-Crossed James River to Wind-Mill Point.

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*Commanded by Major General Philip H. Sheridan.

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June 28.-Marched to Prince George Court-House.

June 29.-Marched to Jerusalem plank road; thence back to Lee’s Mill.

June 30.-Marched to Jerusalem plank road.

[July]-The brigade encamped near Light-House Point until July 14, when ordered on picket to the left of the army, near Reams’ Station, Weldon railroad.

July 27.-Crossed the James River at Jones’ Neck.

July 28.-Engaged the enemy [in conjunction with Wilcox’s division of infantry*] near New Market; captured 2 battle-flags and 74 prisoners.

Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General David McM. Gregg.

June 13 to 19.-On march to White House.

June 20.-Crossed the Mattapony and encamped at White House.

June 21.-Crossed the Pamunkey, and skirmished with and drove the enemy’s cavalry, who had attacked the train the previous day.

June 22.-Encamped near Tunstall’s Station and fought the enemy.

June 23.-Marched to Chickahominy; crossed at Jones’ Bridge, and encamped near Saint Mary’s Church.

June 24.-Moved to Saint Mary’s Church and took position; enemy in front. This division was ordered to hold cross-roads until train had passed Charles City Court-House; position attacked by the enemy, with Fitz. Lee’s and Hampton’s division of cavalry, and held for some time; finally driven back with heavy loss. Captain W. Phillips, First Maine Cavalry, assistant commissary of musters on my staff, was killed at Saint Mary’s Church on the 24th. To say of this officer that he was a true gentleman, an excellent soldier, is but a slight tribute to his memory.

June 25.-Encamped near Wilcox’s Landing, on James River.

June 26 to 28.-In camp; First Brigade crossed the river on ferry-boats; Second Brigade crossed and encamped back of Fort Powhatan.

June 29 and 30.-On march to Templeton’s, on Jerusalem plank road, about four miles from Reams’ Station; portion of command under Colonel Stedman, Sixth Ohio, sent to Freeman’s Bridge, over Nottoway River.

July 1.-Marched to Warwick Swamp, on Jerusalem plank road; bivouacked at Templeton’s.

July 2.-Marched from Templeton’s to Prince George Court-House and encamped.

July 4.-Broke camp at 7 a.m.; marched to within four miles of Jordan’s Point.

July 6 to 11.-Picketing about Prince George Court-House and Light-House Point.

July 11.-At 6.30 p.m. broke camp and marched during the night.

July 12.-Reached left of the army about 5 a.m. and moved out on plank road; First Brigade moved out to Reams’ Station; Second Brigade moved out on plank road; met the enemy and drove him across Warwick Swamp; command camped on plank road.

July 13.-Marched to Warwick Swamp; took position at Lee’s Mill and established picket-line toward Jerusalem plank road.

July 14.-Quiet; in camp; enemy made slight demonstration on Reams’ Station road near Proctor’s Store.

July 15.-Quiet.

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*So in original, but Devin was engaged with Wilcox’s Confederate infantry.

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July 16.-Relieved by First Division; marched back to near Jordan’s Point and went into camp.

July 17.-Quiet.

July 18 and 19.-Quiet; Captain Treichel’s appointment as assistant commissary of musters confirmed by War Department; is ordered to enter upon the duties of the office in place of Captain Phillips, First Maine Cavalry, killed in action; Captain Harper, First New Jersey Cavalry, appointed provost-marshal: Doctor Rezner, acting surgeon-in-chief, relieved by Doctor Marsh, U. S. Army.

July 20.-Quiet.

July 21.-Quiet; camp inspected by corps and division inspectors.

July 22.-Camp inspected by commanding general.

July 23.-Quiet.

July 24 and 25.-Quiet; ordered to supply ourselves with four days’ rations and two of forage.

July 26.-At 5 p.m. marched from camp to Appomattox; crossed and proceeded to Jones’ Neck, on James River, marching all night.

July 27.-Crossed James River in rear of Second Corps and moved out toward Malvern Hill; bivouacked at Allen’s Chapel.

July 28.-Moved out toward Riddell’s Shop; the enemy attacked us with large infantry force, driving us back and capturing one gun, but afterward retreated, leaving their dead and wounded in our hands. Our loss in the fight was 108 killed, wounded, and missing. Being relieved by our infantry, returned to Allen’s Chapel.

July 29.-Quiet; division in line of battle all day; the First Brigade dismounted and the horses sent across the river; at night began crossing to south side of the river and marched all night.

July 30.-Still marching; crossed Appomattox at 6 a.m.; passed in rear of the Ninth Corps, going toward Lee’s Mill; took position; met the rebels, consisting of a portion of Butler’s brigade, and after a sharp skirmish drove them away and obtained water for our animals; relieved by First Division at 11 p.m.

July 31.-First Brigade marched to and took position on Norfolk railroad, picketing in front and connecting on right with First Division; Second Brigade took position at Prince George Court-House and established line with First Brigade. The line of this division perfect from railroad to James River; division headquarters near Prince George Court-House.

First Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General Henry E. Davies, jr.

July 1 to 11.-The brigade was engaged in doing picket duty.

July 11.-Moved toward Reams’ Station, where it encountered the enemy on the forenoon of the following day, driving him a considerable distance with but slight loss to the command; withdrew the same night and was again engaged in picket duty.

July 26.-Moved, in conjunction with the rest of the corps, across the Appomattox and James Rivers, encountering the enemy [28th] near to Malvern Hill, where a heavy engagement took place. The enemy, being for the most part infantry, succeeded in driving back our skirmishers and capturing one gun from Dennison’s battery, which the command was unable to bring off.

July 30.-The brigade recrossed the rivers mentioned above, and marched to take position on the left of the army, where it is engaged on picket duty at the close of the month.

Second Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel J. Irvin Gregg, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

FIRST MAINE CAVALRY.

June 22.-Having crossed the river at White House, skirmished with the enemy the greater part of the day near Black Creek with considerable loss.

June 24.-Engaged at Saint Mary’s Church with considerable loss; estimated number of miles traveled, 275.

July 1.-In camp near Lee’s Mill.

July 4.-Moved to Light-House Point.

July 10.-Received orders to report to Colonel Bryan, commanding cavalry detachment at army headquarters.

July 11.-Went on picket on the left of infantry.

July 17.-Moved to Light-House Point and went into camp.

July 26.-Broke camp and crossed the Appomattox; next day crossed the James River.

July 28.-Had one squadron engaged with the enemy near Malvern Hill; 4 men wounded.

July 29.-On picket.

July 30.-The enemy drove in our pickets, but not the reserve; 3 men wounded. The same night withdrew to south side of James River.

July 31.-Crossed the Appomattox and marched to Lee’s Mill, where the enemy were found in position on the opposite side; were held in reserve as a support for the battery; marched during the month 100 miles.

SECOND PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

June 11.-Advanced to Trevilian Station and fought; 3 men wounded. Remained there until midnight, when we marched, via Po River, Bowling Green, Spotsylvania Court-House, to Mattapony River, near West Point, where we encamped on the night of the 18th.

June 19.-Marched to Dunkirk.

June 20.-Marched to White House and crossed the river; dismounted before daylight of the 21st.

June 22.-Marched to near Jones’ Bridge.

June 24.-Moved to Saint Mary’s Church and engaged the enemy; 1 officer and 19 men wounded; 2 officers and 27 men missing. Moved at night to Charles City Court-House.

June 25.-Marched to near James River and remained until June 29; crossed river in transports and encamped near Fort Powhattan.

June 30.-Marched, via Prince George Court-House, to near Templeton’s, and made scout after Third Division.

July 1.-Reached Prince George Court-House and moved to Templeton’s, from which place made scout to near Nottoway River in search of Third Cavalry Division, and returned to Templeton’s same day.

July 2.-Marched, via Prince George Court-House, to near City Point and encamped.

July 4.-Moved to near Jordan’s Point and camped.

July 5.-On picket near Prince George Court-House.

July 6.-Marched to near Jordan’s Point.

July 11.-At dark marched to infantry, on Jerusalem plank road.

July 12.-Moved toward Proctor’s farm, via Jerusalem plank road, and met the enemy; 10 men wounded and 3 officers and 28 men captured or wounded and taken prisoners.

July 13.-Marched to Lee’s Mill and established picket-lines.

July 17.-Went to camp near Jordan’s Point.

July 24.-Marched to near junction of Norfolk railroad and road to Lee’s Mill and picketed; 2 men wounded on post by guerrillas.

July 25.-Marched to camp near Jordan’s Point.

July 26.-Left camp at 6 p.m. and marched, via Point of Rocks, to Jones’ Neck.

July 27.-Crossed James River on pontoon bridge and formed on right of Second Corps, near New Market road.

July 28.-Moved to near Malvern Hill and met the enemy’s infantry [Longstreet’s and Hill’s troops] about three miles from James River; 2 men killed we returned to near James River and encamped.

July 29.-Formed in line of battle [dismounted] in front of pontoon bridge and sent horses to the rear. At 5 p.m. mounted regiment and moved to near river-bank and encamped.

July 30.-Recrossed James River at 2 a.m. and marched, via Point of Rocks and Cedar Level, to Lee’s Mill, where we met the enemy and drove him a mile or two from Warwick Swamp. At 10 p.m. moved to Prince George Court-House and encamped there about 7 a.m. on the 31s.

July 31.-At 10 a.m. marched on Light-House Point road two miles in direction of that place, and picketed on roads in that vicinity.

FOURTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

June 21.-Reached White House.

June 22.-Skirmished with the enemy at Macon’s Mill.

June 23.-Marched to Jones’ Bridge.

June 24.-In the battle at Saint Mary’s Church, in which Lieutenant Colonel George H. Covode was mortally wounded; Lieutenant Young missing.

June 30.-At Prince George Court-House.

July 1.-Regiment near Lee’s Mill.

July 2.-Moved and encamped two miles from Prince George Court-House.

July 4.-On picket at Prince George Court-House.

July 5.-Relieved and joined brigade near Light-House Point; a scout under Lieutenant Paul sent to ascertain the fate of Colonel Covode.

July 7.-A party under Captain Parke recrossed, bringing the remains of Colonel Covode into our lines.

July 8 to 11.-In camp, when we broke camp, marching all night, passing to the left of our army.

July 12.-Moved on the Jerusalem plank road; the Second and Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry on a reconnaissance; attacked by a brigade just across Warwick Swamp and driven back across the swamp, the Second losing heavily, the Fourth very lightly; on picket on the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad.

July 13.-Relieved and encamped near Lee’s Mill.

July 16.-Reported to Colonel Bryan for picket; relieved and marched all night, going to our old camp near Light-House Point.

July 26.-At 5 p.m. left camp, and marching all night crossed James River on the morning of the 27th.

July 27.-On picket near New Market road; lost 2 men in action.

July 28.-The regiment was not engaged.

July 29.-Lay in dismounted line all day. At 11.30 p.m. moved out, passing over lines to Lee’s Mill, where some force was met.

July 30.-The regiment lightly engaged, Captain Martin’s command reppeling a saber charge; moved at night.

July 31.-Encamped at 4 p.m. near Prince George Court-House.

EIGHTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

June 12.-Regiment on picket; 9 p.m., relieved by Tenth New York Cavalry, and taking the advance, moved toward North Anna.

June 14.-Crossed the North Anna; moved to Corbin’s Bridge, on Po River; regiment on picket at Todd’s Tavern; twenty-four miles.

June 15.-Moved by Spotsylvania Court-House to beyond Weed Tavern and encamped; twenty-miles.

June 16.-Marched through Bowling Green; moved to White House road, near the Mattapony, and encamped; thirty miles.

June 17.-Moved, via Newtown, Chapel Hill, and Edwards’ Store, to near Weavertown [Walkerton] and encamped; eighteen miles.

June 18.-Moved by Weavertown [Walkerton] to beyond King and Queen Court-House and encamped; fourteen miles.

June 19.-Regiment detailed to escort prisoners and wagons to West Point; eighteen miles.

June 21.-Crossed Mattapony on transports.

June 22.-Moved from West Point to White House; rejoined brigade and encamped; twenty-one miles.

June 23.-Moved from White House, crossed Chickahominy at Jones’ Bridge, to near Charles City Court-House; fifteen miles.

June 24.-Moved out on road to Malvern Hill; met the enemy’s pickets at Saint Mary’s Church; drove them one mile; Companies D, I, F, and H dismounted. At 3 p.m. the enemy advanced upon our lines with heavy force of cavalry and infantry, driving in our lines; regiment charged on enemy, driving them to woods; regiment was then dismounted and engaged the enemy, but the enemy having received re-enforcements the whole line was compelled to fall back beyond Hopewell Church and encamped near Charles City Court-House.

June 25.-Moved to Douthat’s Landing and went into camp; fifteen miles.

June 26 and 27.-In camp.

June 28.-Crossed James River and encamped near Fort Powhatan.

June 29.-Moved at 5 p.m. toward Prince George Court-House, reaching that place at daybreak.

June 30.-Marched to Blackwater and encamped; thirty miles.

July 1.-At Lee’s Mill; moved out to Proctor’s farm; regiment went out to support Second Pennsylvania on reconnaissance to the Nottoway River; returned to near Proctor’s farm and went on picket on the road to Sussex Court-House; twenty miles.

July 2.-Moved back through Prince George Court-House toward Jordan’s Point and encamped; eighteen miles.

July 4.-Regiment ordered to report to Colonel T. M. Bryan, commanding cavalry, on Jerusalem plank road, and went into camp at McCann’s house; eighteen miles.

July 5 to 9.-Regiment on picket on Lee’s Mill, Gurley, and plank roads; regiment was relieved and moved back to camp.

July 10.-Relieved from duty with Provisional Brigade.

July 11.-Moved back to near Light-House Point and went into camp; fifteen miles. At 7 p.m. regiment moved toward front; six miles.

July 12.-Moved out on Jerusalem plank road; regiment went on scout to Lee’s Mill; returned to plank road at 12 p.m.; thirty-six miles.

July 13.-Moved out to Lee’s Mill and encamped; seven miles.

July 14 to 16.-In camp.

July 16.-Moved to near Light-House Point and went into camp; twelve miles.

July 23.-Regiment went on picket to Prince George Court-House; six miles.

July 25.-Regiment relieved and moved into camp; six miles.

July 26.-Broke camp near Light-House Point; moved to Point of Rocks, crossed the Appomattox, and encamped; eight miles.

July 27.-Moved toward James River; crossed, moved on road to Malvern Hill, and encamped on Allen’s farm; six miles.

July 28.-Moved toward Malvern Hill; command was engaged with the enemy; regiment made a reconnaissance over the battle-field, and at 3.30 p.m. moved back to Allen’s farm and encamped; thirteen miles.

July 29.-Command dismounted; formed line of battle; brigade massed in close column at 4 p.m.; regiment returned at 7 p.m.; moved out one mile and a half; remained in line until 9 p.m.; moved back and encamped; four miles.

July 30.-1 a.m. broke camp on Allen’s farm; moved to and crossed James River; moved toward Point of Rocks, crossed the Appomattox at that point, and moved out to Lee’s Mill; regiment on picket; twenty-five miles.

July 31.-Command moved back to Prince George Court-House and went into camp; ten miles.

THIRTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

June 24.-Met the enemy at Saint Mary’s Church, with loss of 2 killed, 14 wounded, and 28 missing.

June 30.-In camp near Prince George Court-House.

July 1.-Fell back from the Blackwater and encamped near City Point, Va.

July 5.-Moved camp to Light-House Landing.

July 12.-Took up line of march in direction of Petersburg, Weldon and Danville Railroad. At this point the regiment was ordered to protect the right flank of the First Brigade, which was then attacking the enemy. We lay in line from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. We were then ordered back to the brigade and detailed for picket on the plank road. During the night a squadron under Lieutenant Brown made a scout in the direction of the enemy’s lines, driving in their pickets, capturing 2; returned to camp without any loss.

July 16.-Again joined the brigade and fell back to the vicinity of the Blackwater, where we remained until the 17th, when we were relieved by the First Division and ordered to move to our old camp near Light-House Landing. Here we remained until the 20th, when the regiment was detailed on picket in the vicinity of Prince George Court-House.

July 23.-Relieved by the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry and returned to our old camp.

July 25.-Ordered to be ready to march with all available force at a moment’s notice in the direction of James River, with a view to crossing, which we did on the same night; crossed the Appomattox at Point of Rocks and the James at Turkey Bend.

July 27.-Moved out some two miles from the river and engaged the enemy, and fell back to the pontoon the same evening.

July 28.-The regiment remained in line of battle until 4 p.m., when it was ordered to relieve the First Maine Cavalry, which was then picketing in the vicinity of Malvern Hill.

July 29.-At 12 p.m. were ordered to be ready to fall back at any moment, and at 2 a.m. withdrew our pickets and recrossed the river at the above-mentioned point. Marched toward the Blackwater, where division attacked the enemy and regiment was ordered to support brigade battery. From here we fell back to our present camp [Prince George Court-House].

SIXTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.

June 13.-Encamped on north bank of North Anna River.

June 14.-Encamped near Todd’s Tavern; lost 1 man on picket.

June 15.-On march and encamped at 9 p.m.

June 16.-Encamped near Sparta.

June 17.-Encamped near Walkerton.

June 18.-Encamped near King and Queen Court-House.

June 19.-Encamped at Dunkirk.

June 20.-Crossed Mattapony River and encamped at White House.

June 21.-Crossed Pamunkey River; dismounted and engaged the enemy near Tunstall’s Station; no casualties; at dusk returned for our horses.

June 22.-On scout to Webb’s house.

June 23.-Destroyed railroad bridge across Pamunkey, and formed rear guard on march to Charles City Court-House, where encamped.

June 24.-Engaged with enemy near Saint Mary’s Church; formed rear guard on leaving field; lost 1 killed, 7 wounded, 3 missing.

June 25 to 28.-In camp back of Fort Powhatan.

June 29.-5 p.m., on march.

June 30.-On scout; encamped at Templeton’s.

July 1.-Encamped near Lee’s Mill; went on scout to Nottoway River.

July 2.-Marched with brigade to near Prince George Court-House.

July 4.-Changed camp to near Light-House Point.

July 7.-Went on picket to Prince George Court-House; relieved by Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry same day.

July 8.-In camp near Light-House Point.

July 11.-Marched to Jerusalem plank road.

July 12.-In line of battle near bridge on plank road.

July 13.-Marched to Lee’s Mill.

July 14.-Relieved Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry; on picket at Old Shop Church.

July 16.-Relieved by First Cavalry Division; marched to camp near Light-House Point.

July 26.-Crossed the Appomattox River; marched to Jones’ Neck.

July 27.-Crossed James River and encamped.

July 28.-Marched to near Malvern Hill; had a fierce encounter with the enemy; lost 14 men and 1 officer wounded and 3 men killed.

July 29.-In line of battle dismounted.

July 30.-Marched with brigade back to Lee’s Mill.

July 31.-Marched to camp at Prince Georgie Court-House.

Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General James H. Wilson.

June 13.-Drove him [enemy] across White Oak Swamp bridge; engaged him there until relieved by a brigade of General Crawford’s division; advanced on New Market road, meeting enemy at cross-roads; sharp and obstinate fight during the day, resulting in severe loss to the enemy; withdrew from near White Oak Swamp during the night; marched to Saint Mary’s Church and bivouacked.

June 14.-Marched to near Harrison’s Landing, where the two brigades were joined; drew rations and then posted one brigade near Phillips’, the other at Saint Mary’s Church, holding the country across from the James River to the Chickahominy at Jones’ Bridge.

June 15.-Pushed out strong reconnoitering force from both brigades toward their respective fronts; sharp fight near Smith’s Store by Colonel McIntosh’s brigade, without results.

June 17.-Crossed the James River near Fort Powhatan; moved beyond Prince George Court-House and bivouacked.

June 18.-Moved to Zion Church, near the Blackwater, and encamped until June 22.

June 21.-General Kautz, with 2,500 men, reported for duty with the division.

June 22.-At 2 a.m. broke camp and moved to Reams’ Station, destroying the track there and depot; thence to Dinwiddie Court-House, skirmishing with the enemy in our rear; thence to Ford’s Station, on South Side road, and bivouacked for five hours, destroying the track completely all along the march, and burning all railroad buildings, water-tanks, &c., 2 locomotives, and 30 cars.

June 23.-At 2 a.m. marched toward Burkeville Station, General Kautz in the advance. The Third Division encountered General W. H. F. Lee’s division of cavalry on the railroad between Blacks and Whites Station and Nottoway Creek; brisk and obstinate fighting from 2 p.m. until dark; punished the enemy severely; withdrew at daylight.

June 24.-Marched by way of Hungarytown to Meherrin Station, where General Kautz’s command again joined the division, having completely destroyed all railroad property at Burkeville Station and the track from Burkeville as far as Meherrin, and thence to Keysville; bivouacked at Keysville until daylight.

June 25.-Took up the march toward Roanoke Station, continuing the destruction of the railroad track, saw-mills, depots, &c., as far as the Roanoke or Staunton River; arriving at the bridge at 6 p.m.,we engaged the enemy with General Kautz’s command. Simultaneously with our attack upon the bridge a division of cavalry attacked our rear [the same met and defeated by us on the 23rd instant at Nottoway Creek], compelling Colonel Chapman to form line of battle; slight skirmishing ensued, with little consequence.

June 26.-At 12.30 a.m. withdrew from position, moving past the enemy’s fortifications eastward to Wylliesburg, where we halted and fed. At 7 a.m. took up the march to Christianville, and thence to within five miles of Saffold’s Bridge, where we bivouacked.

June 27.-Crossed the Meherrin early in the morning; marched on road to Smoky Ordinary and bivouacked at night near Great Creek.

June 28.-Took the road to the Nottoway River at the Double Bridges; crossed there at 2 p.m.; halted two hours; marched toward Stony Creek, where we came up with the enemy’s [Hampton’s and W. H. F. Lee’s cavalry] advance. A general engagement followed, in

which the enemy at first were driven by our men, who held the ground gained, notwithstanding frequent and spirited assaults by the enemy in largely superior numbers. Toward daybreak on the 29th moved via Stony Creek to Reams’ Station; heavy attack on our rear by the enemy in great force, the brigade of Colonel Chapman losing many killed and wounded. At Reams’ Station found enemy’s infantry and artillery in position; tried to cut though, but failed. Began retrograde movement toward Jarratt’s Station at 3 p.m., after destroying and leaving our train. Marched all night; crossed the Double Bridges at 12 m.

June 30.-Struck the Weldon railroad at early dawn; marched eastward on country roads to Peters’ Bridge, on the Nottoway River; bridge destroyed; forded the river and halted two hours. At 6 p.m. took the road to Waverly; traveled all night; reached Blunt’s Bridge, on the Blackwater, at about midnight.

July 1.-Found the bridge destroyed over the Blackwater; built a bridge; crossed by single file in three hours; marched beyond Cabin Point and went into camp.

July 2.-Joined Cavalry Corps in camp at Light-House Point, picketing alternately with the divisions the Prince George Court-House road and the left of the army.

July 29.-Moved near Jerusalem plank road, picketing the left of the army.

July 30.-Massed the command near Allen’s house, preparing to attack the enemy’s right; order countermanded; command went into camp near Westbrook.

Reserve Brigade, commanded by Brigadier General Wesley Merritt.

June 7 to 27.-Engaged in expedition to vicinity of Gordonsville, fighting at Trevilian Station on the 11th and 12th, rejoining the army via Spotsylvania Court-House, Bowling Green, Walkerton, King and Queen Court-House, Dunkirk, White House, Jones’ Bridge, and Wilcox’s Landing; crossed the James River by terry and moved to Prince George Court-House to assist General Wilson, encamping at Reams’ Station on the night of the 30th.

ARTILLERY.*

Brigadier-General Hunt was placed in charge of siege operations in front of Petersburg and south of the Appomattox June 27. During the month of July the Fourth Regiment New York Foot Artillery, Lieutenant-Colonel Allcock commanding, was engaged in constructing field-works and in preparing materials for the siege, the regiment having reported to chief of artillery Army of the Potomac July 14. Siege operations against the city [Petersburg] were pushed from south side of Appomattox.

July 30.-Under instructions from the chief of artillery, fire was opened on the enemy’s works from all the batteries south and east of Petersburg at about 4.30 a.m., immediately after the explosion of a mine under the advanced salient of his line. The cannonade was renewed during the day as circumstances required.

ENGINEER BRIGADE.+

June 13.-All bridge material-about 3,100 feet-in charge of Captains Lubey, Henderson, and Robbins, sent to Fort Powhattan, on the James River, by order of Lieutenant-General Grant.

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*Commanded by Brigadier General Henry J. Hunt.

+Commanded by Brigadier General Henry W. Benham.

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June 14.-The brigadier-general commanding went up to near Fort Powhattan by order, first, of General Butler and afterward by General Meade; completed bridge of some 2,200 feet [104 boats] across the James at Fort Powhatan.

June 15 to 17.-Occupied in crossing the army.

June 18.-At 3 a.m. finished taking up the bridge-rafted and brought it to City Point by order of General Meade; disembarked and went into camp on the banks of the Appomattox.

June 19.-Occupied in overhauling and arranging pontoon rafts.

June 20.-Sent Captain Lubey, with thirty-six boats, to lay a bridge at Jones’ Lauding, which was done without difficulty on the 21st.

June 23.-The Fifteenth New York Engineers engaged in building a road from the landing at City Point to the quartermaster’s corrals; finished on the 27th.

June 29.-Orders from General Grant to prepare and hold ready a bridge of twenty boats subject to the order of General W. F. Smith.

July 1.-Canvas train of twelve boats, with trucks, &c., arrived from Washington.

July 21.-A detail from the Fifteenth Regiment at work on the defenses at City Point, and continued at work through the month.

July 22.-A train of thirty boats with material sent to Captain Lubey, at Jones’ Neck.

July 26.-A bridge of thirty-six boats, under Captain Slosson, laid at Broadway Landing, on the Appomattox.

July 29.-A bridge of thirty-six boats, under Lieutenant O’Keefe, sent to Deep Bottom.

July 30.-Bridge returned, not being required.

ARMY OF THE JAMES.*

TENTH ARMY CORPS.

June 14.-Major-General Gillmore relieved by special orders this date, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.

June 17.-Brigadier General W. T. H. Brooks assigned to command of the corps by special orders this date, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.

June 19.-Corps reorganized by special orders this date, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.

June 20.-Brigadier General R. S. Foster, with Third Brigade of First Division, took permanent position on the left bank of the James at Deep Bottom.

June 23.-The Second Division temporarily assigned to duty with the Eighteenth Corps before Petersburg.

July 15.-Resignation of Brigadier General W. T. H. Brooks accepted, Special Orders, No. 238, Adjutant-General’s Office.

July 18.-Brigadier General A. H. Terry temporarily assigned to command of the corps, Special Orders, No. 61, Armies of the United States.

July 21.-Major General D. B. Birney assigned to command of the corps, Special Orders, No. 64, Armies of the United States.

July 30.-The Second Division, Tenth Corps, Brigadier-General Turner commanding, supported the assaulting column of Major-General Burnside upon the enemy’s works at Petersburg.

July 31.-The Second Division relieved from duty with the Eighteenth Corps before Petersburg and returned to Bermuda Hundred.

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*And other forces of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina.

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First Division, commanded by Brigadier General Alfred H. Terry.

June 14.-Brigadier General A. H. Terry assigned to temporary command of the Tenth Corps; Brigadier General R. S. Foster assigned to temporary command of the division.

June 16.-Major General W. F. Smith, with Eighteenth Corps, attacked and carried outer line of defenses of Petersburg. General Beauregard’s force withdrawn for the defense of that city from the works in front of our lines, which were immediately occupied by the troops of this division and the brigades of Brigadier-Generals Ames and Turner, the whole force being under the immediate command of Brigadier General A. H. Terry. The troops of this division were then pushed out upon the Richmond and Petersburg turnpike, which they held against the advance of Lee’s army, marching from the north side of the James River to the relief of Petersburg until near night-fall, when they were withdrawn by order of Major-General Butler. The brigades of Brigadier-Generals Ames and Turner, thus covered by this division, tore up and destroyed over two miles of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad near Port Walthall Junction. At night our picket-line was stationed in that portion of the rebel works nearest our intrenchments.

June 17.-The enemy advanced heavy columns against the center of our picket-line, which was driven in, thus giving them possession of the works abandoned by Beauregard on the morning of the 16. An attack made upon the right of the picket-line was repulsed with loss. General Lee in person said by prisoners to have directed attack on the center.

June 21.-Brigadier General W. T. H. Brooks having been assigned to command of Tenth Corps, Brigadier General A. H. Terry resumed command of the division, and Brigadier General R. S. Foster assigned to command of Third Brigade, with which he crossed James River at Deep Bottom, and intrenched to cover the pontoon bridge at that point.

Second Brigade, First Division, commanded by Colonel Joseph R. Hawley, Seventh Connecticut Infantry.

June 16.-Participated in the advance on the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad. The aggregate loss in killed, wounded, and missing is 203.

June 17.-The Sixth and Seventh Connecticut Infantry were attacked while endeavoring to hold the original picket-line, and though they inflicted severe loss on the enemy they suffered themselves to the extent of near 70.

[July.]-The brigade has not moved during the month. It has held the extreme right of the Bermuda Hundred line of intrenchments, and has been engaged in performance of picket duty.

Second Division, commanded by Brigadier General John W. Turner.

This division was organized per general orders, headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, dated June 19, 1864, and was stationed at Point of Rocks, on the Appomattox River, Va.

June 23.-The division reported for temporary duty to Major-General Smith, commanding Eighteenth Army Corps, near Petersburg, Va., and was at once placed in the trenches on the left of the corps, where it has remained up to the present time [June 30].

[July.] -This division was temporarily attached to the Eighteenth Army Corps during the month.

July 1 to 29.-On duty in the front, near Petersburg, Va.

July 30.-The division supported the assaulting column of Major General Burnside against the enemy’s works near Petersburg, Va., in which action it lost 312 killed, wounded, and missing.

July 31.-Returned to camp near Hatcher’s, Va., and assigned to duty in the line of intrenchments at Bermuda Hundred.

First Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel N. Martin Curtis, One hundred and forty-second New York Infantry.

This brigade was organized by virtue of general orders, headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, June 21, 1864.

June 23.-Marched from Point of Rocks to the advance line of our forces before Petersburg, Va., where it has since [to June 30] remained.

Second Brigade, Second Division.

June 12.-Received orders to proceed to the White House, where the brigade embarked for Point of Rocks, rejoining Tenth Army Corps.

June 13 to 22.-Holding intrenchments in front of the enemy, on picket, and other similar duties.

June 23.-Marched to front of Petersburg, Va., arriving at daybreak, and immediately went into rifle-pits, and have ever since been engaged in heavy skirmishing and constantly suffering under the fire from the shells of the enemy. In this position this report [dated June 30] leaves the brigade.

[July 1.]- The monthly return for June left this brigade in the intrenchments in front of Petersburg, Va., where it sustained a heavy fire during the entire night.

July 2.-Lieutenant Colonel William B. Coan, Forty-eighth New York Infantry, assumed command of the brigade by order of Brigadier-General Turner.

July 6.-Deserter informed that the enemy intended to charge that night; no assault.

July 7 to 25.-Constant skirmishing along picket-lines, with intervals of heavy shelling,&c., and occasional casualties.

July 26.-Enemy opened a very heavy fire of artillery.

July 29.-Received orders to move at dark, taking position in rear of Ninth Corps, some distance to the left of our former position.

July 30.-The brigade was advanced some 200 yards and close to the enemy’s works. Got into position to charge, when the troops on the left gave way and the brigade was compelled to fall back. Then, after holding the intrenchments for over two hours, were relieved by the Third Brigade and ordered back to its old position.

July 31.-Ordered to proceed to City Point; order countermanded, and directed to proceed to intrenchments at Bermuda Hundred, where it now remains.

Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General Orris S. Ferry.

Division organized by general orders from headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, dated June 19, 1864. First Brigade

stationed on the James River at Fort Powhatan, Wilson’s Wharf, and Bermuda Landing; Second Brigade doing duty on the left of the line of intrenchments in front of Bermuda Hundred.

EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS.*

June 12.-Left Cold Harbor.

June 13.-Embarked at the White House for Bermuda Hundred.

June 15.-Arrived near Petersburg, Va.

First Brigade, First Division, commanded by Colonel Aaron F. Stevens, Thirteenth New Hampshire Infantry.

During the month [July] this brigade has been doing duty in the trenches near Petersburg, Va.

July 29.-The command moved at 6 p.m. from the trenches and went to the support of the Ninth Army Corps.

July 31.-Returned to its old position at 12 p.m.

Second Brigade, First Division.

June 12.-Marched from Cold Harbor to White House.

June 13.-Embarked on transports and set sail for Bermuda Hundred.

June 14.-Arrived at Bermuda Hundred; disembarked and marched to the front.

June 15.-Crossed the Appomattox at Point of Rocks; moved up the right bank of that river and participated in the attack on Petersburg. The brigade assaulted and carried Battery No. 5, capturing 1 color, 5 guns, 200 prisoners, many small-arms, and an amount of camp equipage.

June 17.-Marched back to Bermuda Hundred.

June 21.-Returned to Petersburg and remained there to the end of the month, participating in the siege of that city.

The brigade retained its position on the right of the lines before Petersburg until the night of the 29th [July], when the command was relieved by a portion of the Second Corps and moved to the left of the Ninth Corps, relieving a portion of that corps at daylight on the 30th.

July 30.-During the engagement of this day the brigade held a portion of the line immediately on the left of Reservoir Hill. Late in the night were relieved by a portion of the Ninth Corps.

July 31.-At daybreak returned to former position, on the right of the lines.

Second Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel Griffin A. Stedman, jr., Eleventh Connecticut Infantry.

June 12.-Left Cold Harbor and marched to White House.

June 13.-Embarked on transports and arrived at Bermuda Hundred.

June 14.-Since this date have been engaged in the siege of Petersburg, Va.

During the last month [July] the brigade has been lying in the trenches near Petersburg, Va.

—————

*Commanded by Major General William F. Smith.

—————

July 30.-It participated in the assault upon the enemy’s lines by General Burnside, the officers and men showing by their coolness and bravery a zeal for the cause which cannot be surpassed by any other brigade in the service.

Third Brigade, Second Division, commanded by Colonel Harrison S. Fairchild, Eighty-ninth New York Infantry.

This brigade during the month [July] performed the duty of guarding the intrenchments and breast-works in front of the enemy, alternating forty-eight hours on duty, forty-eight hours in camp.

July 29.-Under orders, this brigade, with the rest of the Eighteenth Army Corps, marched in the evening to the left of the line to support General Burnside.

July 30.-In the morning the Ninth Army Corps, under Major-General Burnside, made an assault on the enemy’s line, the Eighteenth Army Corps, including this brigade, supporting the Ninth Corps. This brigade was not called into action, but was for a short time exposed to the artillery fire of the enemy, in which the casualties were small, as appears in detail on this report. In the evening the brigade returned to camp.

Third Division.

June 15.-Colonel Duncan’s brigade and the First [U. S. Colored] Regiment and Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry, of the First Brigade, engaged the enemy before Petersburg with considerable loss.

June 19.-The above troops were withdrawn to Point of Rocks, where the remaining regiments of the division were encamped. The First and Second Regiments Colored Cavalry were ordered to report to me for duty, and the division was reorganized by general orders, headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, June 19, 1864.

June 21.-The division was moved to the front before Petersburg, where it is now doing picket and fatigue duty.

June 28.-The Thirty-seventh [U. S. Colored] Regiment and the Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry were detached from the First Brigade and ordered to report to department headquarters.

[July.]-The division has been on duty in the trenches before Petersburg and on picket on the Appomattox during the month.

July 1.-General Hinks relinquished command of the division, and Colonel Holman, First U. S. Colored Troops, assumed command, which he retained until the 27th, when he obtained a thirty days’ leave of absence. Colonel S. A. Duncan, of the Fourth U. S. Colored Troops, assumed command until relieved by Brigadier General Joseph B. Carr, July 29, in compliance with the provisions of paragraph 5, Special Orders, No. 91, current series, from corps headquarters.

July 29.-In the evening the Second Brigade relieved a portion of General Ledlie’s division, of the Ninth Corps, and were held in reserve during the engagement of the 30th, returning to their former position on the night of the 31st, having suffered a loss of 1 enlisted man killed and 3 officers and 14 men wounded.

First Brigade, Third Division, commanded by Brigadier General Edward A. Wild.

June 15.-The First U. S. Colored Troops was the only regiment of this brigade which participated in the battle before Petersburg of this date.

June 16.-Brigade headquarters were moved from Wilson’s Wharf to Point of Rocks.

June 21.-The brigade moved from Point of Rocks to the field near Petersburg, Va., where it has been and is now [June 30] doing picket duty upon the line of Appomattox River.

Second Brigade, Third Division, commanded by Colonel Samuel A. Duncan, Fourth U. S. Colored Troops.

The Second U. S. Colored Cavalry assigned to Second Brigade per General Orders, No. 31, headquarters Third Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, June 22, 1864.

June 14.-The Second U. S. Colored Cavalry assigned to Second Brigade per General Orders, No. 31, headquarters Third Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, June 22, 1864.

June 15.-Marched toward Petersburg; found the enemy in rifle-pits at Baylor’s farm, four miles from Petersburg. Brigade formed and advanced in line of battle; charged and captured the works with one piece of artillery; moved on toward the city; reached the enemy’s main works at Jordan’s farm, two miles and a half from the city, at 6 p.m., with Brooks’ division on the right; charged and took these works, this brigade capturing Batteries Nos.7,8,9,10, and 11, with 5 pieces of artillery; remained near the front under fire until the 19th.

June 19.-Moved across the Appomattox; encamped near Point of Rocks.

June 22.-Crossed the Appomattox and marched to the front.

[July.]-Brigade remained during the month in front of Petersburg, Va.; did duty in trenches for twenty-six days of the month; was not engaged in any military operations of importance.

CAVALRY DIVISION.*

June 21.-Division left Point of Rocks, and reported same day to General Wilson at Mount Zion Church.

June 22.-Left at daylight for Reams’ Station [Petersburg and Weldon Railroad], which station and railroad were destroyed; from thence to Ford’s Station, on same railroad, destroying locomotives, station, and road at that place. Left at midnight for junction of Petersburg and Richmond and Danville railroads, which was also destroyed.

June 23.-Left junction at daylight, and during the 24th and 25th destroyed all that portion of the road as far as Roanoke Station.

June 27 to 29.-Occupied in returning to our lines, the last day of which had a severe engagement with the enemy, losing a large number of men.

June 30.-Went into camp on the James River, above Bermunda Hundred.

July 1 to 26.-The division remained in camp near Jones’ Landing, on the James River.

July 27.-Under command of Major-General Sheridan crossed the James River to Deep Bottom.

July 28.-Took part in the cavalry engagement near Malvern Hill.

July 30.-Recrossed the James River and returned to camp near Jones’ Landing; same day crossed the Appomattox near Point of Rocks and reported to Major-General Sheridan.

July 31.-Stationed at Lee’s Mill, doing picket duty.

—————

*Commanded by Brigadier General August V. Kautz.

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First Brigade, commanded by Colonel Robert M. West, Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

June 15.-Attacked the enemy’s works in front of Petersburg and were repulsed.

June 17.-Returned to camp, having marched sixty miles.

June 21.-Left camp on raiding expedition with Generals Kautz’ and Wilson’s divisions; destroyed the Petersburg and Lynchburg, Petersburg and Weldon, and Richmond and Danville Railroads.

June 25.-Attacked the enemy at Staunton bridge and were repulsed.

June 29.-Was attacked by an overwhelming force near Reams’ Station, in which affair this brigade lost 21 officers and 550 men.

June 30.-Reached camp near Jones’ Landing; marched 400 miles.

MEMORANDUM.-At the date of signing the report the aggregate loss has been reduced in this brigade by arrival from the scene of the conflict on the 29th to 7 officers and 231 enlisted men.

Second Brigade, commanded by Colonel Samuel P. Spear, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry.

June 15.-The brigade again advanced upon Petersburg; engaged the enemy, and returned to camp on the 17th. Loss, 1 officer killed, 1 wounded; 4 enlisted men killed, 3 wounded.

June 21 to 30.-On raid under General Wilson; participated in the destruction of Reams’ Station, 20 miles of railroad track on the Weldon and Petersburg road; Ford’s, Wilson’s, Blacks and Whites, and Nottoway Stations, and railroad track on the Petersburg and Lynchburg Railroad a distance of 30 miles; [Burkeville] Junction, Keysville, Meherrin, Drake’s Branch, and Roanoke Stations, saw-mills, shops, turnouts, and over 40 miles of track on the Richmond and Danville road. En route destroyed a large amount of Government stores, 2 locomotives, a number of platform and other cars, and made a most effectual destruction of the railroad. Engaged the enemy at Staunton River railroad bridge, and on returning at Reams’ Station, where the brigade suffered very heavily. Loss 19 officers and 670 enlisted men killed, wounded, and missing, 712 horses, and 2 mountain howitzers [12-pounders].

July 1 to 26.-Brigade stationed near Sherman’s Landing, on James River.

July 27.-Crossed James River at Strawberry Plains and participated [28th] in cavalry engagement at Deep Bottom under General Sheridan.

July 30.-Recrossed James River and proceeded to camp at Jones’ Neck; crossed the Appomattox at Point of Rocks, and arrived at Lee’s Mill, seven miles southwest of Petersburg, on the 31st, where the brigade is now doing picket duty.

DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA.*

SUB-DISTRICT OF NEW BERNE.

[June.]-An expedition under the immediate command of Colonel P. J. Claassen, commanding One hundred and thirty-second New York Volunteers and New Berne outposts, and consisting of detachments of One

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*Commanded by Brigadier General Innis N. Palmer.

—————

hundred and thirty-second New York, Fifteenth Connecticut Volunteers, Third New York Light Artillery [four pieces], and Companies B and D, Twelfth New York Cavalry, went to the immediate vicinity of Kinston, N. C.; returned with a loss of 1 killed and 3 wounded; captured 5 officers and 48 men, with a number of horses, mules, and other property.

SUB-DISTRICT OF BEAUFORT.

June 20.-The One hundred and fifty-eighth New York, Ninth Vermont, with one section of Battery C, Third New York Light Artillery, Lieutenant Jones; one section of Battery C, First U. S. Artillery, Lieutenant Wilson; First Squadron, Twenty-third, and Company E, Twelfth New York Cavalry, and Company L, First North Carolina Volunteers [mounted], marched from Croatan via Pollocksville, Young’s Cross-Roads, and Jacksonville. At the same time 100 men of the Ninth Vermont landed at Snead’s Ferry, destroyed the ferry-boats, took prisoners, &c.; returned on the 26th, having captured about 25 prisoners, horses, arms, &c.; destroyed 2 ferry-boats and 1 schooner loaded with salt and turpentine. Several brisk skirmishers occurred on the road.

Source:

  1. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), pp. 178-218

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