NP: June 13, 1864 Richmond Examiner: More of the Petersburg Raid

   

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in June 1864

MORE OF THE PETERSBURG RAID

Petersburg papers of Saturday bring us some additional information of the recent raid on that city.

THE ENEMY’S RETREAT

The enemy’s retreat, which was first conducted with good order, soon became a general stampede.  It is stated by persons residing in the county that they conceived the idea that General Beauregard was advancing in that direction with a very large force, and fears of capture and slaughter filled their minds to the exclusion of every other thought.  In their retreat to reach Broadway or Point of Rocks, their rendezvous on the Appomattox, they made a detour of at least twenty five or thirty miles, when, but for their fears, a distance of eight or ten miles would have been all sufficient.  They arrived at Broadway about eight o’clock, P.M., when they stopped to feed and rest.  They carried off four ambulances of wounded, and buried many of their dead in the woods.  A lady in Prince George, at whose house they halted briefly for water, says they estimated their total casualties at about one hundred and fifty, and that General Kautz was greatly chagrined at the idea that so many of his well disciplined troops should have been killed and wounded by a parcel of “d—d militia,” to use his own profane language.

We learn from Mr. Hall, who was captured, but succeeded in making his escape, that the enemy lost two pieces of cannon, instead of one.  We captured one, and the other became disabled, so that they were compelled to abandon it.  The adjutant general of Kautz was terribly excited about the loss of this last piece, and foamed and fretted at a great rate.  Kautz was greatly disappointed at the result of the expedition, and seemed deeply mortified that he should have been defeated by militia.

We captured eleven horses from the enemy, and killed thirteen, which were found after they retreated.1

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Source:

  1. Richmond Examiner (Richmond, VA), June 13, 1864

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