NP: June 14, 1864 Richmond Examiner: The End Of The Petersburg Raid

   

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in June 1864

Editor’s Note: This article was transcribed by Ken Perdue.

THE END OF THE PETERSBURG RAID

We get from the Petersburg papers the following, showing the result of the recent raid on that city — the killed and wounded and the citizens captured by the enemy:

PRISONERS CAPTURED BY THE ENEMY.

The Rev. Mr. Hall, of the Washington New Orleans battalion of artillery, who was announced as among the captured, made his escape at dark and reached Petersburg. Mr. Hall states that the enemy captured about thirty prisoners nearly or quite all of whom are members of the militia force and residents of this town. He recollects the following only:

A. M. Keiley, Esq., member of the Virginia Legislature from this city.

Rev. John A. Jefferson, J. H. Labmeyer, John McIlwaine and John E. Smith — all of Petersburg.

Thomas D. Davidson, of the Davidson Female College.

William T. Davis, of the Southern Female College.

James Kerr, who is slightly wounded in the side.

John Davidson, leather merchant.

Captain J. E. Wolf, of this city.

Peyton Alfriend, saddle and harness manufacturer.

John B. Stevens, city chamberlain.

William T. McCandlish, who is slightly wounded.

Richard McCandlish.

Timothy Rives, Esq., of Prince George.

Thomas H. Daniel, of Prince George.

Mr. Chalkley, of the firm of Cooke & Chalkley.

The following are missing and supposed to have been captured:

E. A. Broadnax, Mr. Kinsman and Joseph Peebles.

THE KILLED AND WOUNDED.

Two of the severely wounded mentioned in our last paper have since died. Guy G. Johnston, late Adjutant of the Thirty ninth Virginia militia, died Friday. He was severely wounded in the fight of Thursday. Mr. Johnston was a native of Connecticut, but married in Petersburg, and had resided there for twenty or thirty years past.

Mr. Henry A. Blanks also died on Friday. Mr. Blanks was over fifty years of age, and enjoyed the confidence of the people to a great degree.

The condition of Mr. William H. Hardee, one of  our most prominent and popular merchants, whose right leg was amputated below the knee, is in a very precarious condition, and his recovery is considered doubtful.

Dr. William Bellingham is still suffering greatly from his wounds, and Mr. Samuel Hall is in like condition. Mr. William A. Manley is suffering greatly from his injuries.

Joseph H. Cooper, Jr., is wounded and a prisoner in the enemy’s hands.

The following are some of the wounded whose names were not given in the previous list:

Mr. Richard Bagby painfully, but not dangerously wounded in the side. Mr. Bagby volunteered in one of the South Carolina regiments, and fought in the engagements near Port Walthall Junction, some three weeks since.

Samuel Cuykendall wounded in the leg.

James Cousins, shot in the breast and face.

James Bowie lost an arm.

Willie Harwood, son of John D. Harwood, severely wounded in the arm, has been compelled to submit to amputation. The limb was taken off at the shoulder joint.

Mr. George V. Scott, who was severely wounded in the face and thigh, is suffering intensely from the wound in his thigh.

OBSEQUIES OF THE DEAD.

The obsequies of John E. Friend took place Friday from Saint Paul’s Episcopal church, the Rev. W. H. Platt, officiating. The large building was filled to repletion, and the tears of the congregation testified to the high worth of the gallant dead.

From the same building, at one o’clock, P. M., the funeral of the late Wayles Hurt took place. — Another crowded congregation was present, and many a comrade of the gallant youth wept bitter tears of regret.

The funeral of the late George B. Jones, Esq., took place Friday afternoon at five o’clock, from his residence on Marshall street, the Rev. William H. Wheelwright, of the Washington street Methodist Episcopal church, officiating. A large concourse of persons were in attendance, and the occasion was one of unusual solemnity.

The other funerals of the citizens, who fell defending their homes, were announced for Saturday.1

Note: This newspaper article is used with the permission of NewsInHistory.com.  All rights reserved.

Source:

  1. Richmond Examiner, June 14, 1864

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