BTC Notes: History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers

   

0 comments

in BTC Notes

Note: The BTC Notes series serves as a way to gather important information about a given source on the Siege of Petersburg like a book, article, essay, map, etc.

105thPAScott1877Subject: History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers by Kate M. Scott

Important Points:

Note:

* Earlier chapters do not discuss the Bermuda Hundred Campaign or the Siege of Petersburg and were not consulted for the purposes of this research.

PETERSBURG CONTENT STARTS ON PAGE: 110

CHAPTER X: North Anna, March to Petersburg, etc. (North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg)

* Crossing of the James River, June 12-14, 18641

* Second Battle of Petersburg, June 15-18, 18642

* Up to and including Battle of Jerusalem Plank Road, June 19-24, 1864.3

* Rest of June 1864, June 25-June 30, 18644

* July 1-26, 18645

* First Deep Bottom Campaign, July 26-29, 18646

* August 1-12, 18647

* Second Deep Bottom Campaign, August 12-20, 18648

* August 18-25, 18649

* Septebmer 1, 186410

CHAPTER XI: Petersburg (Middle portion)

* Rest of September 186411

* October 1-26, 186412

* Sixth Offensive13

* October 29-November 30, 186414

* November 30-December 7, 186415

* Seventh Offensive, Dedecmeber 7-14, 186416

* Winter Quarters, December 15, 1864 to February 5, 186517

* Eighth Offensive, February 5-8, 186518

* Winter Quarters Built, February 15, 186519

Chapter XII: Petersburg (End) and Appomattox

* Grand Reviews, March 11 & 23, 186520

* Action at the Watkins House, March 25, 186521

* Ninth Offensive, March 28-April 2, 186522

* Appomattox Campaign23

* Rest of April 186524

Chapter: Leader Sketches

COMMANDERS AT PETERSBURG

* Colonel Calvin A. Craig25

* Major James Miller26

* LtCOl Levi Bird Duff27

* Captain Oliver C. Redic28

* Captain John C. Conser29

* Captain Winfield S. Barr (when did he command?): “During part of the Petersburg siege, Captain Barr commanded the regiment, and at another time had command of Company K, in addition to his own company, on account of the absence of the officers of that company from wounds and sickness.”30

OTHERS AT PETERSBURG

* Adjutant Hillis McKown (Sept. 28, 1864-end of Siege)31

* Quartermaster Joseph Craig (Sept. 28, 1864-end of Siege)32

* Captain Charles E. Patton33

* Lieutenant Joseph L. Evans34

* Captain Tilton C. Reynolds35

* Captain Silas J. Marlin (Assistant Inspecot-General of the First Division, Second Corps, AotP)36

 

Order of Battle:
* None found.

Unit Leaders:

* 105th PA: Major Duff was in command on June 3, 1864 at the Battle of Cold Harbor.37

* 105th PA: Major Duff was in command on June 16-18, 1864 at the Second Battle of Petersburg.38

* 105th PA: Major Duff was wounded and lost a limb on June 18, 1864 at the Second Battle of Petersburg. The text is not specific on who replaced him from June 18-June 22, 1864.39

* 105th PA: Colonel Craig rejoined the regiment on June 22, 1864, seemingly literally during the Battle of Jerusalem Plank Road.40

* Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, AotP: R. B. Pierce assumes command on or after June 29, 1864: …”and on the 29th moved again…Here Brigadier-General R. B. Pierce assumed command of the Third [sic, Second] Brigade. He was a very efficient officer, but had not the dash of the gallant and lamented Hays, whom he succeeded.”41

* 105th PA: Colonel Craig was in charge of the regiment on July 11, 1864. He was ever so slightly wounded by a shell which blackened the skin of his shoulder, but remained in charge. The same shell wounded Colonel Phineas S. Davis of the 39th Massachusetts was wounded more severely by the same shell.42,43

* 105th PA: Colonel Craig was present and in comand in early August, sometime between August 1 and 12, 1864.: “They were now only three-fourths of a mile from Petersburg. While here a cannon-ball struck the breastworks and almost buried Colonel Craig and two of the men amid the debris that it created, but injured no one. Here they remained doing picket and fatigue duty, ” slashing ” timber, etc., until August 12th”44

* 105th PA: Captain Patton was in charge of the 105th PA on at least August 15, 1864, while Colonel Craig was in charge of the Second Brigade, Third Division, II Corps, AotP: Captain Patton at this time commanded the regiment, Colonel Craig being in temporary command of the Third [sic, Second] Brigade.”45

* Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, AotP: Colonel Craig was in charge of the Second Brigade, Third Division, II Corps, AotP on at least August 15, 1864: “Captain Patton at this time commanded the regiment, Colonel Craig being in temporary command of the Third [sic, Second] Brigade.”46

* Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, AotP: Colonel Craig was mortally wounded, shot through the head, on August 16, 1864, and died the next day. No successor is mentioned as far as brigade command: ..”just as he had given the command to his loved, tried, and trusted regiment, Colonel Craig fell mortally wounded, and the next day [August 17, 1864] gave up his life for his country, — one of the noblest sacrifices of the war. He was shot through the head just as his voice rang out the command to charge, and, though he lingered for some hours ere death claimed him, he never regained consciousness or spoke again. Two enlisted men were killed, and Captain Barr and sixteen men wounded.”47

* 105th PA: Captain Conser assumed command of the 105th PA on August 17, 1864, the day Craig died of his August 16 wound and the day Captain Conser rejoined the regiment.: “After the death of Colonel Craig, Captain Conser, who that day rejoined the regiment, assumed the command. He had been commissioned major May 6, 1864, but was not yet mustered as such, having been absent on account of wounds received in the Wilderness.”48

* 105th PA: Major Conser was in command on October 27, 1864.: “Major Conser and Captain Patton, the two senior officers of the regiment, were killed while fighting desperately against superior numbers.49

* 105th PA: Captain James Miller assumed command, presumably on October 27 after Conser and Patton were killed: “After the fall of Major Conser and Captain Patton, Captain James Miller, of Company K, a brave and meritorious officer, who had risen from the ranks, being the senior officer, took command of the regiment by order of General Pierce, and was afterwards commissioned major and colonel.”50

* 105th PA: Miller appears to still have been in command on October 29: “xxx”51

* 105th PA: Captain Redic was in command on February 5, 1865: “until the 5th of February, 1865, when they moved, with the rest of the brigade, about five miles, when Captain Redic, who was then in command”…52

* 105th PA: Colonel [Major?] James Miller was in command on March 25, 1865: “”On the 25th orders were received to be ready to move at a moment’s notice. Colonel Miller formed his command…”53

* Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, AotP: General Pierce was in command on March 25, 1865: …”where he was ordered by General Pierce to report to Colonel Zinn, of the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers”…54

* 57th PA: Colonel Zinn was in command on March 25, 1865: …”where he was ordered by General Pierce to report to Colonel Zinn, of the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers”…55

* 105th PA skirmishers: Captain Redic seems to have had the informal role of commander of skirmishers anytime a detachment was sent out from the 105th PA during March-April 1865.56

Unit Leader Images:

* Colonel Calvin A. Craig, after page 5857

* Captain John C. Conser, after page 8258

* Lt. Col. Levi Bird Duff, after page 11259

* Captain Oliver C. Redic, after page 16860

* Major James Miller, after page 20261

 

Unit Strengths

* 121 “guns” on July 4, 1864: “When they started on the campaign they had 331 guns and 21 officers; at this date, July 4, they had 121 guns, their entire force.”62

Unit Armament

* October 6-24, 1864: Springfield Rifles, AFTER mid-October, Spencer Repeating Rifles: “Here they remained until the 24th, and during that time turned in their Springfield rifles, receiving in their stead Spencer repeating rifles.”63

Itinerary:
* June 12, 1864: Left Cold Harbor Front…”just after dark on the night of the 12th [of June, 1864], the army silently withdrew from the enemy’s front; and so well was this movement executed, that it was not known to Lee until the next morning that our army was miles away. The One Hundred and Fifth, after abandoning the line on the Mechanicsville road, marched in a south-easterly direction, halting after midnight until the next morning”… 64

* June 13, 1864: …”until the next morning, when they resumed the march, crossing the Chickahominy at Long Bridge, and thence across the Peninsula, and encamped that night at Charles City Court-House”65

* June 14, 1864: …”and on the 14th marched to Wilcox’s Landing, on the James river, where they embarked on the small steamer ” Helen Getty,” and landed at Windmill Point, where they encamped for the night on the Wilcox plantation, which is situated on the heights above the river.”66

* June 15, 1864: …”Just before noon the next day, they started in the direction of Petersburg, arriving in the vicinity of that place shortly after dark, where they manoeuvred all night”…67

* June 16, 1864: …”and finally took position at daylight, on the left of the Suffolk turnpike, at the line of works captured the previous day by the Eighteenth Corps. The regiment was the second from the right, a battalion of the Massachusetts First Heavy Artillery being on Major Duff’s right, with their right resting on the Suffolk road. The enemy’s line was some four hundred yards in their front, across a small stream, which traversed a deep ravine. About four, P. M., they were ordered to attack, and advanced across an open field, and through some woods, and when’near the enemy’s lines came into a lot of log cabins, which had constituted a rebel winter camp. Just at this juncture the enemy opened fire upon them, and in spite of all that their officers could do, the men sheltered themselves behind these cabins, and began to return the fire. It was impossible to urge them further, nor could they be restrained from firing, but continued to pour in a steady fire upon the enemy, until their ammunition became exhausted, and it being almost dark. Major Duff formed his regiment in line, just in the rear of the shanties, where they remained until nine, p. m., when they were relieved, and returned to their former position, where they remained quiet the balance of the night.”…68

* June 17, 1864: …”The next morning they moved to the front line, relieving a portion of the Second Division and taking position immediately on the right of the Suffolk turnpike, where they lay until dark, when, having been relieved by a portion of Mott’s brigade, the regiment moved towards the right of the line and formed in reserve. During the night orders were received to charge the enemy’s lines the next morning at daylight”…69

* June 18, 1864: …”orders were received to charge the enemy’s lines the next morning at daylight. On advancing they found that the enemy had abandoned the line in their immediate front, and had thrown up a new line of works a short distance south of the Suffolk turnpike, at right angles to their former line. They continued to advance by the left wheel until our lines lay along the Suffolk road, facing south. They lay here until half-past twelve o’clock, when they were ordered to attack. Lieutenant-Colonel Duff says:

‘I was ordered to take the front advance with my regiment, which now formed the right of the second line. In taking the advance I had to go over some heavy artillery regiments which occupied the front line. The men seemed very reluctant to do this ; but, upon my peremptory order, the One Hundred and Fifth went over, but a large portion of the Sixty-third remained behind.” [It must be borne in mind that, since the beginning of this movement, the Sixty-third had been attached to Lieutenant-Colonel Duff’s command.] “We advanced into an open field boldly, with flags flying, and the rebels immediately opened upon us with musketry and artillery, throwing canister. For some distance we advanced under a murderous fire, and, on looking around, I found that no portion of the line but my small regiment had moved. Having arrived at a point where the ground took a sudden rise, and where, by lying down, we could in a great measure shield ourselves from the enemy’s fire, I halted and ordered the men to lie down. I then went back to the road and informed the brigade commander. Colonel McCallish, that an attempt to charge by my small regiment would be foolish, and asked him to move the troops up on my left. His only answer was that he could not get them started. Disgusted, I went forward to my own line, and was just getting it started when I was shot down.’

Lieutenant-Colonel Duff’s wound was a serious one, and resulted in the loss of a limb. He showed the coolest bravery on this occasion, as did all the other officers. Captain Conser was wounded, and Lieutenant Mitchell, who had only rejoined his regiment at Tolopotomy creek, was again wounded, as were also Lieutenants Patterson and McAninch. Captain Moorhead, of the Sixty-third, was killed. He was a noble, gallant officer, and his loss was much deplored, both by his own regiment and the One Hundred and Fifth, The color-bearer was also killed, but the colors were saved. The little force then rallied, repulsed the enemy, and captured his works.”…70

* June 19, 1864: “On the evening of the 19th the regiment built breastworks within one hundred yards of the enemy’s line. Here the boys would get ready for firing, and then at a given signal they would give a shout as though about to charge, when the rebels would jump up from behind their breastworks only to receive a murderous fire. This continued for some time, but at last they became too wary to venture their heads in view of the ” Yankee ” guns, and the yells would only be greeted by some “gray coat” crying out: “Too old, Yank; you can’t win on that trick no more.” Here Sergeant Isaiah E. Davis, of Company I, one of the best soldiers and truest Christians in the regiment, was killed. He was lying on a settee, which some of the boys had brought from ” Hare’s House,” near by, when a ball from a rebel sharp-shooter, who had a flanking fire and was concealed in a tree in the rear, caused the poor sergeant to ” sleep the sleep that knows no waking.””71

* June 20, 1864: “On the 20th the regiment moved to the rear and bivouacked for the night”…72

* June 21, 1864: …”and on the 21st moved with the brigade in the direction of the Weldon Railroad, halting four miles from it, where they lay during the night.”73

* June 22, 1864: “On the 22d the regiment advanced into the edge of the woods near the enemy’s line, where they had orders to build breastworks. They at once commenced tearing down fences, and with rails, etc., the building of the works was progressing finely, when “whiz! bang!” came a perfect storm of bullets, and from the wrong direction, too; for the rebels had got in their rear, and the One Hundred and Fifth was almost captured. There had been a gap left in the line between General Barlow’s and General Birney’s divisions, and through this the enemy had penetrated, striking our rear, where they expected to take a large amount of prisoners. Our troops were driven some distance, but soon rallied, made a gallant charge, and drove the enemy back. The loss of the regiment was one killed, three wounded, and seven taken prisoners. Here Colonel Craig, who had been absent on account of wounds received at the Wilderness, rejoined them, and so glad were they to welcome back their gallant leader, that, when they espied him, the entire regiment rose up amid a perfect shower of balls and gave him three cheers. “74

* June 23, 1864: “On the 23d they remained on the same line”…75

* June 24, 1864: …”and the next day moved with the brigade a short distance to the rear. Here the men suffered from the extreme heat, and from the scarcity of water. They remained in this position until the 27th”…76

* June 27, 1864: …”They remained in this position until the 27th, when the brigade moved to the front and assisted in building works”…77

* June 29, 1864: …”and on the 29th moved again with the brigade a short distance to the right, where they again built works, in the rear of which they encamped. Here Brigadier-General R. B. Pierce assumed command of the Third [sic, Second] Brigade. He was a very efficient officer, but had not the dash of the gallant and lamented Hays, whom he succeeded.”78

* June 30-July 4, 1864: “The regiment remained encamped between the Weldon Railroad and the Jerusalem plank-road until July 4, occupying the extreme right of the Second Corps.”79

* July 4-12, 1864: “The regiment being on the extreme left of the Jerusalem plank-road, and only some two hundred yards from the enemy’s picket line, and three hundred and fifty yards from their main line, they had built pretty strong breastworks, so constructed that the men could jump out of their tents, run for the breastworks at the least alarm, and be ready for action…The regiment remained in these quarters, which they called ” Camp Hays,” in honor of General Hays, until the 12th”…80

* July 11, 1864: “Being in such close proximity to the enemy the utmost vigilance was exercised by the officers, and just before daylight, on the morning of July 11, Colonel Craig was roused from his slumbers by a rifle-shot immediately in his front. He sprang to his feet, but, before he could draw on his boots, there came a regular volley from the rebel skirmishers, which rattled like hail through the “saplings,” which were standing thick in camp. He called as loudly as he could for the men to “fall in at the breastworks,” and rushed out with his sword and coat in his hand, and found the men coming up pell-mell — some with only one shoe on, some with their clothes only partly on, some without caps, and in every manner of deshabille, but every man with his gun and accoutrements. Their only safety was in getting behind the breastworks. The affair only occupied a few moments, and by the time they were ready to receive the enemy the firing ceased, and on inquiry it was found. that some one on the picket line had become alarmed at something and fired his piece, which was a signal for both skirmish lines to open upon one another as fast as they could load and fire (our skirmish line was about sixty yards in front of the breastworks); but after firing a few rounds each party saw that it was not a general attack, and the firing ceased as though by mutual consent. After a good laugh at the appearance they presented, the men dispersed and went to cooking breakfast; but had the “Johnnies” came then, they would have met with a warm reception, for each man seemed eager for the onslaught, and so intense was the expectation that you could have heard a pin drop.”81

* July 12-24, 1864: …”until the 12th, when they moved about three miles to the right, where they remained until the 26th”…82

* July 24, 1864: …”where they remained until the 26th [sic, 24th?], and then moved with the brigade to Point of Rocks, on the Appomattox river, where they crossed on pontoons, marched all night”…83

* July 25, 1864: …”and halted the next morning for a short time near the James river, where they were held as a temporary reserve between City Point and the Norfolk and Petersburg railroad, about three miles from Petersburg, but not in range of the rebel guns, where they could plainly view the cannonading on both sides.”84

* July 26, 1864: “On Tuesday, July 28th [sic, July 26th, which was a Tuesday], the One Hundred and Fifth left camp at five, P. M., and, marching all night,”…”85

* July 27, 1864: “at daybreak crossed the James river at Jones’ Neck, and were at once engaged with the enemy, who held the other side, and drove him, capturing four twenty-pound Parrott guns from him before seven, a. m., after which they manoeuvred all day and lay down at midnight on their arms, having skirmished with the enemy all day. “86

* July 28, 1864: “The next morning at daylight took a new position, which they held until dark, when they again moved in the direction of Petersburg”…87

* July 29, 1864: …”arriving near the headquarters of the Eighteenth Corps about daybreak the next morning, having marched the entire night. The regiment, with the Second Corps, lay there until”…88

* July 30, 1864: …”lay there until the next night, when they relieved the Eighteenth Corps on the front line, remaining there until the next evening, Saturday, when they returned to their old camp. While relieving the Eighteenth Corps they were constantly engaged in skirmishing, but the One Hundred and Fifth sustained no loss except two men wounded.”89

* August 1-12, 1864: “They were now only three-fourths of a mile from Petersburg. While here a cannon-ball struck the breastworks and almost buried Colonel Craig and two of the men amid the debris that it created, but injured no one. Here they remained doing picket and fatigue duty, ” slashing ” timber, etc., until August 12th”90

* August 12, 1864: …”until August 12th, when they broke camp and with the brigade moved to City Point, where they halted and bivouacked for the night”…91

* August 13, 1864: …”and at three p. m. the next day embarked on transports and ascended the James river to Deep Bottom,”…92

* August 14, 1864: …”ascended the James river to Deep Bottom, where they landed on the morning of the 14th, and then moved across the country for a short distance, halting in a strip of woods, where they lay”…93

* August 15, 1864: …”in a strip of woods, where they lay until the next morning, and then with the brigade moved forward in the direction of Charles City cross-roads. Captain Patton at this time commanded the regiment, Colonel Craig being in temporary command of the Third Brigade. After marching a few miles they halted and formed line of battle, their right resting on the First Maine cavalry. They then advanced on the enemy and drove him three or four miles, through a thick forest, back to his line of works, thus gaining possession of the Charles City cross-roads. Their brigade was withdrawn at dark near the Tenth Corps’ headquarters, where they remained a short time, and then moved to the front and relieved troops of the Tenth Corps, remaining on duty there until morning. The casualties during the day were six enlisted men wounded. “94

* August 16, 1864: “On the i6th the regiment moved forward with the brigade and formed line on the right of the Tenth Corps, their right connecting with that of the First Maine dismounted cavalry. They advanced and drove the enemy into his works, and then charged and captured them. Colonel Craig’s brigade was then formed in front of the captured works and at right angles with them.

General Terry’s orders were to ” go as far as you can and roll the rebels right up,” and they did, as one of the One Hundred and Fifth officers remarked, ” roll them up right smart for awhile,” capturing their works and seventy-five men and two commissioned officers. But while flushed with victory, and driving the enemy before them, a heavy force of the rebels fell on the right flank of the brigade with such fury that it was compelled to fall back, regiment after regiment, and company after company, and last of all, the remnant of the brave old One Hundred and Fifth, upon which such a fearful loss had fallen ; for, while leading the charge, and just as he had given the command to his loved, tried, and trusted regiment, Colonel Craig fell mortally wounded, and the next day [August 17, 1864] gave up his life for his country, — one of the noblest sacrifices of the war. He was shot through the head just as his voice rang out the command to charge, and, though he lingered for some hours ere death claimed him, he never regained consciousness or spoke again. Two enlisted men were killed, and Captain Barr and sixteen men wounded.”95

* August 17, 1864: “The regiment remained about sixty yards in rear of the works, the taking of which had cost them so dear, until the morning of the 18th”…96

* August 18, 1864: …”until the morning of the 18th, when they moved in the direction of Petersburg”…97

* August 19-25, 1864: …”and at seven, a. m., the next morning moved to the picket line, where their brigade relieved a portion of the Ninth Corps, and remained there doing picket duty until the 25th”…”While on picket one man was killed and four wounded.”98

* August 25, 1864: …”until the 25th, when they moved to the rear in the front line of breastworks.”99

* September 1, 1864: “On the 1st of September those members of the One Hundred and Fifth who had not re-enlisted were mustered out on the expiration of their term of service, and one hundred and sixty-two men and two officers of the Sixty-third, who had reenlisted, were transferred to the One Hundred and Fifth. They had at first been assigned to the Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, but protested so strongly against this transfer, that they were finally transferred to the One Hundred and Fifth.”100

* All of September 1864: “The regiment remained in the position which they had taken on the 25th of June until the 1st of October, engaged in fatigue and picket duty. The pickets kept up an almost incessant firing, and the “whiz” of a minie-ball was heard every few minutes.”101

* October 1, 1864: “On the 1st of October the brigade was transported in cars and landed near the Weldon railroad, where they bivouacked for the night.”102

* October 2, 1864: “On the 2d they moved a short distance to the left and assisted in dislodging the enemy’s cavalry, which occupied a position there, then fell back, after advancing some distance to the line of works that had been captured in the morning by other troops. Several were wounded during the day.”103

* October 2-5, 1864: …”They remained in this position until the night of the 5th”…104

* October 5, 1864: …”until the night of the 5th, when they moved with the brigade to the Jones House, near Petersburg.”105

* October 6, 1864: “At one, a. m., they halted and went into line on, the first line of works. “106

* October 6-26, 1864: “Here they remained until the 24th [sic, 26th?], and during that time turned in their Springfield rifles, receiving in their stead Spencer repeating rifles.”63

* October 26, 1864: “On the 24th [sic, Oct. 26th] the regiment, with the brigade, broke camp, and moved out along the Weldon railroad about a mile beyond the Yellow House, where they bivouacked for the night.”108

* October 27, 1864: “The next morning moved to the left in the direction of the Southside railroad. Their force consisted of the Second and Third Divisions of the Second Corps, one division of cavalry, and a battery of artillery. There was skirmishing on the front during the day, and about noon the entire force reached a field which was in range of the enemy’s batteries. Here our batteries were planted, and soon a brisk cannonading commenced. At four, p. M., Brigadier-General Pierce ordered the One Hundred and Fifth into a dense forest, to hold that portion of the line connecting with the Ninety-first New York on their left, while a few cavalry were posted at some distance. The rebels, with a yell, soon came charging through the woods, but were kept at bay by the One Hundred and Fifth, who used their Spencer rifles to some purpose, until the cavalry on their right gave way, unknown to the One Hundred and Fifth, thus letting a heavy force of the enemy on their flank and rear, and though the heroic little band forced the enemy back again and again, they had to yield at last to superior numbers. The conflict was a terrible one. Major Conser and Captain Patton, the two senior officers of the regiment, were killed while fighting desperately against superior numbers. It was one of the most desperate hand-to-hand conflicts of the war. The bodies of the slain were left on the field.

After the regiment had been flanked by the enemy and almost entirely surrounded, it was ordered out, but, not wishing to leave the dead body of his friend and comrade. Major Conser, Captain Redic called some of his men to assist him in taking it off the field. The brush being very thick, they made but slow progress, and were soon some distance behind the rest of the regiment, and their surprise can be imagined when, on coming out of the woods into the field where they had gone in, to find it in full possession of the rebels, and a stand of rebel colors in their front. Supposing that the balance of the regiment had got out and joined their corps before the enemy had gained possession of the field. Captain Redic determined to make a desperate effort to escape. Laying down the dead body of Major Conser, to save which he had gotten him.self and his men into the present desperate strait, he commanded the few men he had with him to commence firing into the enemy, who were very close to them and evidently much excited. This they at once did, pouring in a continuous fire, which their Spencer rifles enabled them to do with great rapidity, and the effect upon the rebels was wonderful. Not looking for an attack from this direction, it took them completely by surprise, causing them to break in every direction for the shelter of the woods. Seizing this opportunity. Captain Redic sprang from under cover of the wood and started across the field, ordering his little command, consisting of Corporals David Creswell, Henry Rhodes, and A. Edinger, and Private Charles Gallagher and one man from the Fifth Michigan to follow him, he was soon passing through the opening made in the enemy’s line; but as the firing upon them suddenly ceased, the rebels recovered from their panic and again turned their attention to Captain Redic and his handful of men.

The sharp command, “Halt, you d d Yankee!” came
from every direction, accompanied by the sharp crack of rifles in rather too close proximity for safety. The Captain had, however, made up his mind to escape, and made quick time. Two balls passed through his coat, one through his haversack, and another smashed his sword-scabbard. Having escaped personal injury from this volley he determined to risk another, and in doing so was obliged to run for three hundred yards over the field, exposed to a perfect shower of balls from the rebels. On reaching the woods on the opposite side of the field, he sprang behind a tree and looked around for some trace of his men, but they were not to be seen, having all been captured and taken to Petersburg. The Captain then made his way back to the regiment, which he gained without further adventure.

It will thus be seen that every effort was made by the survivors to prevent the dead bodies of their comrades from falling into the enemy’s hands. The entire regiment acted nobly in this engagement, fighting against desperate odds, through the rebel hordes, back into our own lines, many of them escaping after they had once been captured. Besides Major Conser and Captain Patton, the regiment lost two enlisted men killed, eighteen wounded, and thirty missing, but nearly all the latter were recaptured the same evening. The regiment, the first time in its history, lost a stand of colors, which were captured by the enemy; but the regiment was in no way blamable for this, and General Orders from Headquarters Army of the Potomac, dated November 7, 1864, states that the ” colors were lost under circumstances which reflect no dishonor upon the regiment,” and another stand of colors was ordered to be furnished them. The failure of this movement was caused by the rebel infantry suddenly falling upon Pierce’s brigade from the rear, when most of the troops had been placed so as to meet the attack from a different direction.

Our troops rallied after this disaster to the One Hundred and Fifth, and most of the rebels who came out into the field were captured. The battle raged fearfully until after dark, and at midnight our forces commenced to retreat.

After the fall of Major Conser and Captain Patton, Captain James Miller, of Company K, a brave and meritorious officer, who had risen from the ranks, being the senior officer, took command of the regiment by order of General Pierce, and was afterwards commissioned major and colonel. On the 27th, at ten, p. m., the regiment, with the brigade, moved in the direction of Petersburg”109

* October 28, 1864: …”halting at two, A. m., until daylight, when the march was resumed, and after proceeding a short distance, they were ordered to camp.”110

* October 29, 1864: “On the 29th, Captain Miller was ordered by General Pierce to report to Colonel Fulford, of the Fifth Michigan, for orders, which he did, and then with the Fifth Michigan and Second United States sharpshooters went into Fort Davis, on the front line of works, and directly in front of Petersburg, and to the left of the works known as “Fort Hell.””111

* November 24, 1864 (Thanksgiving): Thanksgiving day was enlivened with a real Yankee Thanksgiving dinner, sent from the North by friends of the soldiers in New York, and to which the boys, so long accustomed to nothing but army rations, did full justice.112

* October 29-November 30, 1864: “The regiment remained in Fort Davis until the 30th”…113

* November 30, 1864: …”until the 30th, when they were ordered to join the Second Brigade. The casualties during this time was one killed and four wounded — one mortally. They joined the brigade, moved a short distance, and then went into camp”…114

* November 30-December 7, 1864: …”until the 30th, when they were ordered to join the Second Brigade [Third Division, Second Corps, AotP]…They joined the brigade, moved a short distance, and then went into camp, where they remained until December 7th”…115

* December 7, 1864: …”until December 7th, when, acting upon orders from brigade headquarters, they broke camp and moved out the Jerusalem plank-road, crossed the Nottaway river that evening, and bivouacked for the night.”116

* December 8-9, 1864: “At seven the next morning took up the line of march, passing Sussex Court-House, where, says an officer, “Apple Jack was found in many of the farm-houses on the route. One of our boys, who took too much of it, was captured. Some of the other troops who drank too much of the stuff, and fell behind their commands, were brutally murdered by the enemy.” The regiment assisted in destroying about twenty-five miles of the VVeldon railroad, after which they encamped in the woods for the night — rain and sleet falling all night, making it very cold and disagreeable.”117

* December 10, 1864: “On the morning of the 11th [sic, 10th], having accomplished the object of their mission, which was to destroy the railroad, they commenced falling back, the enemy following, and there was some skirmishing by our rear guard. They halted that evening within four miles of Sussex Court-House”…118

* December 11, 1864: …”and on the 11th crossed the Nottaway river, and encamped for the night”…119

* December 12-15, 1864: …”and the next day, with the brigade, marched fifteen miles. The day was very cold and stormy, and the troops suffered severely. They halted at one, p. m., not far from their old camp near Petersburg, where, after lying in an open field, exposed to the storm”…120

* December 15, 1864: …”until the 15th, apparently awaiting some move of the enemy, they were ordered into camp near Warrenton Station, or Poplar Grove church. The regiment suffered severely on its march back to their old camp, and when it arrived at the old quarters some of the companies had not a dozen men — one company only its captain and first sergeant — but the men, exhausted though they were, found their way into camp during the night, and at roll call the next morning all were at their posts. “121

* December 15, 1864-February 5, 1865: “The place where they were now in camp was a very pretty location — well wooded and with plenty of good water. The One Hundred and Forty-first Pennsylvania was encamped on their right, and the First Massachusetts heavy artillery on their left. Here the regular routine of camp duties was taken up — company drill in the morning and brigade drill in the afternoon, the regiment also furnishing its full proportion for picket and fatigue details each day…The regiment remained in camp, nothing of note occurring, until the 5th of February, 1865”122

* December 23, 1864: “On December 23d they were turned out to witness the execution of a man from the Second Massachusetts heavy artillery — a scene that always cast a feeling of horror over the soldiers ; for, though they were accustomed to meeting death in every shape, yet it was the death of the soldier and not the felon.”123

* February 5, 1865: …”until the 5th of February, 1865, when they moved, with the rest of the brigade, about five miles, when Captain Redic, who was then in command, was ordered to move his regiment to the left and ascertain, if possible, the strength of the enemy.

After a reconnolssance, they discovered that the enemy was posting his pickets in our front. At this juncture they received orders to open the road to Grand Creek bridge and keep communication open to said bridge. This was done with a line of pickets connecting with a similar line extending from the Fifth Army Corps. Companies C and H held the extreme left of the line, and Captain Reynolds, who commanded the left, received the following order from General Pierce :

“If the enemy advance, look out and do not get flanked; hold him as long as possible, and, if overpowered,, fall back and every man lookout for himself.”

They held this position for some time, until the line had been extended, connecting the Second and Fifth Corps. This line extended about two miles, and was held by the One Hundred and Fifth from three, p. m., until one o’clock the next morning”…124

* February 6, 1865: …”until one o’clock the next morning, when they were relieved by the One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York. For this they were highly complimented by General Mott, who said : ” No other regiment would have attempted such a hazardous undertaking.” They were then ordered by General Mott to join their brigade, which was lying near Hatcher’s Run ; this they did, and moved at daylight through the breastworks and advanced towards the enemy’s main line of fortifications. Brisk skirmishing was going on in front, and the regiment expected every moment to be ordered to push forward on the main line, but it proved to be only a reconnoissance in force to ascertain the enemy’s position, and the regiment shortly after retired to the line it had previously vacated, and remained in this position until nearly dark, when a portion of the Fifth and Sixth Corps got into a panic, and the One Hundred and Fifth, with the brigade, was ordered out to reinforce them ; but quiet being soon restored, the regiment returned to its former position and bivouacked for the night.

On the evening of the 6th it commenced snowing and sleeting, and continued until the next evening. The men were almost perished; some of them being unable to endure the exposure were sent back to the hospital in ambulances. On the evening of the 6th the regiment rejoined its own brigade. “125

* February 7, 1865: “The next morning orders were received to prepare for an advance, and, though the regiment lay in suspense all day, nothing was done.”126

* February 8, 1865: “About half-past seven, a. m., the next day, orders to march were again received, and, after moving about half a mile, the regiment countermarched and took up its old position.”127

* February 8-11, 1865: …”regiment countermarched and took up its old position. Remained here until the 11th”…128

* February 11, 1865: “Remained here until the 11th, when, at five, a. m., marching orders were again received, and they started towards the Squirrel Level road, and after a short march filed to the left and towards the front again, when, after a short halt, they moved into permanent quarters near Patrick Station and about half a mile from their old camp. This was the fourth time the One Hundred and Fifth had built winter-quarters since the commencement of cold weather. Here the regular routine of camp duties was resumed, only varied by the brigade being again called out to witness the execution of a soldier from one of the regiments for desertion.”129

* March 11 & 23, 1865: “On the 11th of March, 1865, the Second Corps was reviewed by General Humphreys, and on the 23d by Major-General Meade, General Grant being present.”130

* March 25, 1865 (Watkins House): “On the 25th orders were received to be ready to move at a moment’s notice. Colonel Miller formed his command, stacked arms, and gave orders for no man to leave camp. At two, p. m., moved with the brigade to the picket line, where he was ordered by General Pierce to report to Colonel Zinn, of the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; after reporting to him, the two regiments moved on another road leading to the enemy’s lines. After going a short distance, halted and took position at the edge of an open field, remaining there until sunset, when they were ordered to charge the enemy’s works, which order was immediately obeyed, and the rebels, who occupied the rifle-pits, were driven into their works. The casualties in the regiment were one man killed and five wounded. The charge was handsomely sustained and the enemy repulsed with severe loss.

Captain Redic was brigade officer of the day upon this occasion, and at break of day General Pierce sent a detachment from the Twentieth Indiana, and one from the Eleventh Massachusetts, one reporting at the right and the other at the left of his line. Captain Redic then filled the gap between them with the reserve of his line, and charged the enemy, driving him from his picket line, capturing several officers and a number of men; he sustained very slight loss, one man being killed and Lieutenant Campbell of the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers wounded. “131

* March 26, 1865: “The One Hundred and Fifth was relieved at two, p. m., the next day and returned to their old camp”…132

* March 26-28, 1865: …”returned to their old camp, where they remained until the 28th. From the 24th to the 28th of March the regiment received two hundred and ninety-one recruits, nearly all raw material — many of them bounty jumpers, most of whom afterwards deserted. Notwithstanding there were many good men among them, the spring campaign had already commenced, and there was no time to drill them, or accustom them to their duties.”133

* March 28, 1865: “On the morning of the 28th marching orders were received, and the brigade moved, but the One Hundred and Fifth was detained — arming its recruits — until near noon, when they followed quickly after, and came up with the brigade at Hatcher’s Run, where they occupied their old works until the 31st.”134

* March 29, 1865: “On the 29th of March, at Hatcher’s Run. Captain Redic was sent out with a detail of one hundred and fifty picked men of the One Hundred and Fifth, to develop the strength of the enemy, and ascertain whether there was a connected line of works on a certain bend in the stream. His first attempt was satisfactory to the officer himself; he drove in the enemy’s pickets, and advanced until he could plainly see the entire line of the enemy, and drew upon his little command the fire of his main line of infantry behind the works, with that of two batteries of artillery. Captain Redic then withdrew his command, and sent his report to Major-General Mott This report was not well received, Mott saying that it could not be possible that there was a connected line of works on the opposite side of the run at that point ; and he ordered Captain Redic to charge the same point again. The Captain then requested that the General would send one of his staff to take the report. The request was granted, and the officer reported with all the dignity of a major-general. Captain Redic directed him to follow the line closely to a certain point, and then he would show him all he wanted to see.

The advance was again ordered, and the men, exasperated with the idea of charging such a place, determined to make the best of it, and rushing from their rifle-pits, they scrambled over logs and through the brush at a fearful rate, all the while keeping up a perfect stream of fire upon the enemy from their Spencer rifles. The rebel pickets were soon driven in, and Captain Redic and his little force were soon again receiving the compliments of a line of infantry and twelve pieces of artillery. Arriving at the designated spot, the Captain turned to show the staff officer what was in front; but on looking back towards the rear, he saw the valiant aid, who, thinking ” discretion the better part of valor,” was some two hundred yards distant, and making about ” two-forty ” time. Captain Redic recalled his men as best he could, only losing one man killed and two wounded. The formation of the ground was such that the enemy’s aim proved inaccurate.”135

* March 30, 1865: “The next morning, before the break of day. Captain Redic was ordered forward to the left, and took possession of a hill near the run, and directly in advance of where the regiment had endured the fiery ordeal of the 27th of October. Here they spent the entire day in a lively contest with the guns of the fort in their front. An eye-witness says, ” our boys had about as much say so about how many shots should -be fired as the rebels had.””136

* April 1, 1865: “April 1st changed position several times, and bivouacked in rear of the works for the night.”137

* April 2, 1865: “The next day moved, by right of company, through the enemy’s fortifications, which had been evacuated, owing to his line being stormed and captured on the left of Petersburg. The enemy being in full retreat, the One Hundred and Fifth halted for a short time on the Boydton plank-road, and then moved by right flank in the direction of Petersburg, and halted at the Sussex railroad for a short time ; then moved parallel to the enemy’s works, and halted within one mile of Petersburg, where they threw up temporary works, and bivouacked for the night. During the day one man was wounded.”138

* April 3, 1865: “On the 3d, the regiment moved with the brigade in a north-westerly direction, crossing several streams during the day, and at night bivouacked in an open field.”139

* April 4, 1865: “The next day moved at six, a. m., in the same direction as the previous day.”140

* April 5, 1865: “The next day still continued in the same direction, passing Getty’s store, crossing the Danville railroad, and encamping in a belt of woods.”141

* April 6, 1865: “On the 6th moved with the brigade several miles, and formed in line of battle near Sailor’s creek ; their right connected with the Seventeenth Maine, while the left was unprotected. They charged the enemy’s works, capturing one hundred and ninety-nine men and sixteen commissioned officers. Colonel Miller’s horse was wounded, and he was compelled to leave him. They made repeated charges during the day, capturing in all two hundred and thirty men and nineteen commissioned officers, and assisted in the evening in capturing a portion of the enemy’s train. As an officer remarked, ” It was a running fight all day.” They bivouacked that night near the captured train.”142

* April 7, 1865: “April 7th the regiment moved with the brigade at daylight, and, crossing the high bridge on the Southside railroad, formed line of battle on the other side. The rebels had set both the bridges — one a railroad bridge — on fire ; but our batteries forced the enemy to retire, and the flames were extinguished, the bridges repaired, and our forces passed over and formed on the other side. There was skirmishing in the front all the afternoon, and the One Hundred and Fifth built temporary works, where they bivouacked for the night.”143

* April 8, 1865: “The next day moved with the brigade, at daylight, in close pursuit of the enemy”…144

* April 9, 1865: …”and on the 9th, the enemy still being in retreat, they moved seven miles in the same direction and halted at Patterson’s Farm, in the vicinity of Clover Hill.

While this pursuit was going on, General Grant, foreshadowing the result, and magnanimously wishing to stop this wholesale slaughter of the flying foe, had written to General Lee that he was willing to grant him reasonable terms of peace. The terms dictated by General Grant, and finally acceded to by the leader of the Confederate forces, were liberal and generous in the extreme, and throughout the entire transaction the victorious general displayed the feeling and delicacy of the truly great, and shrank from fighting longer an almost annihilated foe. At the time when General Lee sent in his flag of truce, our troops were about to open upon the enemy again, and the news of the surrender was received with shouts of joy. At no time during the war was there such intense excitement in the ranks of our army. Our soldiers could now look forward with a certainty to going home and joining their families in the near future. There were no more long marches before them, no more cold bivouacks, no more hard battles to fight; but, instead, blessed peace was looming in the near horizon. Danger and death were behind them ; wives, children, friends before them. No wonder, then, that such a shout of joy and thanksgiving went up as made the hills and valleys of the Appomattox resound again and again ; and it was not alone from the “boys in blue” that these sounds of rejoicing emanated, but they were caught up by the gray-clad boys of the South, who helped to swell the anthem of praise that ascended to the God of Battles on that day. For while the Northern troops rejoiced in having effectually put down the rebellion — with having, by the force of their victorious arms, again brought peace to an unsevered nation — their vanquished foe rejoiced in that they were to rest from danger, toil, starvation, and death.

With high chivalrous magnanimity was the surrender conducted. Not a word of reproach was uttered, not a drum was beat, not a bugle-note was heard as the vanquished army laid down their arms before the victors. Of the large force that General Lee had commanded, comprising the flower of the Confederate army, but about twenty-two thousand surrendered — all the rest had been killed, wounded, captured, or deserted.”145

* April 11-12, 1865: “April nth the One Hundred and Fifth took up its line of march with the brigade in the direction of Richmond, Va., passing near Buckingham Court-House and High Bridge,”…146

* April 13-16, 1865: …”and on the eve of the 13th bivouacked in an open field, where they remained until the i6th. Here the terrible news of the assassination of President Lincoln reached them, and oh, what a wave of agony, of sorrow, went over the victorious army, flushed with victory, to learn that, in the capital of the nation, that nation’s chief had been stricken down by a cowardly murderer’s hand ! The soldiers mourned Abraham Lincoln as a true, unselfish friend — as one who had never turned a deaf ear to their cries for aid ; and some there were whose lives had been forfeited by military law, who, by his clemency, yet lived. It makes us rejoice to think that Abraham Lincoln lived to see the dawn of peace, to hear the footsteps of the advancing army as “they came marching home,” and to know that his hand had stricken the shackles from the limbs of the slave. Noble, martyred president, when he went down beneath the hand of the assassin, he could hear the paeans of praise ascending from a redeemed race, and his eyes closed upon this fair land united and mdeed free. “147

* April 16-May 2, 1865: “On the i6th of April the regiment moved a short distance and again went into camp, where it remained until May 2. During this time the new recruits were drilled twice each day. “148

Battle Excerpts:
* Crossing of the James and 2nd Battle of Petersburg, pages 110 to 112149

* Action at the Watkins House, March 25, 1865, pages 129-130150

* Captain Redic’s skirmishing at Hatcher’s Run, March 29-30, 1865151

* BIO of Colonel Calvin A. Craig, 105th PA152

* BIO of Colonel James Miller, 105th PA153

* BIO of LtCOl Levi Bird Duff, 105th PA154

* BIO of LtCOl Oliver C. Redic, 105th PA155

* BIO of Major John C. Conser, 105th PA156

* BIO of Adjutant Hillis McKown (Sept. 28, 1864-end of Siege)157

* BIO of Quartermaster Joseph Craig (Sept. 28, 1864-end of Siege)158

* BIO of Captain Winfield S. Barr (when did he command?): “During part of the Petersburg siege, Captain Barr commanded the regiment, and at another time had command of Company K, in addition to his own company, on account of the absence of the officers of that company from wounds and sickness.”159

* BIO of Captain Charles E. Patton160

* BIO of Lieutenant Joseph L. Evans161

* BIO of Captain Tilton C. Reynolds162

* BIO ofCaptain Silas J. MArlin (Assistant Inspecot-General of the First Division, Second Corps, AotP)163

 

Other:

* Biographical sketches of the main commanders start on page 142, end on page 226. Find ALL Petersburg men.164

* Roster starts on page 259, end on page 329.165

* Interesting discussion of the merger of the 63rd PA into the 105th PA.166

Sources:

  1. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 110
  2. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 110-112
  3. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 112-113
  4. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 113-114
  5. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 114-115
  6. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 116-117
  7. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  8. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 117-118
  9. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  10. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  11. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 121
  12. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 121-122
  13. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 122-124
  14. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  15. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  16. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 125-126
  17. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  18. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 126-128
  19. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 128
  20. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 129
  21. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 129-130
  22. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 130-132
  23. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 132-135
  24. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 135-136
  25. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 151-157
  26. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 158-159
  27. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 162-167
  28. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 168-171
  29. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 172-174
  30. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 193-194
  31. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 176
  32. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 179
  33. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 197
  34. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 201-202
  35. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 209-210
  36. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 212-213
  37. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 109
  38. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 111-112
  39. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 112
  40. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  41. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 114
  42. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 114, 116
  43. Ayoub, Michael N. The Campfire Chronicles: The Words and Deeds of the 88th Pennsylvania, 1861-1865. Xlibris, 2010, p. 288: Peirson assumed command after Davis was wounded by artillery fire during shelling of the lines.
  44. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  45. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  46. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  47. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  48. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 121
  49. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 122
  50. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 124
  51. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  52. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  53. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 129
  54. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 129
  55. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 129
  56. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 129-132
  57. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 58
  58. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 82
  59. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 112
  60. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 168
  61. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 202
  62. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 114
  63. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 122
  64. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 110
  65. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 110
  66. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 110
  67. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 110
  68. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 110-111
  69. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 111
  70. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 111-112
  71. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 112-113
  72. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  73. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  74. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  75. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  76. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  77. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 113
  78. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 113-114
  79. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 114
  80. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 114-115
  81. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 114-115
  82. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 115
  83. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 115
  84. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 115
  85. Scott, Kate M. History of The One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 115, 116: SOPO Editor’s Note: I know the printed date is in error, because the 2nd Corps crossed the James River at Deep Bottom on the night of July 26-27 and captured 4 20 lb Parrott rifles on the morning of Wednesday, July 27. The book contains a typo.
  86. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 116
  87. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 116
  88. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 116
  89. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 116-117: SOPO EDitor’s Note: This is a little weird, because the way the book reads, it seems like an extra day was put in somwhere between July 27, which was a Tuesday, and July 30, which was a Saturday. There seems to be a typo somewhere here. More research is needed.
  90. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  91. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  92. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  93. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  94. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 117
  95. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 117-118
  96. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  97. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  98. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  99. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 118
  100. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 118-119
  101. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 121
  102. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 121
  103. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 121
  104. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 121
  105. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 121-122
  106. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 122
  107. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 122
  108. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 122
  109. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 122-124
  110. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 124
  111. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 124-125
  112. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  113. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  114. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  115. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  116. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 125
  117. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 125-126
  118. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  119. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  120. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  121. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  122. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  123. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 126
  124. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 126-127
  125. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 127-128
  126. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 128
  127. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 128
  128. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 128
  129. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 128
  130. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 129
  131. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 129-130
  132. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 130
  133. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 130
  134. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 130
  135. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 130-131
  136. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 131
  137. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 131
  138. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 131-132
  139. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 132
  140. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 132
  141. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 132
  142. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 132
  143. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 134
  144. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 134
  145. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 134-135
  146. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 135
  147. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 135-136
  148. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 136
  149. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 110-112
  150. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 129-130
  151. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 130-131
  152. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 151-157
  153. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 151-157
  154. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 162-167
  155. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 168-171
  156. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 172-174
  157. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 176
  158. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 179
  159. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 193-194
  160. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), p. 197
  161. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 201-202
  162. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 209-210
  163. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 212-213
  164. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 142-220
  165. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 259-329
  166. Scott, Kate M. History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (New-World Publishing Company: 1877), pp. 119-120

***



What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books? See what a panel of bloggers said recently.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: