BTC Notes: History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers

   

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Subject: History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers by George H. Stowits

Important Points:

Notes:

  • Earlier chapters do not discuss the Bermuda Hundred Campaign or the Siege of Petersburg and were not consulted for the purposes of this research.

Chapter XXXIV. CLOSING OF THE RECRUITING OFFICE AT BUFFALO.-THE REGIMENT OBDERED FROM MORRIS ISLAND TO GLOUCESTER POINT.-PREPARATIONS FOR A SUMMER CAMPAIGN.-EMBARKED ON TRANSPORTS.-LANDING AT BERMUDA HUNDRED.-GEN. BUTLER IN COMMAND.-MARCHED TO THE PETERSBURG AND RICHMOND RAILROAD.-FOUGHT THE ENEMY, TORE UP THE RAILROAD AND DESTROYED THE TELEGRAPH.

  • 100th NY reached Fort Monroe on May 5 and landed at Bermuda Hundred on May 6, 1864.1
  • 100th NY participated in the Battle of Port Walthall Junction and helped tear up a part of the railroad between Richmond and Petersburg on May 6-7, 1864.2

Chapter XXXV. THE FIGHT AT WALTHAL JUNCTION.-THE REPORT OF COL. G. B. DANDY AND FAVORABLE MENTION OP OFFICERS AND MEN.-THE ADROIT MOVEMENTS OF GEN.BUTLER ON CITY POINT AND BERMUDA HUNDRED.-THE BUILDING OF WORKS FROM THE JAMES TO THE APPOMATTOX.-THE ADVANCE ON THE 12TH AND 13TH OF MAY.-THE TAKING OF ONE OF THE OUTER FORTS OF THE WORKS AT DRURY’S BLUFF.-THE CHARGE OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH REGIMENT AND THEIR SUFFERINGS.

  • 100th NY worked on entrenchments along the Bermuda Hundred front from May 9-May 12, 1864, missing the Battle of Swift Creek.3
  • The 100th NY participated in the four day expedition to and Battle of Drewry’s Bluff.  This chapter focuses on the first part of the action, including a charge by the 100th NY.4

Chapter XXXVI. THE ADVANCE ON FORT DARLING.—THE SKIRMISHERS OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH.-THE WOUNDING OF LIEUT. HOYT.-THE TAKING OF THE RAIL FENCE.-THE ADVANCE OF MAY 16TH.-THE FATAL RESULTS.-AGAIN WITHIN INTRENCHMENTS.-DUTY IN CAMP AND ON THE PICKET LINE.-THE REPORTED ASSAULTS OF THE REBELS ON OUR LINE.-GEN. WALKER TAKEN PRISONER.-GEN. BUTLER REINFORCES GRANT.

  • The 100th NY participated in the four day expedition to and Battle of Drewry’s Bluff.  The second portion of that expedition, including the main Battle of Drewry’s Bluff, is covered in this chapter.5
  • After Drewry’s Bluff, extensive work was done on the Bermuda Hundred line to make it impregnable.6
  • It is unclear from the text whether or not the 100th NY participated in the Battle of Ware Bottom Church on May 20, 1864.  It appears they were close to the action if not fully engaged.7
  • In early June 1864, Butler sent Smith’s Eighteenth Corps to the Army of the Potomac around Cold Harbor.8

Chapter XXXVII. THE REGIMENT STILL AT BERMUDA HUNDRED.-CONSTANT FIRING OP THE REBELS ON OUR PICKETS.-THEY EVACUATE THEIR WORKS.-WE ENTERED THEM,REACHED THE RAILROAD, AND TORE UP TRACK FOR THREE MILES.-ASSAILED BY PICKETT’S DIVISION.-THE REBELS REPULSED.-WE HELD THEIR PITS.-THEY ASSAULT ON THE 17TH OF JUNE.-ARE REPULSED.-THE BRIGADE ORDERED TO DEEP BOTTOM.-MADE A LANDING AND INTRENCHED.-CAPT. GRANGER CHARGED THE GROVER HOUSE AND DROVE THE REBELS.

  • In early June 1864, the 100th NY occupied a spot was “on a high bluff overlooking Dutch Gap, Fort Harrison and the rebel works on the opposite side of the James river.9
  • As the Army of the Potomac crossed the James and assaulted Petersburg south of the James River, the 100th NY was involved in an attempt on June 16 to force the enemy lines opposite Bermuda Hundred.  The railroad between Petersburg and Richmond was reached, but General Terry’s forces were soon forced back after reinforcements from Lee arrived.  Elements of Pickett’s division tried to retake the former Confederate skirmish line on June 17, 1864, but were repulsed.10
  • The 100th NY crossed the James at Deep Bottom with its brigade on June 20, 1864 and established a bridgehead for future use.11

Chapter XXXVIII. THE POSITION OF THE GROVER HOUSE.—THE ASSISTANCE OF THE GUNBOATS.-THE REBELS SHELLED.-OUR POSITION AT DEEP BOTTOM CONTRASTED WITH THAT ON THE BERMUDA FRONT. THE WORKS ON OUR FRONT WERE MADE STRONG.-THE BRIGADE WAS REINFORCED.-JULY 27TH HANCOCK AND SHERIDAN MOVED UPON OUR RIGHT.-THE WHOLE LINE MOVED.-CO. “K,” CAPT. GRANGER, MADE ANOTHER CHARGE.-CAPT. RICHARDSON KILLED.-HIS BODY WAS NOT RECOVERED.

  • The 100th NY remained in the Deep Bottom Bridgehead in July 1864, and in mid-July a dismounted Maryland cavalry regiment joined the brigade.12
  • On July 27, 1864, Hancock’s Second Corps, AotP crossed north of the James using the Deep Bottom bridgehead, and the 100th NY was involved in pushing forward its skirmish line to feel the Confederate lines.13

Chapter XXXIX. Preparations For The Advance On The North Side Of The James At Deep Bottom.-Hancock’s Corps And Gregg’s Cavalry With Terry’s Division Of Birney’s Tenth Corps.-Moved Out Of Works At Deep Bottom On The Morning Of August 15th.—The One Hundredth Charge And Take A Battery Of Four Guns.-Make A Connection With Hancock And Moved To The Front, And Led Into The Charge On The Enemy’s Works At Fussil’s Mills.

  • Foster’s Brigade and the 100th NY were involved in the Second Deep Bottom expedition in mid-August 1864.  All action prior to the August 16, 1864 charge is covered in this chapter.14

Chapter XL.THE CHARGE ON THE REBEL WORKS, AUGUST 16TH.-THE REGIMENT REPULSED.-FELL BACK AND THREW UP INTRENCHMENTS.-THE REBELS ATTACK AND ARE REPULSED IN TURN.-THE DEAD WERE BURIED UNDER A FLAG OP TRUCE.-WITHDREW ON THE NIGHT OF THE 18TH.-MOVED TO OLD CAMP AT DEEP BOTTOM.-REGIMENT LOST SEVENTY-THREE KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING.-PAYMASTER ARRIVED.-MONEY EXPRESSED HOME.

  • Foster’s Brigade and the 100th NY were involved in the Second Deep Bottom expedition in mid-August 1864.  This chapter covers the charge of August 16, 1864 as well as the rest of the movement against and retreat from Deep Bottom.  The 100th suffered 73 casualties during this expedition and the fighting which occurred.15

Chapter XLI.HANCOCK AND GREGG WITHDRAWN FROM THE NORTH SIDE OF JAMES RIVER.-THE ONE HUNDREDTH AGAIN AT DEEP BOTTOM.-ORDERED TO THE TRENCHES BEFORE PETERSBURG.-OCCUPIED THE POSITION HELD BY THE NINTH CORPS.-GENERAL BURNSIDE.-LIFE IN THE TRENCHES.-COL. DANDY GONE TO BUFFALO.-FEW OFFICERS FOR DUTY.

  • The 100th NY was ordered into the Petersburg trenches south of the Appomattox River on August 29, 1864 (though Stowits in the detailed report says August 26) in positions formerly held by the Ninth Corps, very near the famous Crater.16

Chapter XLII. WITHDRAWAL OF THE REGIMENT FROM THE TRENCHES OF PETERSBURG.-A FEW DAYS’ REST AT THE REAR,PREPARATORY TO ANOTHER MOVE.-MOVED ON THE EVENING OF THE 28TH SEPT.—CROSSED AT DEEP BOTTOM.-TOOK FORT HARRISON, SPRING HILL AND THE ENTIRE LINE OF THE REBEL WORKS.-THE WORKS WERE TURNED, AND WE WERE ASSAULTED 7TH OCT., AND GAVE THE ENEMY A SEVERE AND BLOODY REPULSE.-WITHDREW AND CAMPED A FEW DAYS AT DEEP BOTTOM.-RETURNED TO THE FRONT.

  • The 100th NY left the trenches on the evening of September 24, 1864.  They rested until September 28, when they began the expedition towards Fort Harrison.17
  • A discussion of the northern efforts of the Fifth Offensive is had on pages 305-30718
  • The 3rd Brigade and the 100th NY were involved in the Battle of Darbytown and New Market Roads on October 7, 1864, covering the withdrawal of Kautz’ cavalry after a reconnaissance in force toward Richmond from the east.19
  • The 100th NY was ordered to the rear at Deep Bottom on October 9, 1864 but was soon sent back to the same position at the front.20
  • The 100th NY received around 200 recruits in mid-October 1864 (date not given but assumed to be shortly after October 13, 1864 based on the text).  The 206th PA was added to the 3rd Brigade at this time as well.21

Chapter XLIII. THE REGIMENT ORDERED TO THE FRONT FROM DEEP BOTTOM.-A VISIT FROM G. S. HAZARD, PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE, BUFFALO.-MAJ. NASH HONORABLY DISCHARGED.-RETURN OF COL. DANDY.-TWO HUNDRED RECRUITS ARRIVED.—THE FIGHT ON THE DARBYTOWN ROAD, OCTOBER 27TH.-THE TROOPS RETIRE BEHIND THEIR WORKS FOR WINTER QUARTERS.-THE MUSTER OUT OF THE “OLD MEN.”-THEIR RETURN TO BUFFALO.

  • Between October 13 and October 26, 1864, Major Nash was honorably discharged and Colonel Dandy arrived from his recruiting trip to again take charge of the 100th NY.22
  • The 100th NY participated in the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, which was fought October 27-28, 1864 and was a part of the Sixth offensive against Petersburg.23
  • The 100th NY went into winter quarters after the Second Battle of Fair Oaks.  The 10th CT was detached and sent to the fort on Spring Hill.  The 100th was on the line just to the right of where the Con federates had attacked on October 7, 1864.24
  • In mid-December 174 officers and men whose enlistments had expired were mustered out and left the 100th NY for home.25

Chapter XLIV. COL. PLAISTED ISSUED AN ADDRESS TO THE THIRD BRIGADE.-COL. DANDY IN COMMAND OF BRIGADE, CAPT. BRUNCK OF REGIMENT.-THE “OLD MEN5′ OF THE REGIMENT MUSTERED OUT.-THEIR RECEPTION BY THE BOARD OF TRADE.-THE ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT, G. S. HAZARD.—THE PROMOTIONS IN THE REGIMENT.-ARRIVAL OF RECRUITS.-EXECUTIONS OF DESERTERS.-OCCUPATION OF TROOPS IN WINTER QUARTERS.-GEN. BUTLER RELIEVED.-GEN. ORD IN COMMAND.-REBEL DESERTERS.

  • Col H. M. Plaisted left the command of the 3rd Brigade on November 1, 1864 and went on a leave of absence.  Col Dandy took command of the brigade and Captain Brunck took command of the 100th NY, but by early December Plaisted had returned.26
  • As of mid-December 1864, the regiment was composed of all new men except for 50 veterans who had reenlisted.27
  • January, February, and March wee spent training the mostly brand new regiment, and the regiment suffered from many desertions due to bounty jumpers.28

Chapter XLV. ROUTINE OF CAMP DUTIES BEFORE RICHMOND.-PROMOTIONS DURING THE WINTER.-GRANT’S MOVEMENT ON THE LEFT.-SHERIDAN’S GRAND CAVALRY RAID.-BRIGADE, DIVSION AND CORPS REVIEWS, ATTENDED BY PRESIDENT LINCOLN, SECRETARY STANTON, GRANT AND MANY LADIES.-THE FINE APPEARANCE OF THE ARMY AT THIS DATE.-MOVED MARCH 27TH FOR THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE JAMES AT HATCHER’S RUN.-ADVANCED UPON THE ENEMY’S WORKS.

  • After a shuffle of commanders due to Col Plaisted’s illness, the 100th NY was commanded by Major Dandy, the colonel’s brother, and moved south of the Appomattox into the Petersburg lines, taking the place of a portion of the Second Corps on the morning of March 28, 1865.29
  • On March 30 the 1st Division was ordered to drive in the Confederate pickets and get as close as possible to the Confederate line.30

Chapter XLVI. THE STEADY ADVANCE UPON THE ENEMY’S WORKS.-THE REBELS ASSAULT ON THE MORNING OF APRIL 1ST.-THEY ARE SUCCESSFULLY REPULSED.-REGIMENT CONTINUES TO INTRENCH.-THE ADVANCE APRIL 2d, AND STORMING OF PORT GREGG IN THE REAR OP PETERSBURG.-PROMOTIONS IN THE REGIMENT MARCH 30TH.

  • The 1st Division and the 100th NY spent March 31 inching closer to the Confederate works and building breastworks to consolidate their gains.  They beat off a night attack against their lines early on the morning of April 1, 1865.31
  • On April 2, 1865, the 100th NY and the 1st Division took possession of abandoned Confederate lines made untenable by the Sixth Corps breakthrough that morning.  The division was then ordered to assault Fort Gregg (consistently called “Grigg” by the author).  The details of the assault are described in the next chapter.32

Chapter XLVIII. THE ASSAULT OF FORT GRIGG IN THE REAR OF PETERSBURG.-THE WORK ASSIGNED TO THE FIRST DIVISION,TWENTY-FOURH ARMY CORPS.-THE LOSS OF MAJ. DANDY OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH NEW YORK.-THE FORT TAKEN, AND GARRISON NEARLY ALL KILLED AND WOUNDED.-THE PURSUIT OF GEN. LEE.-ARRIVAL AT BURKESVILLE.-PASS THROUGH FARMVILLE,AND REACH THE REBEL ARMY AT APPOMATTOX.—FIGHTING THE LAST BATTLE.-SURRENDER OF LEE’S ARMY.-ITS PAROLE.-NEWS OF THE PRESIDENT’S ASSASSINATION.-RETURN MARCH.-ENTERING RICHMOND.

  • Details of the bloody attack on Fort Gregg, a last stand for the Confederates guarding the entrance to Petersburg from the southwest and west.  Major Dandy, the regimental commander of the 100th NY, was killed in the charge.33
  • The 100th NY escaped any fighting in the Appomattox Campaign because they were detailed to guard the wagon train.34

Unit Strengths

  • ~700 men prior to battles around Drewry’s Bluff, around May 12, 186435

Unit Armament

  • None mentioned.

Unit Commanders:

  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col George F. B. Dandy had newly returned to lead the regiment in mid-April 1864 and was still in command at the outset of the Bermuda Hundred Campaign.  He had been on a recruiting trip to Buffalo, New York.36
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col H. M. Plaisted of the 11th Maine was in command of the brigade at the start of the Bermuda Hundred Campaign in early May 1864.37
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col George F. B. Dandy was in command from May 13-May 16, 1864 at the Battle of Drewry’s Bluff.38
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: BG Robert S. Foster was in command of the Brigade on June 20, 1864 according to this book.39
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col George B. Dandy was in command of the 100th NY during the Second Battle of Deep Bottom in mid-August 1864.40
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Major Daniel D. Nash was in command of the regiment starting sometime in early September 1864 and lasting thirty days while Col. Dandy was absent on leave.  Stowits does not mention the exact date.41
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col H. M. Plaisted of the 11th Maine took command of the brigade sometime in late August when General Foster was placed in command of a division.42
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Major Daniel D. Nash was in command of the 100th NY during the Fifth Offensive in later September-early October 1864.43
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col H. M. Plaisted commanded the brigade at the Battle of Darbytown and New Market Roads on October 7, 1864.44
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Captain Frank C. Brunck was in command of the 100th NY at the Battle of Darbytown and New Market Roads on October 7, 1864, filling in for Major Nash, who was “suffering from a severe swelling on the side of his neck.”45
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Colonel George B. Dandy resumed command of the 100th NY shortly after October 13, 1864, arriving back from a recruiting trip and remained in command for the Second Battle of Fair Oaks.46
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col H. M. Plaisted was in charge of the 3rd Brigade during the Second Battle of Fair Oaks on October 27-28, 1864.47
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Col Dandy was in command of the 3rd Brigade from November 1, 1864 until Col Plaisted returned in early December 1864.48
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 10th Corps, AotJ: Captain Frank C. Brunck was in command of the 100th NY from November 1, 1864 until Col Plaisted returned in early December 1864 and Col Dandy resumed command of the 100th NY.49
  • 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 24th Corps, AotJ: Colonel Dandy assumed command of the 3rd Brigade on February 2, 1865 due to the illness of Col Plaisted.  Plaisted was sick most of the month of February, and eventually went home on sick leave for 20 days to Maine and returned to Brigade command March 18, 1865, but relinquished command for good to Dandy on March 25, 1865.50
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 24th Corps, AotJ: Captain John McMann assumed command of the 100th NY on February 2, 1865 when Col Dandy assumed command of the Brigade.  McMann commanded the regiment until his discharge on March 7, 1865.51
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 24th Corps, AotJ: Captain Edwin Nichols assumed command of the regiment on March 7, 1865 and held it until March 27, 1865.52
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 24th Corps, AotJ: Major James H. Dandy, the colonel’s brother, assumed command of the regiment on March 27, 1865 and was in command until killed at Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865.53
  • 100th NY, 3rd Brig, 1st Div, 24th Corps, AotJ: Captain Edwin Nichols assumed command of the 100th NY on April 2, 1865, after Major Dandy was killed at Fort Gregg and remained in command through Lee’s surender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.54

Other:

  • Per Dyer’s Compendium, the 100th NY belonged to the 2nd Brig, 1st Div, Tenth Corps, AotJ to some time in May 1864, then the 3rd Brig, 1st Div, Tenth Corps, AotJ to December 1864, and lastly to the 3rd Bruig, 1st Div, Twenty-Fourth Corps, AotJ through the end of the Appomattox Campaign.55
  • As of May 6, 1864, the 100th New York appears to have been assigned to “the Third Brigade, Terry’s division”, which means they transferred from the 2nd Brigade probably at the very outset of the Bermuda Hundred Campaign.56
  • A photo of Major Daniel D. Nash is after page 66.57

Sources:

  1. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 246
  2. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 247-248
  3. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 252
  4. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 252-255
  5. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 256-260
  6. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 262
  7. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 263-264
  8. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 265
  9. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 267
  10. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 268
  11. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 271-272
  12. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 278
  13. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 279
  14. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 282-287
  15. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 288-295
  16. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 297
  17. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 304-305
  18. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 305-307
  19. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 308-311
  20. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 311
  21. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 312
  22. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 314
  23. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 315-318
  24. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 318
  25. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 319
  26. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 321
  27. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 323
  28. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 324-325
  29. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 330
  30. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 331
  31. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 333-336
  32. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 338
  33. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, pages 339-340
  34. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 342
  35. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 261: “In a wood at the road side were the scattered remnants of the One Hundredth Regiment, which a few days before, and even on that fatal morning, was the size of many brigades, now was hardly cognizable as a regiment at all. Gen. Butler and staff riding by, said: “Where is your regiment?” He was shown the handful in the wood and told that there was what remained of seven hundred men. He said he was sorry for us, that we were a brave regiment, but he could not help us in the hour of need. As we marched and neared the camp we left on the morning of the 12th, our numbers kept increasing, though the sad gaps in companies at roll call, told a tale of loss unmistakable. Co. ” K,” commanded by Lieut. Stowits, had lost during the 13th, 14th and 16th, twenty-four men and one officer, in killed, wounded and missing; a fair average of the loss of each company in the regiment.”
  36. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 244, 247
  37. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 246
  38. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 257
  39. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 271: But see The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volume XL, Part 1 (Serial Number 80), page 233 which indicates Foster was not assigned to command the 3rd Brig, 1st Div, Tenth Corps until June 23, 1864.
  40. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 285
  41. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 300
  42. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 301
  43. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 307
  44. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 308
  45. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 309
  46. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 314-315
  47. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 316
  48. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 321
  49. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 321
  50. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 325, 328-329
  51. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 325, 328-329
  52. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 329
  53. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 329, 340
  54. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 346
  55. http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unnyinf8.htm#1
  56. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, page 246
  57. History of the One Hundredth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, after page 67

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